Arusha School Magazine

Arusha School Magazine

1957 March

Book ID 681

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March

Crest

Extract ID: 3933

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Extract Author: Cyril Hampshere
Page Number: 01
Extract Date: 1957

Preface ~ Speech Day

In introducing the third number of the Arusha School Magazine I have some sad news to announce : Miss Elliott is leaving us. She has been responsible for starting the Magazine and editing the first three numbers. Recently she has not been well and this, together with other considerations, has decided her to return to teaching in the United Kingdom.

We shall miss her very much and I know that we would all like to thank her warmly for all she has done at Arusha and wish her good luck at home.

There is now a breach into which somebody. I know, will step.

In this number the highlight is the visit of H.R.H. Princess Margaret to Arusha and the School last October. There are many other events recorded about which I am sure you will enjoy reading.

Extract ID: 5687

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 02-03
Extract Date: 13 December 1956

Speech Day

The Speech Day proceedings opened on a hot afternoon with the usual P.T. Competion and Displays. After the visitors had been entertained at the now famous Arusha School Tea, everybody squeezed into the Assembly Hall —and it is a squeeze these days — for the Speeches and Prize Giving.

In the absence in Australia of the Warden, Bishop Stanway, Mr. A. T. Bewes, O.B.E., took the chair. After a brief introductory speech, Mr. Bewes called on the Headmaster to make his Report.

In his speech the Headmaster mentioned that the number of children had crossed the 300 mark for the first time in the School's history and that there were 122 day children which was a record. The health record had been good as the year had passed without an epidemic.

"In the classroom I think the greatest advance has been in the opening of Kindergarten II half-way through the 1st Term. It fills a need we have felt for over two years and should help forward enormously those day children who join us at the age of five. By the end of Kindergarten II a bright child will be very nearly as advanced as those formerly leaving Standard I, with the result that the syllabus can be extended and the standard of work raised. And here I should like to digress and say how encouraging :t has been to receive progress reports of former pupils now at school in the United Kingdom, who have been found to be quite up to, and in some cases ahead of, children of their own age educated at home. This, of course, refers to bright children only and bears out what I have always said: that provided a child starts school at five out here and suffers no serious interruptions, our schools in Tanganyika give him as good a primary education as he can find at home."

"We have taken our last Kenya Preliminary Examination. It would have been gratifying to have been able to tell you that the results were the best we have had, but this was not to be and I expected it. Because it was the last chance for Tanganyika children to qualify for admission to Kenya Secondary Schools, we entered all who had the faintest chance of being accepted, with the result that four out of five girls have been offered places and two out of four boys. Margaret Masson did very well, being placed 7th out of 379 girls who sat, with 453 marks out of a possible 600."

"Out of the classroom we have been as busy as usual, with Concerts, the Elocution Contest, Games and Swimming. It was unfortunate that the Inter-School Sports had to be cancelled this year, but we at last succeeded in arranging a visit from the Nairobi Primary School. Twenty-five of their children spent the Easter week-end with us and engaged in a series of Hockey Matches and a Swimming Contest with us. The visitors were successful in everything, but we were unashamed and learnt a lot from our friends.

"One tennis court has been put into commission this term, and the second is nearly finished. Now we should like come help in coaching tennis from residents of Arusha! Riding is flourishing and there are at present six horses in our stables. I am most grateful to Mrs. Sykes for the help she has given with riding lessons this term. If anybody else would like to help, their assistance too would be greatly appreciated.

"We have a rather diminished Guide Company, two Brownie Packs and a Pack of Wolf Cubs. Once again our thanks are due to Mrs. McClement and Miss Ann Lovell for their great help with the Guides.

"This year our Meru Expedition scored a 100% success with all 13 children reaching the summit, the first time this has been achieved. We were lucky with the weather, enjoying perfect climbing conditions. We were greatly helped as usual by Mr. Mahon and the Olkokola Syndicate, and in particular Mr. Sekunda who lent his house to our base party. We thank him and Mr. Mahon most warmly.

"But the greatest event of the year was the visit in October of H.R.H. Princess Margaret. Of all the people in Arusha, I think our children received the greatest thrill, for not only did we share in all the public functions — we were privileged to have Her Royal Highness to ourselves for a precious quarter of an hour, and in being the only European School in East Africa to be accorded this honour we are very proud indeed. I know the children will long remember the sight of the gracious, utterly lovely and superbly regal figure that passed through this Hall. I am sure that the hands of the lucky few who were presented still tingle and 1 know that all our hearts are warm as the result of the Royal Visit."

The Headmaster referred to the addition of the new Staff Room and Art Room. He paid a warm tribute to the Staff, although as far as weddings were concerned he regretted to announce that they had not done as well as in 1955. He also congratulated the children on their excellent behaviour and thanked the parents of all children for their great co-operation.

Mrs. J. V. Shaw, wife of the Acting Provincial Commissioner, then presented the Prizes.

Extract ID: 5688

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 04-05
Extract Date: December 13, 1956

Prize List 1956

S.F. II

Margaret Masson

Aspasia Aslanis

S.F. I

Hadley Cooper

Brian Ulyate

Ronald Coxall

STANDARD IV

Joan Brewster

Erik Kullander

Susan Phibbs

STANDARD NA

Louis van Rooyen

Tessa Zaboronek

Yvonne Escott

STANDARD III

Ann Currie

Pamela Jeffery

Penelope Leslie

STANDARD IIIA

James Hallowes

Mary Sharp

Anna Aslanis

STANDARD II

Jennifer Kennedy

Julia Leslie

Jill Townsend

STANDARD IIA

Ian Fraser

Sally Ulyate

Leslie Haigh

STANDARD I

Penny Read

Geraldine Collings

Kirsten Jorgensen

ART AND H/WORK

David Woodbridge

STANDARD IA

Rognida Mogilnicki

Jan van Emmenis

Adriaan van Schoor

ART AND H/WORK

Trevor Pienaar

KINDERGARTEN II

Peter French

Fiona Masson

Daphne Eustace

ART AND H/WORK

Jonathan Snaith

KINDERGARTEN I

Alison Gunn

Wendy Brewster

David Sutherland

ART PRIZES

S.F. I and II

Teresa Rarogiewicz

IV and IVA Svend Bayer

III and IIIA Martin Guy

II and IIA

Jimmy Snee

NEEDLEWORK

S.F. I and II

Aspasia Aslanis

IV and IVA

Cathryn Berrington

PIANO

Cathryn Berrington Mary Adendorff

MRS. BREWSTER'S PIANO

Heidi Wolter

Penny Read

HANDWORK

S.F. II — Melville Ueckermann

S.F. I -- Hume Townsend

IV — Erik Jorgensen

IVA — Samuel Kilian

III — Jeanne de la Fontaine

IIIA — James Hallowes

II — Sally Freyburg

IIA — Elena Cuirleo

SCRIPTURE

S.F.II — John Hazel

S.F. I — Charles Hallowes

IV — Martin Darling

IVA — Marina Brink

III — Penny Leslie

IIIA — Ronnie Taylor

II — Geoffrey Jones

IIA — Ian Fraser

I — Meloena Didham

IA — Merlyn Holmes

NATURE STUDY

S.F. I and II — Erika Wolter

IV and IVA — Eugenia Sharpe

GAMES

SENIOR:

Margrit von Lekow

George Afentakis

MIDDLE :

Georgina Lambert

Geoffrey Jones

JUNIOR :

Sally Ulyate

Ryszard Bursztyn

ELOCUTION

.F. II — Valerie Ulyate, Marion Cleton

S.F. I — Margaret Hubbard

IV — Susan Phibbs

IVA — William Palmarini

III — Alison Bewes

IIIA — Peter Jones

II — Catherine Howard

IIA — Massy Swynnerton

I — Victoria Burnett

IA — Rognida Mogilnicki

HEADMASTER'S PRIZES

Margaret Masson

Valerie Ulyate

RASHA RASHA SHIELD

Valerie Ulyate

Melville Ueckermann

ANNE REVINGTON CUP

Teresa Rarogiewicz

DU TOIT CUP

Melville Ueckermann

SELIAN CUP

Robin Gemmell

LOVELL SHIELD FOR GUIDES

Daffodil Patrol

CUPS AND SHIELDS

Swimming — South

Hockey — North

Net ball — South

Soccer — North

Cricket — North

P.T. — North

Rounders — North

Honour — North

Extract ID: 5689

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 06-07
Extract Date: 1957

Princess Margaret ~ Autumn ~ Red Cross Fete ~ Swimming

My First Glimpse of Princess Margaret

Children with flags in their hands, chatted to one another, waiting impatiently for the arrival of Princess Margaret.

There was still a quarter of an hour left, but slowly the minutes ticked off, one by one, and at last cheers could be heard from the crowd as a grey car with the Governor and Princess Margaret drove slowly by. The Princess looked very beautiful, and she was wearing a charming blue dress and hat. She waved her hand as the crowd cheered louder and louder. We all waved our flags as hard as we could and shouted at the tops of our voices.

As the cheers near us slowly died away, I could hear other cheers in the upper street where the Guides and more Europeans stood. We waited for all the cars to pass by, which were coming from the Airport, but they never seemed to finish. At last a Policeman stopped the cars so that we could pass. We reached the entrance to the school drive where the letters at the top of a huge arch stood boldly welcoming the Princess. We stopped and some children collected our flags. We then ran into our dormitories merrily. I could not believe that I had really seen Princess Margaret. But I was still happy because the next day we would go to the Baraza and see her more clearly. Princess Margaret was the first member of the Royal Family I had ever seen.

Aspasia Aslanis 13 years

THE RED CROSS FETE

On June 30th we had the Red Cross Fκte held in the School grounds. In the morning the School children helped set up some of the stalls. When the afternoon came we all had a lovely time looking round the various stalls and especially waiting to have rides on the school horses. There was a film called "Abbot and Costello" and a fortune teller named "Madame Zodiac". The stalls which contributed the largest amount to the total, were the bottle-stall, the cakes and sweets stall and also the book stall where many children bought annuals and other story books.

The Red Cross Fκte was a big success and everybody enjoyed it very much.

Janet Simpson 12 years

SWIMMING SPORTS

The Swimming Sports, as usual, were held in the first term of the year on Saturday, 24th March, 1956. This year the Swimming Shield was won by South House who beat North House by only a few points.

There were all the usual events including style diving, and Breast stroke style. One event which caused great excitement was the Obstacle Race, in which competitors had to go to the bottom of the pool and bring up a stone and put it out on the edge. Then they had to go through a tyre, swim to the shallow end and blow a balloon until it burst. Lastly they had to eat a banana off a plate and bring the plate with the banana peel back to the deep end. There were sixteen events altogether most of which were speed races.

Outstanding swimmers in both houses were Edda von Wedel, Robin Gemmell and Susan Phibbs in North House, and Margaret von Lekow, John Boswell, and Anna Shute in South House, all of whom have won their colours.

The Sports ended with the presentation of the Swimming Shield. Mr. Hamshere asked Mrs. White to present the Shield to John Boswell of South House.

EIRA Jones

Extract ID: 5690

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 08-09
Extract Date: 1957

Football ~ Piano Recital

FOOTBALL

Football was played, as usual, in the second term of the year. The senior match was played on the 10th July.

North had the kick off, and in the first half scored five goals. In the second half, two goals were scored by North, making a total score of seven goals to South's nil. The outstanding players were George Afentakis, Melville Ueckermann, Ronald Coxall, Patrick Mahon and Robin Gemmell.

The Captain of the South was Melville Ueckermann and the Captain of the North was Robin Gemmell.

The Junior match was played on the 12th July. The Captain of the South was Eric Kullander, and the Captain of the North was Erik Jorgensen. The game was won by North. In the first half North scored one goal. At the end of the game the score was 2-0 to North. The outstanding players were Kevin Loxham, Eric Kullander, Erik Jorgensen, Ferruccio Palmarini and John Hazel.

North had won both matches so they won the Challenge Cup.

Robin GEMMELL 13 years

Piano Recital by Ian Houston

On Saturday, June 16th, Arusha School was honoured by a visit from Ian Houston, a young Nairobi pianist. The first piece of music he played, was called "Presto". It was an exciting and thrilling piece, composed by Galuppi. He also played a Polonaise in A minor by Chopin and various pieces by Rachmaninov. We were very interested to hear two Bagatelles which Ian Houston had composed himself. Altogether his playing was most enjoyable and we called him back for several encores. At the end of the performance some of us asked him for his autograph, before he left to give a concert at the Little Theatre.

Marion Cleton 12 years.

Extract ID: 5692

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 08-09
Extract Date: 1987

The Royal Visit to Arusha School

The Royal Visit to Arusha School

On the 17th October we were greatly honoured by having a visit to the Arusha School from Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret. We had already seen her driving round the town, but this was a special occasion for all the school.

In the Junior Hall were assembled children from the Hellenic, South African and Kongwa Schools, and of course the whole of our school. Everybody waited impatiently for about half an hour, then at last the news arrived that the Princess was coming. Slowly her car came down the road and turned off into the Junior School drive where Mr. Hamshere and various other people were awaiting her.

The Princess was dressed in a lovely yellow evening gown. As she entered the Hall she was greeted with three cheers from everyone and as she made her way towards the stage she stopped and smiled radiantly at us. She then slowly and gracefully mounted the steps on to the school stage. When she had sat down a bouquet was presented to her by Penny Steel. The three schools, the Greek, the South African and our own then sang different songs, ours being "Land of our Birth". After the singing the presentations took place and I felt very excited for I was one of the chosen few to be presented. The moment when I shook hands with the Princess is one that I shall always remember. After the presentations Mr. Hamshere asked the Princess to sign our Visitors Book, and after writing her name in it, she asked if we could all have a holiday on the following day. There was a tremendous uproar as this announcement was made, and the Princess, turning towards us, looked very amused as she waved us goodbye.

Valerie Ulyate, Head Girl 13 years

Extract ID: 5691

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 10-11
Extract Date: 1957

Hockey ~ The Baraza ~ Caught by the Tide

HOCKEY

Hockey is played in the first term of every school year and we have matches every Friday against the Gymkhana Club. On Monday 26th March the girls team from South House played against North House in order to compete for the Hockey Cup. North won with five goals to four. On the 27th March the boys played their match, North winning this also. On Wednesday there was a mixed match with boys and girls from each House opposing each other. Some outstanding players in these games were, Edda von Wedel, Valerie Ulyate, Susan Phibbs, George Afentakis, Margrit von Lekow and Heather Lamont. Edda who is in North House shot all the goals for North with the aid of Susan Phibbs and Susan Meyer.

As North won both the girls and the boys matches they win the Hockey Cup for this year.

EIRA Jones 12 years

The Baraza

My first impression of the Baraza was of crowds and crowds of people. There were Europeans, Asians and many African tribes gathered there to see Princess Margaret all looking very gay and colourful in their tribal costumes. It was a lovely morning and the mountain rose high above the scene. There were many newspaper reporters and photographers all eager to obtain reports or photos of the Princess and they crowded round the Royal Dais. We were very lucky because we were sitting right in front of the Dais. Her Royal Highness wore a blue dress and a white hat. She arrived in a Humber Snipe. When she was on the Dais a chief, named Amri Dodo, made a speech. After that she made her speech, in which she mentioned how pleased she was to see so many children. Then the presentations were made, after which a Land Rover came along and the Princess drove round the arena through the cheering crowds. She stood up so that everyone could see her. She then went back to the Governor's Lodge.

Melville Ueckermann 12 years

Extract ID: 5693

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 12-13
Extract Date: 1957

Netball ~ The Desert ~ A visit from Nairobi Primary School

A Visit from the Nairobi Primary School

At the end of the first term, Mr. Hamshere invited a party of boys and girls from the Nairobi Primary School to stay at the Arusha School. There were twenty four children in all, twelve boys and twelve girls.

They arrived on Thursday evening, 29th March, at half past five. Two teachers came with them, Miss Kane and Mr. Sentence. Some of them were accommodated in the Sanatorium, some in the girls and some in the boys buildings. After supper the boys played table tennis in their common room, while the girls had dancing in the Junior Hall. On Friday we went to Church, for a special Good Friday Service. After break we all had a free swim, which the N.P.S. enjoyed very much. After tea the girls and boys matches were played and the N.P.S. won both. On Saturday morning we played two mixed matches and again the N.P.S. children won. In the afternoon a Swimming Gala was held. This was a very close finish, the N.P.S. beating Arusha School by one mark only, 50.5 marks to 49.5 It was a very enjoyable afternoon and excitement reached fever pitch as the marks grew closer and closer.

After tea we all went to see the Rugger Match. Later that evening there was a film about a dog called "Lucky". On Sunday we went to Church for the usual Easter morning service.

The Staff versus the children match was played at halfpast eleven that morning, the Staff won, with a score of two goals to one. In the afternoon the N.P.S. girls and boys went to Ngurdoto Crater, and also five of our school. We went in a lorry and the School car. We started off about halfpast two. Soon we reached Usa Saw Mills which is not far from the Crater. It was about quarter past three when we started climbing and the road was very slippery. Very soon we reached the summit of the Crater. We had two Game Scouts with us and they gave us two pairs of binoculars. We had our tea at the summit and saw quite a lot of game, rhino, warthog and herds of buffalo. At halfpast five we started down. It seemed more slippery than before. We all got very muddy and we arrived back at school very late. After breakfast on Monday the N.P.S. left. This visit was very enjoyable for both schools and we hope they will pay another visit soon.

Marion Cleton

EIRA Jones

Extract ID: 5694

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 14
Extract Date: 1957

Elocution Contest ~ Wild Horses ~ Marsh Visitors

THE ELOCUTION CONTEST

This year, the Elocution Contest was held on July 11th and 13th, when we were entertained by some short scenes. All classes la upwards competed. The Junior section included classes la, 1 and 2a. 2a won with a play called "Dr. Screwbones". Leslie Haigh was the doctor, who had invented a machine which would cure everybody, whatever their disease. We saw it being tried out successfully on many different types of people.

The next section included Standards 2, 3a and 3. Standard 3 won with an amusing play called "On the Lawn". Three children were trying to think of something amusing to play, when some Crusaders marched on. The three children thought they would like to be Crusaders, but when they heard of the dangers, they changed their minds. When the Crusaders left, some Turks arrived, and told their story. The Children then decided they would rather play their own games, and so the play ended.

The senior section was won by Secondary Form 2, who acted extracts from "As you Like It" by William Shakespeare. The scene was set in the Forest of Arden and all the main characters, Rosalind, Celia, Orlando and Adam were seen making their way to the Forest where they met Duke Senior, the banished duke.

Altogether it was a very enjoyable contest.

David Marsh 11 years

Extract ID: 5695

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 14a
Extract Date: 1957

The Mountain Lake ~ Shade at Noon

Extract ID: 5696

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 15
Extract Date: 1957

The Silent Deep ~ In the Ants Nest

Extract ID: 5697

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 16-17
Extract Date: 1957

Girl Guides ~ Gedi Ruins ~ Cubs ~ The Choir

GIRL GUIDES

At school we have Guides every Tuesday. Mrs. McClement is our Captain, and Miss Lovell is our Lieutenant.

Each Patrol keeps its own corner, and this year we have been winning points. Daffodil Patrol have the most. On Speech Day the patrol that has most points will win the Guides Shield.

Every term we go for a picnic. We have to cook and after lunch we play games. This year we went near Lake Duluti.

Every year we have to go to the Gymkhana Field for the Parade on the Queen's Birthday and also on Remembrance Day. This year we had a very special event, the Royal Visit of Princess Margaret and we all went to the Baraza.

I hope that Mrs. McClement will be our Captain for a long time.

Aspasia Aslanis 13 years

Gedi Ruins

One day when we were at Malindi we decided to go and see the Arab City of Gedi. The first thing we saw, was a monument with Arab writing on it. It was marked AH 802, which means AD. 1399. The city was enclosed by a wall of which very little is now left. The great Mosque of Juma can be seen, as the Royal National Parks have cleaned it. The Arab women of Gedi still go there to worship.

I liked the old trees that grow over the ruins. Then we went to see the Museum which had pots, bracelets, beads and big plates. After that we went swimming in the Blue Lagoon.

Phyllis Ulyate 11 years

CUBS

This year, as the number of boys in the school of over eleven was small, the Scout Troop was discontinued and in its place we have an extra Cub Pack. Each Pack has four sixes and the peace ( ?) of the School's Wednesday afternoons has been shattered by not one, but two, yells.

Nearly all the senior pack have obtained their first star, some in the second Pack have done so too, and some twenty badges have been passed, mostly swimmers and athletes. At the close of nearly every meeting the Packs have combined to play some wide and very wild games.. `Mau-Mau and Police' still is the favourite though the `Macgregors and the Red Coats' rivalled it for a few weeks after "Rob Roy" had come to our local picture house.

For the visit of H.R.H. Princess Margaret, the Cubs paraded twice, looking very smart. First we helped to line the route on her arrival and then at the Baraza we again paraded as part of the Scout contingent. On the first occasion we had but a fleeting view, but on the second we were right in the front.

Miss Tighe, who has been in charge of the Second Pack is leaving us this term. We thank her for her help and wish her the best of luck in her life in New Zealand.

W.E.M.

THE CHOIR

At the beginning of the year Mrs. Brewster selected a new Choir, consisting of fifteen boys and about twenty girls. Throughout the year the choir has sung an "Introit" in Church every Sunday. My favourite is "Lord receive us with Thy Blessing". We have also sung "God is a Spirit" and "Lead me Lord". In the third term of the year the choir had a new mistress named Miss Bassant. When the Princess came to the school, the choir was highly honoured for they sang a verse by themselves in the song called "Land of our Birth". Also before the banquet started in our Main Dining Hall, we sang a grace in Latin. It was one verse only, but it took several weeks to learn, for it was in Latin.

— A CHOIRBOY

Extract ID: 5698

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 18-19
Extract Date: 1957

Carols by Candlelight ~ Under Water Life ~ A Jouney from London to Nairobi

A Journey from London to Nairobi

"All passengers for Coronet Flight 161, please," said an air hostess.

I picked up my camera and comics and walked out to the standing plane. With gathering speed the plane took off, and in a few minutes we were over the Weald. As we crossed the Channel we saw a steamer heading for Dover.

The plane had been over France for half an hour when a jet roared beneath us. I do not know what kind was.

An hour or so after this incident, we crossed the River Rhone, which was glittering in the morning sun.

In a few hours I caught sight of the Alps with Mont Blanc looming in the distance. We flew through a cloud and over a black looking mountain. The Alps faded away as we crossed the little Island of Elba, and Corsica was on the horizon. It was afternoon as we landed at Rome.

While in Rome we saw a turbo-prop, which made a high squealing noise as it took off.

We then flew over the Mediterranean Sea into the evening light. From up above the sunset looked wonderful.

Darkness fell and the lights were at half power for people to sleep. A red glow from the exhaust made but little light in the darkness. I fell into a fitful sleep but was woken at Cairo where we landed at 9.15 local time. The lights of Cairo glittered as we landed. We saw a film about Egypt progressing in the world while we drank our coffee.

After a four hour run, we flew low over the Nile into Khartoum. It was 3.15 a.m. on the airport clock as we entered the cafι. We were again served coffee by Sudanese.

We flew on into the dawn and early morning, until Lake Victoria came in sight. We went over Lake Victoria, banked and swooped down to land at Entebbe. After a short wait, we took off on the last lap of our journey, on over Lake Victoria, over islands small and big, over the Rift Valley to Nairobi, where we landed at 2 o'clock local time,

JOHN Hazel 12 years

Extract ID: 5699

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 20-21
Extract Date: 1957

The Ghost ~ Night Walk ~ My Story

Extract ID: 5700

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 22-23
Extract Date: 1957

My Favourite Animal ~ Meru Expedition

Meru Expedition

This year the Meru Expedition started on Saturday, 1st December. In all there were thirteen children and seven members of staff climbing.

The road to Olkokola was fairly good, although two lorries stuck in the mud a couple of times. At Olkokola we had our lunch which consisted of sandwiches, fruit and a cup of tea. We then left the Base Camp and made our way to the edge of the forest.

Our way through the Forest was very beautiful with large open green glades here and there. Several people saw a herd of about twenty or thirty Eland, and we also heard Colobus Monkeys. The trees were covered with old man's beard. The weather this year was absolutely wonderful and we could see for miles around us. Going up the Elephant Slide was very steep and slippery. After a short rest we set to work finding firewood for our fire. For supper we had tomato soup, sausages, fried steak and bread and butter. We then all gathered round the fire and passed our time singing songs. For some of us the night seemed endless, until, at last, at half past three we were woken and after folding our blankets and having coffee and Ryvita we set out at four o'clock to climb the rest of the mountain.

As dawn broke we separated into little groups, and we could see the shadow of Meru against the sky as the sun appeared. We now came to the sandy part which was the most difficult of all because it was very slippery. The early morning frost covered the ground and made our toes feel like ice blocks. About seven fortyfive we started climbing the rocks which was great fun. Underneath were blocks of ice, which were very refreshing to eat.

The first people to reach the top were Mr. Morgan and Jacqueline Hudson. About seven minutes later Theresa Rarogiewicz and Janet Simpson clambered up. The last party arrived at nearly half past ten. Most of us stayed at the top until five to eleven.

At eleven we all started charging down the mountain like a herd of elephants. We reached the camp at about half past twelve, where there was a meal waiting for us. At one o'clock we started on our way back through the Forest and arrived at the base camp at half past two We arrived at school at a quarter past six, much earlier than we were expected.

Valerie Ulyate 13 years

Extract ID: 5701

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 24-25
Extract Date: 1957

The Arab ~ Local Study by Std IV

LOCAL STUDY BY STD. IV

Local Study is done in the third term of the year and only by Standards IV and Iva. Before we went out for local study we were divided into four groups with about six people to each group and we usually go out on a Thursday morning. The first time I went on local study was September 27th, 1956, when we went on a Township Survey. Each group leader chose two people to study a road one on each side. We had to see what the name of the shop was and what it sold, and then write it down in our book. The next place we went to was Daresco which is owned by Mr. Bayer. Daresco supplies the electricity for the whole town.

The same day we went to Amekas Macaroni Industry, which is owned by Mr. Stylianou. We saw the macaroni going through different kinds of pipes and machines, and Mr. Stylianou gave us a box of macaroni.

The next week was very exciting because we went to Oljoro for the day in a lorry. We went to three farms and went to a cattle auction and we had a picnic by a river. Then we went to Mr. Boardman's house where we had tea and a fishing contest. The next week we went to the Police Headquarters where we met Mr. Clogger who talked about the Police, then we went up to the Boma and had our finger prints taken, and looked round the Boma. The next Thursday we went to the P.W.D. which stands for Public Works Department, and we were shown round by Mr. Patient.

The next time we went on local study we went to the Town Hall where Mr. Green, the town clerk, talked to us about government. The next week we went to the Town Hall again. Then the last week we had on local study we went to the Boma again and were shown round by Mr. Jones. I think local study is a very interesting lesson.

Susan Phibbs (Aged) 11 years

Extract ID: 5702

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Extract Author: Susan Phibbs (Aged) 11 years
Page Number: 25
Extract Date: March 1957

Local Study by Std. IV

Local Study is done in the thrid term of the year and only by Standards IV and Iva. Before we went out for local study we were divided into four groups with about six people to each group and we usually go out on a Thursday morning. The first time I went on a local study was September 26th, 1956, when we went on a Township Survey. Each group leader chose two people to study a road one on each side. We had to see what the name of the shop was and what it sold, and then had to write it down in our book. The next place we went to was Daresco which is owned by Mr. Bayer. Daresco supplies the electricity for the whole town.

The same day we went to Amekas Macaroni Industry, which is owned by Mr. Stylianou. We saw the macaroni going through different kinds of pipes and machines, and Mr. Stylianou gave us a box of macaroni.

The next week was very exciting because we went to Oljoro for the day in a lorry. We went to three farms and went to a cattle auction and we had a picnic by a river. Then we went to Mr. Boardman's house where we had tea and a fishing contest. The next week we went to the Police Headquarters where we met Mr. Clogger who talked about the Police, then we went up to the Boma and had our finger prints taken, and looked round the Boma. The next Thursday we went to the P.W.D. which stands for Public Works Department, and we were shown round by Mr. Patient.

The next time we went on local study we went to the Town Hall where Mr. Green, the town clerk, talked to us about government. The next week we went to the Town Hall again. Then the last week we had on local study we went to the Boma again and were shown round by Mr. Jones. I think local study is a very interesting lesson.

Extract ID: 3934

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 26-27
Extract Date: 1957

Films ~ When the World was Young ~ In Haveley Wood

FILMS

This year the school have been very fortunate for they have seen many films in the town. They have seen quite a good selection of films in the School too.

We have seen three films in the town, their names are "The Robe", "Rob Roy", and the "Living Desert". My favourite film was the Living Desert. It was a true life adventure about animals and their struggle for survival. My favourite film that I have seen at the School is "Winchester 73". It was a Wild West film all about a Winchester 73 and how it was said to be the best rifle in the West.

Other films that we have seen at School are "Belles on their toes", "Smoky" and "Treasure of the Golden Condor".

Melville Ueckermann 12 years

Extract ID: 5703

See also

Arusha School Magazine, 1957 March
Page Number: 28
Extract Date: 1957

The Sea at Tanga

Extract ID: 5704
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