Conservation and Mobile Indigenous Peoples: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development

Conservation and Mobile Indigenous Peoples: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development

Chatty, Dawn and Colchester, Marcus (Editors)

2002

Book ID 730

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Chatty, Dawn and Colchester, Marcus (Editors) Conservation and Mobile Indigenous Peoples: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development, 2002
Extract Author: Kathleen A. Galvin, Jim Ellis, Randall B. Boone, Ann L. Magennis, Nicole M. Smith, Stacy J. Lynn, Philip Thornton
Page Number: Chapter 3
Extract Date: 2002

Compatibility of Pastoralism and Conservation?

A Test Case using Integrated Assessment in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania

A major challenge for conservation agencies and advocates is formulating workable compromises between wildlife conservation and the people who live with wildlife. This is sometimes difficult because conflicts expand as human populations expand and because each different situation has its own peculiar dimensions. Various ecological, social, political and economic factors impinge on virtually all human-wildlife interactions, but the weight of each factor varies from one case to another. Thus, despite the attractive advantages of integrating conservation with human development, i.e., community-based conservation, many obstacles remain.

Extract ID: 4409

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Chatty, Dawn and Colchester, Marcus (Editors) Conservation and Mobile Indigenous Peoples: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development, 2002
Extract Author: J. Terrence McCabe
Page Number: Chapter 4
Extract Date: 2002

Giving Conservation a Human Face?

Lessons from Forty Years of Combining Conservation and Development in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania

As the human population of the earth grows there is an increased emphasis on the preservation of what remains of the planet's special places and important natural resources. The number of protected areas and national parks has increased dramatically over the past twenty years, especially in the developing world. New models of conservation have also been introduced, many that emphasize the incorporation of indigenous peoples into the conservation process. However, despite the importance of linking conservation and human development, for both the protection of natural resources and for the economies of indigenous peoples, there have been few examples of real success. One problem is that these Integrated Conservation and Development projects are relatively new, and that lessons learned from failure as well as success are just beginning to be understood. Another problem is that despite the rhetoric that advocates bringing indigenous peoples into the conservation process, often there seems to be little common ground or even communication between those who advocate for indigenous rights and human development and those who advocate for conservation of natural resources, especially wildlife. Of course there are exceptions, the attempts to bring the Aboriginal peoples into the management of National Parks in Australia being one example; the Campfire Programme in Zimbabwe (Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources) being another. However, recent books by Ghimire and Pimbert (1997), Stevens (1997), Neumann (1998) and Honey (1999) illustrate how difficult this task has been. Indeed other chapters in this volume will attest to the fact that the overall record has not been encouraging, especially with respect to protected areas.

16 pages, 1 table, 1 map

Extract ID: 4410

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See also

Chatty, Dawn and Colchester, Marcus (Editors) Conservation and Mobile Indigenous Peoples: Displacement, Forced Settlement and Sustainable Development, 2002
Extract Author: Jim Igoe
Page Number: Chapter 5
Extract Date: 2002

National Parks and Human Ecosystems:

The Challenge to Community Conservation. A Case Study from Simanjiro, Tanzania

Community conservation initiatives in Tanzania claim to give rural Tanzanians direct control of natural resources, thereby creating incentives for sustainable resource management at the community level. In practice, however, the agendas of international conservation organizations, private tour companies, and state elites dominate these programmes. The primary objective of Tanzanian community conservation is currently to enroll local people in the protection of national parks. Ironically, the institutional legacy of national parks plays a central role in the very problems that proponents of community conservation are trying to solve. As colonial institutions, national parks in East Africa were gazetted without regard for local resource management systems, or even the seasonal migration of resident wildlife. This chapter considers the ecological, economic, and social problems that national parks have caused throughout East Africa, taking into account structural adjustment programmes which facilitate the wholesale alienation of natural resources from local users.

20 pages, 6 figures

Extract ID: 4411
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