Arusha School Magazine

Arusha School Magazine

1956 February

Book ID 298

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 01
Extract Date: 1956

Preface ~ Speech Day

Preface

I have great pleasure in introducing the second number of the Arusha School Magazine. Once again we owe a great debt to Miss J. M. Elliott, who has acted as Editor.

The first number of the Magazine was very well received. Perhaps this number is not so fully representative of the upper forms of the School, so I hope children in Standards IV and III this year will make every effort to send in contributions for the third publication at the end of 1956.

C. E. Hamshere,

Speech Day was held on December 15. As usual it started at 4 p.m. with the House P.T. Competition, which South House won. This was followed by demonstrations of Cub activities and box horse work by a mixed group of senior children. Visitors were given the now famous School Tea at 4.30 p.m. and then everyone adjourned to the Assembly Hall for speeches and Prize Giving.

In the absence of Bishop Stanway, our Warden, Mr. A. T. Bewes, O.B.E. took the chair. By drawing comparisons with his own school days—shared for a time with Mr. J. V. Shaw, the Deputy Provincial Commissioner who was on the platform—Mr. Bewes considered that children attending Arusha School were very lucky. He referred to the Chain of Office of the Chairman of the Arusha Town Council and explained that he was wearing it because Miss Elliott of the School had been responsible for the design of its seal. He congratulated the School on attaining its 21st Birthday and reminded the children of the well-founded Christian traditions of Arusha School, which he hoped they would observe throughout their lives

In his report the Headmaster referred to the School's Twenty-first Birthday. He reminded the assembly of the farm school opened at Ngare Nairobi in 1928, and the transfer of 33 children and 4 members of the Staff to the new buildings at Arusha in May, 1934. As a contrast there were now 274 pupils and 28 members of Staff.

During the year the Headmaster said there had been a bad epidemic of chickenpox in the 2nd Term, when there had been no less than 80 cases. Good steady work had been done in the classroom. The K.P.E. results had been respectable if not spectacular with all 5 boys passing and 8 out of the 11 girls.

The Headmaster then referred to out-of-school activities. In the 1st Term there had been a successful school play called " The Charcoal Burner's Son," and a visit to Ngorongoro Crater. In the 3rd Term a party of 25 boys had been taken to Nairobi to see the Rugby match between the British Lions and an East African XV. 11 out of 12 boys and girls had successfully " conquered Meru," in the most successful expedition ever. A School Fete had brought in £128 towards the Tennis Court Fund. The Tennis Courts were half finished, and in the stables there were 3 horses on which children were learning to ride.

The Headmaster drew attention to the value of out-of-school activities and interests. He said, " Children who at school have learnt to play the piano or violin, to sing, to act, to dance, to draw and paint, to ride a horse, to swim or play a game, will never wonder what to do with themselves out of working hours when they grow up. What is more, they will have developed a valuable sense of responsibility in looking after their instruments, materials and tools, in keeping appointments and in co-operating with other people. They will be possessors of healthy bodies and healthy minds. In short they will have become the worthy citizens that every country relies upon for its prosperity."

The Headmaster acknowledged his thanks to all members of the Staff. In spite of 4 marriages within the year and one pending they had rendered first-class service. He took the opportunity of congratulating Mr. Bewes on the award of the O.B.E.

The Headmaster's Report was followed by the singing of two Carols by the Junior Choir. Mr. Hocking then spoke briefly on behalf of the Parents Association. Two Carols were rendered by the Senior Choir, after which Mrs. M. J. B. Molohan, wife of the Provincial Commissioner, presented the Prizes.

Extract ID: 5673

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 02-03
Extract Date: 1956


Speech Day ~ Prizes

The awards were :

Form Prizes :

S.F. II : Tonia Hamshere, Lise Larsen, Ann Brooker

S.F. I : John Coutouvidis, Helen Dimitracopoulos, Tony Marchant

Standard IV : David Marsh, Kathryn Littlejohn, Melville Ueckermann

Standard IVA : Hadley Cooper, Bobby van Rooyen, Jacqueline Hudson

Standard III : Sally Read, Erik Jorgensen, Georgina Lambert

Standard MA : Louis van Rooyen, Terence Anthon, Tessa Zaboronek

Standard II : Elizabeth Oglesby, Richard Jaques, Jeanne de la Fontaine

Standard IIA : Mary Sharpe, Daphne Berrington, Francois La Grange

Standard I : Yvonne Fourie, Timothy Hannah, Sally Freyburg

Standard IA : Jill Townsend, Innes Meek, Luciana Cartoni

Kindergarten : Ian Littlejohn, Fiona Masson, Michael Forde

Art and Handwork Prizes :

Art Prizes :

S.F. I and II : David Phibbs, Tonia Hamshere

Standards IV and IVA : Edda von Wedel

Standards III and IIIA : Svend Bayer

Standards II and HA : Paul Wheatcroft

Standard I: Frank Tennent

Standard IA : Vernon Haley

Kindergarten : Stelio Stylianou

Needlework :

S.F. I and II : Hedda Gaetje Standards

IV and IVA : Edda von Wedel

Handwork :

S.F. I and II : David Phibbs, Stephan Wechsler

Standards IV and IVA : Richard Swider, Patrick Mahon

Standards III and IIIA : George Afentakis, Elizabeth Oglesby, Mary Sharpe

Music : Carolyn Pearson, Lise Larsen

Mrs. Brewster's Prizes : Heidi Wolter, Timothy Hannah

Wynn Jones Memorial Scripture Prizes :

S.F. II : Pat Benbow,

S.F. I : John Coutouvidis

Standard IV : Edda von Wedel

Standard IVA : Barend van Wyk

Standard III : David Flatt

Standard IIIA : Phyllis Ulyate

Standard II : Alistair Littlejohn

Standard IIA : Francois Le Grange

Standard I : Janet Payne

Writing Prizes presented by the Parents Association :

S.F. I and II : Ann Brooker

Standards IV and IVA : Marion Cleton

Standards III and IIIA : Susan Phibbs

Nature Study—Mr. Johnston :

S.F. I : Theresa Rarogiewicz

Standards IV and IVA : Melville Ueckermann

Games Prizes :

Senior : Lise Larsen, Stephan Wechsler

Middle : Samuel Kilian, Irena Rybicki

Junior : Yvonne Fourie, Geoffrey Jones

Elocution Prizes :

S.F. II : Gilda Troup

S.F. I : Stephan Wechsler

Standard IV : Felicity Read ;

Standard IVA : Barry Childs

Standard III : Susan Phibbs ;

Standard IIIA : William Palmarini

Standard II : Janka Kolosowski ;

Standard I : Geoffrey Jones

Standard IA : Peter van Rooyen

Headmaster's Prizes : Carolyn Pearson, Tony Coxall

Anne Revington Cup : Lise Larsen.

Selian Cup : Lise Larsen

Du Toit Cup : Tony Coxall

Rasharasha Shield : Jean More and David Phibbs

Lovell Shield for Guides : Kingfisher Patrol

Extract ID: 5674

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 04-05
Extract Date: 1956

Charcoal Burner's Son ~ The Drinking Pool ~ Elocution Contest

The Charcoal Burner's Son

Characters:

The Princess Helen Speed

The Charcoal Burner's Son Melville Ueckermann

The Ogre Robert Gelding

The King Stephan Wechsler

The Dragon Robin Newman

1st Soldier Keith Aberdein

2nd Soldier Micbael Free

Chorus of Soldiers Lise Larsen, Jean More, Nelia de Beer, Anna de Beer, Mary Wechsler, John Boswell, Rodney Holland, Robin Ulyate

On April 1, 1955, the pupils of Arusha School performed " The Charcoal Burner's Son " by L. du Garde Peach and Victor Hely Hutchinson, for the entertainment of the people of Arusha.

The play consisted of five leading characters : the Princess, the King, the Ogre, the Charcoal Burner's Son and the Dragon. There was also a chorus of soldiers who made up the army and sang some very comical songs which greatly amused the audience.

The Princess sang very delightfully and was greatly applauded as also were the King and the Charcoal Burner's Son. These three had many different solos to sing and aided by the chorus helped to make the play a great success.

We heartily congratulate Mrs. Joy, our Music Mistress, who conducted the singing, and Miss Robertson who produced the play. We also congratulate Miss Elliott who painted all the scenery which made the stage look very colourful.

The scenery consisted of two large trees, a very impressive-looking castle which belonged to the Ogre, and a hill on which the castle was situated. The whole stage looked as if it were in fairyland.

Jean More Aged 12 years

The Elocution Contest

Our annual Elocution Contest was held in the second term of the year. It began on July 14 with the Junior classes competing for a huge cake. Standard 1 won this, having acted " Little Black Sambo " very well.

The Elocution continued with the middle school competing for a silver candlestick. Standard 2 came top in this section. Their play " The Discontented Fir Tree " was about a tree who wanted different leaves. In the end he saw that other leaves had their drawbacks, so he asked for his needles to be returned, and all ended well.

Standard 4 and 4A, Secondary Forms 1 and 2 competed for the remaining candlestick. Secondary Form 2 and Standard 4 shared the honour of the prize. Secondary Form 2 acted the trial scene from " The Merchant of Venice," in which Jean More as Antonio, Gilda Troup as Gratiano, Ann Brooker as Portia and Michael Free as Shylock acted very well.

I think the Elocution Contest was a success, and we all enjoyed watching little plays instead of listening to the usual recitations.

Vanessa Hocking Aged 10 years

Extract ID: 5675

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 06-07
Extract Date: 1956

St Mary's Square ~ Guides ~ Scouts and Cubs ~ Swimming

St. Mary's Square

Amid the beauties of Venice, with its quaint old houses and picturesque gondolas, that travel under bridges and through narrow alleys, lies St. Mark's Square. Pigeons flutter round the domes and steeples of the peaceful churches and mix with the gathering crowds of sightseers. Dark Italians with their children, chattering away to their friends, are a common sight. The' Doge's Palace can be seen in the distance with its green, domed roof. St. Mark's is near the statibn, but on the Grand Canal and to get there one goes by water-bus or by gondola. On either side lie shops.

Looking at the exterior of the church for the first time gives one a great thrill, for it is very old and beautiful. The massive wooden doors, with the people thronging in and out, are the very safeguard of the church.

Inside, the roof is decorated with wonderful paintings, stretching far and wide. The wooden seats are deep and strong upon the cold stone floor. One part of the church is undergoing repair. The altar is of pure gold, a nd is embedded in a glass case at the far end of the church. On the left side is another altar, lighted dimly with candles. Everything inside is dim and slightly musty. Out through the exit and into the brilliant sunshine, one emerges, feeling a little dazed, but pleased.

Christine Clogger Aged 12 years

Guides

The 1st Arusha Company has been in existence for many years. Miss Lovell is now our Captain but our former Captain was Mrs. Jenkinson.

We have had great excitement this year. At the beginning the guides went on a picnic with our Captain along the river. We made fires and generally had good fun.

In the second term of this year we marched in the parade on Queen's Day and also on the Remembrance of the Battle of Britain Sunday.

We have a guide house and each patrol has its own corner which we find very useful.

We are going on another picnic with our Captain and we know it will be a success like the last one.

We wish Miss Lovell, our Captain, great luck in her guiding.

Helen Landcastle

Scouts and Cubs

There have been some eighteen scouts in the troop this year. Of last year's scouts only five were left, so most of the first term was taken up with Tenderfoot Tests. Each week the scout hour has begun with the Flag Break and most weeks a scout has been invested. Usually a short time has been spent in instruction in some kind of scout-craft before either doing some practical scout work or playing a " wide " game. Twice a rope bridge has been built across the swimming pool. On the second occasion a guide who happened to be passing, volunteered to cross and to the great enjoyment of the troop fell in. Still, it was her turn to laugh when the bridge broke and in fell a scout.

A weekend camp was held in the third term at Mr. Hinds's farm at Ngongongare. Practically the whole troop attended, enjoyed the camp and came home tired and sunburnt. The bathing was great fun and the efforts to dam a small stream were strenuous if somewhat futile.

Each Wednesday the Cubs' yell has continued to be heard coming from the old tennis court. Much better progress has been made this year in the passing of tests. By the end of the year nearly all the cubs will have got " one eye open." Cock fighting still is the favourite team game, and it is always " Let's have Mau Mau and Police " when it is time for wide games.

W. E. Morgan

Swimming Sports

The School House Swimming Sports were held in the first term of 1955. There were all the usual races and diving and also a bedtime race in which the competitors had to swim with a lighted candle. Another amusing race was the obstacle race, and diving for stones always causes great excitement.

Outstanding swimmers in both Houses were : Gilda Troup, David Phibbs and Jean More in North House, and Lise Larsen, Michael Aylward and Stephan Wechsler in South House, all of whom have won their swimming colours.

The Swimming Shield was won by South House, who beat North by only a few points. At the end of the sports Mr. Hamshere and Mr. Johnston appeared at the edge of the pool dressed as two old ladies in peculiar hats and frilly dresses. They both stood shivering at the end of the pool, but finally they jumped in, losing their hats as they swam around.

The sports were very enjoyable and we all hope next year's Swimming Sports will prove as interesting as these.

Lise Larsen Aged 12 years

Extract ID: 5676

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 08-09
Extract Date: 1956

Swimming ~ Cinema ~ The Deserted Garden ~ Longing

Swimming

During the year the following Tanganyika Schools' Swimming Certificates have been gained.

Second Class : Anna de Beer, Nelia de Beer, Rodney Holland, David Phibbs, Peter Rhodes-Jones, Klaus Gaetje, Raymond Timms, Barry Childs, Bobby van Rooyen, Teresa Rarogiewicz, Hedda Gaetje, Richard Jacobs, Robin Ulyate, Rodney Williams, John Boswell, John Coutouvidis, Robin Gemmel!, Tony Marchant, Edda von Wedel, Ann Boswell, Michael Webster, Brian Merson, Robert Gelding, Melville Ueckermann, Peter Davies.

First Class : Helen Landcastle, Jean More, Gilda Troup, Tony Coxall, Mary Wechsler, Stephan Wechsler.

Senior Class : Lise Larsen, Michael Aylward.

A Visit to the Cinema

On Wednesday, June 1, the two top classes of the school went to see the film " Romeo and Juliet."

The parts were chosen very well, except that I should have liked to see Lawrence Olivier play the part of Romeo, instead of Lawrence Harvey, although he acted very well. The part of Juliet was aoted perfectly by Susan Shentall and Flora Robson played the part of her affectionate nurse.

Some of the scenes were tragic and some were quite amusing or peaceful. One of the scenes I enjoyed most was when Friar Lawrence was picking flowers in the early morning. I thought it was rather frightening when Juliet was alone in her bedroom trying to make up her mind to drink the drug, and I was positively terrified when Romeo was down in the vault. The balcony scene was a little long, and, not knowing the story properly, I thought Romeo was going to be captured.

The last scene when Romeo was in the vault with the sleeping Juliet, was frightening, especially when you could see Tybalt lying there with blood on his clothes; and I was hoping that Friar Lawrence would come down into the vault in time to rescue them.

Although some of the words were blurred, the film was very good and I should like to see it again to understand it better.

Vanessa Hocking Aged 10 years

Extract ID: 5677

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 10-11
Extract Date: 1956

Sports Day ~ The Nativity ~ Wills Curiosity Shop ~ Hockey

Extract ID: 5678

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 12-13
Extract Date: 1956

Riding ~ The Choir ~ The Clipper

Extract ID: 5679

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 12a
Extract Date: 1956

The Last Fence ~ The Trumpeter

Extract ID: 5680

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Extract Author: Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

School Trip to Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of the journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we still had sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night was very queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming outside! When I woke up in the morning I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the [Ngorongoro] crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants and buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. I eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded at my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater which we had just visited.

authors were probably about eleven years old

Extract ID: 739

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

Swan Lake ~ Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of our journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we had still sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-Wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last, in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night I felt queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming about outside! When I woke up in the morning, I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2,000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants or buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. 1 eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded in my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater, which we had just visited.

Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson

Extract ID: 5681

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 14-15
Extract Date: 1956

Westminster Abbey ~ Netball ~ The Sea at Night ~ The Vulture

Extract ID: 5682

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 16-17
Extract Date: 1956

Rugger ~ Treasures of the Sea ~ My Earlist Memories

Extract ID: 5683

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 18-19
Extract Date: 1956

Drought ~ The School Fete ~ British Lions vs. East Africa

Extract ID: 5684

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 20-21
Extract Date: 1956

Self-Sacrifice ~ Hidden Gold ~ Meru

Meru

As usual during the third term, six boys, six girls and six adults set off to climb Meru on December 3. As has happened before, the lorry had difficulty in getting to Olkokola, but we were not delayed long for a tractor and trailer came to our rescue.

Leaving a party behind to prepare a meal, we started climbing from Olkokola at 2.30 p.m. It was hot work walking through the forest, but the only real difficulty was in negotiating the Olmotoni valley as its sides were very slippery. We came to the camping spot above the forest at 5.30 p.m., and by the time it was dark, firewood had been collected and we were eating a nourishing meal of soup and steak. After songs around the fire we tried to get some sleep which for most of us was impossible owing to the cold.

At 4.15 a.m. after a light breakfast we left the camp and started to climb the mountain which towered above us like a giant in the dark sky. Finding the ash frozen helped us to make good progress, and by sunrise we were well ahead of the usual time and reached Luncheon Rock. Near the top, going became very difficult because of the snow and ice. However, by 10 a.m. the whole party, except one who had turned back at the crater lip, had reached the top.

Away to the East, Kibo and Mawenzi stood clear above the clouds and looking down we had a magnificent view of the crater. For a short time we were able to look down at Arusha and pick out the school, but to the West and North clouds blocked our view. By the time we left the summit the snow and ice had thawed, and it was difficult to get a foot-hold.

Just after leaving the top one of the boys was hit by a rolling boulder and had to be carried down to the base camp, and then to Arusha. After descending some thousand feet, we found the ash soft and the going was easier and we reached the camp by lunch-time.

After a rest and a meal we packed up the camp and started down the forest, and by 4 p.m. we were at Olkokola enjoying a hot Irish stew. While we had been up the mountain it had rained hard on the Olkokola road, and on our way down we found a lorry stuck in the mud. After waiting some time for the lorry to pass we arrived in Arusha, at 8 p.m.

It had been a good trip and a record number of children had conquered Meru, and though tired, everybody thought that their efforts had been well worth while.

David Phibbs Aged 12 years

Extract ID: 5685

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1956 February
Page Number: 22-23
Extract Date: 1956

A Ride on the Winged Horse ~ To "Cloudy" ~ Stamps ~ The Thunderstorm

TO " CLOUDY "

In my heart there lives a memory of your dear face,

In my mind there is ever a kindly thought of you,

Your strong duty to your God, your service and your grace.

May we live for Him, inspired by your life anew.

In our school you worked with all the little girls and boys,

Showed them kindness, how to live together, how to pray,

Loved them like a mother, shared their sorrows and their joys.

They will not forget you or the things you used to say.

ANON

In memory of Sister Gertrude Cloudsdale, Senior Matron, Arusha School 1945-49.

Extract ID: 5686
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