Forks and Hope

Forks and Hope

Huxley, Elspeth

1964

Book ID 114

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Author: Winston Churchill
Extract Date: 1907

East Africa

'For in truth, the problems of East Africa are the problems of the world.'

Extract ID: 163

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1961

Managi or Banagi

Money subscribed by his [Michael Grzimek] many friends to a memorial fund was spent on a small research laboratory at Managi [sic], near Seronera on the Serengeti. Six biologists are at work there under the direction of a distinguished Belgian, Dr. Jacques Verschuren, until recently chief biologist to the Parc National Albert in the Congo.

Extract ID: 1077

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1961

Rhino at Olduvai Gorge

The Olduvai Gorge used to be full of Rhino. And then, in 1961, in the space of six months, the Leakeys counted over fifty rotting carcases in the Gorge, all speared by Masai. Whether or not their motive was political, they had taken the profit; every horn had been removed.

Since then the Leakeys have not seen a single Rhino at Olduvai. This is typical of what is going on all over East Africa. The Rhino cannot hold out much longer.

[but see Fosbrookes comments in 1972]

Extract ID: 345

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1963

a noted botanist

A complete muster of Serengeti plants made recently by Dr. P.J.Greenway, a noted botanist, has distinguished over two thousand species.

Extract ID: 300

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1963

a wise ecologist

They [Masai] are observant people. Dr. Philip Glover, a wise ecologist, assured me that they have a name for every plant in his own large collection.

Extract ID: 284

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1963

have your cake and eat it

A grant of 182,000 had been made from the Fund - it runs out in 1964 - to get the Conservation area going, and experts had drawn up a Management Plan. This aim of this is:

to conserve and develop the natural resources of the whole Area (including water, soil, flora and fauna) so as to provide a stable environment for the human occupants and the animal occupants, domestic and wild, thereby retaining the existing residents rights and promoting the national interest by conserving the Area's unique tourist attraction, aesthetic value and scientific interest.

An unimpeachable aim - more briefly to have your cake and eat it. The plan runs to 160 pages and is full of sound projects and useful information, not all of it reassuring. The success of any plan depends on the staff who will carry it out, and Ngorongoro staffing has never been adequate either in numbers or in quality. Good work has been done, bold projects launched, but in fits and starts. In other words, all has not been plain sailing. Nor has the conflict between the Masai on one hand, and wild life, forests, rivers and the outside world on the other, been resolved.

Extract ID: 706

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964
Extract Date: 1963

Studying wildebeeste migration

[Watson, Murray] A British member of the team [at Banagi] is studying wildebeeste Migration.

Extract ID: 1100

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964

Bao board in the crater

Mr Fosbrooke showed me ... a rock from whose flat surface had been scooped a double line of shallow depressions, made for the game played all over Africa, played for many centuries and known by many different names. The Swahili word is bao, which simply means board, in which the shallow holes are often made: though they can be just as well marked in the dust under a shady tree. Into these depressions you drop beans or pebbles to a fixed number, and your object is to capture your opponent's counters. The rules are far too complicated for me, at any rate, to grasp. Men will spend hour after hour at bao, like chess players, and indeed it is a kind of African chess.

These depressions in the rock must have been made long before the coming of the Maasai who, according to the latest reckoning, did not enter the crater until about 1850. The earliest inhabitants, peoples called Iraqw and Tatog, have disappeared.

Extract ID: 99

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964

darting in the crater

[Orr, David] a warden previously engaged on darting in the Ngorongoro crater

Extract ID: 794

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964

fighting missionaries

Tall, blue-eyed, vigorous and determined, he [John Owen] is a fitting son to one of Kenya's best-known and most controversial earlier figures, the Rev. Walter Owen, Archdeacon of Nyanza from 1918 to 1944, who belonged to the old school of fighting missionaries - fighting for the right as he saw it, a Christian who pulled no punches and was know to those whom he had punched as the Archdemon.

Extract ID: 797

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964

no two zebra are alike

Dr Hans Klingel, a German scientist at Banagi, has discovered that, just as no two human finger-prints are identical, so are no two zebra alike in their marking

Extract ID: 421

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope, 1964

Seronera Lodge makes a good start

Seronera Lodge has made a good start with a bar well designed by a young Nairobi architect, Mr. Robert Marshall, shaped in a crescent moon and roofed in palm-thatch, built in undressed stone and enclosing in its arms an open-air patio with slabs of stone to sit on round a camp fire.

Extract ID: 584
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