Serengeti II: Dynamics, Management, and Conservation of an Ecosystem

Sinclair, A.R.E and Arcese, Peter M (Editors)

1995

Book ID 243

See also

Sinclair, A.R.E and Arcese, Peter M (Editors) Serengeti II: Dynamics, Management, and Conservation of an Ecosystem, 1995

A much earlier set of photographs was taken by Osa

A much earlier set of photographs was taken by Osa and Martin Johnson. These two American adventurers and filmmakers made three expeditions to Serengeti in 1926, 1928, and 1933 (their first expedition of 1922 did not provide photographs of Serengeti as far as I could ascertain). The last expedition used an aircraft, and some aerial photographs are available. Some of the photographs from these expeditions reside in the Martin and Osa Johnson Safari Museum, Chanute, Kansas. In September 1981 I visited this museum, and with the assistance of the curators, obtained copies of photographs whose locations I thought were identifiable.

[used in tree research to measure tree growth. One 1928 tree at Seronera is still alive, and, after assumptions about growth rate, it is deduced to have started growth in 1884]

'Equilibria in Plant-Herbivore Interactions' in:

Extract ID: 368

See also

Sinclair, A.R.E and Arcese, Peter M (Editors) Serengeti II: Dynamics, Management, and Conservation of an Ecosystem, 1995

Border with Kenya closed. 70,000 tourists in 1976; 10,000 . . .

Border with Kenya closed. 70,000 tourists in 1976; 10,000 in 1977

Extract ID: 1333

See also

Sinclair, A.R.E and Arcese, Peter M (Editors) Serengeti II: Dynamics, Management, and Conservation of an Ecosystem, 1995

Partial re-opening of the border for tourism

Partial re-opening of the border for tourism.

Extract ID: 1334

See also

Sinclair, A.R.E and Arcese, Peter M (Editors) Serengeti II: Dynamics, Management, and Conservation of an Ecosystem, 1995

The late Myles Turner, a warden in Serengeti during 1956-1972

The late Myles Turner, a warden in Serengeti during 1956-1972, wrote about research thus: 'One thing is sure: it was a great confidence trick, and virtually nothing has ever come out of it to help the hard-pressed animals of East Africa.' He has thrown down the challenge. We have accepted that challenge, and this book [Serengeti II] is part of the answer. It is not complete; we shall build on it and continue to work toward syntheses of research that allow its beneficial application. In the process, we hope to show that research is fundamental to management and conservation.

Extract ID: 1344
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