Tanganyika Guide

Tanganyika Guide

1953

Book ID 744

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 48
Extract Date: 1953

Dodoma Station

Extract ID: 5538

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 49
Extract Date: 1953

Section III—Dodoma to Tabora

Dodoma is situated near the watershed of the Indian Ocean and the Rift Valley. The great trough of the Rift, with its salt lakes and its large and small volcanoes, intersects the East African granite-plateau from latitude 6 deg. South, and then continues northwards through the Red Sea into the valley of the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, right to the foot of the Lebanon. The Central Railway cuts this rift near its southern end and, as the train crawls up the steep western scarp, a grand view unfolds itself, and like a gigantic map the valley lies below with the glittering surface of a great salt swamp in its southernmost corner. In the vicinity of Manyoni, on the top of the scarp, is the grave of the explorer James Elton, one of the first Englishmen to cross the interior. He died in 1877. Manyoni was the junction for the Singida railway line, which has how been taken up and replaced by a road from Itigi.

From near the upper edge of the scarp to Tabora and again for a long distance west of that town, the track passes through miles of wilderness into fine agricultural country. At kilometre 634 is a stone monument indicating the highest point of the line (4,350 ft.), and at kilometre 785 in flat country comes the Continental Divide, to the west of which water flows into Lake Tanganyika and thus, through the Congo, into the Atlantic.

At last there is a welcome change from thicket and wood into the open country surrounding Tabora, and soon the town itself, surrounded by granite hills and mango groves, is reached. It is the capital of the Nyamwezi country and, as the place where one of the largest and most industrious Bantu tribes is administered, continues the part it has for long played in East African history. Founded as an Arab colony for securing the long line of communication from the coast to the great lakes, the town is full of links with the past, and the tourist can see here the old " tembe " at Kwihara where Livingstone and Stanley lived together in 1872, the pass between two hills where they parted, or again the battle grounds where first Nyamwezi chiefs and Arabs, then Germans and Belgians have fought for the possession of this country. At Tabora is situated the leading Government school for Africans in the Territory.

As Tabora is at the junction of the Mwanza Line, it is on one of the through routes from Kenya and Uganda to the Congo and Northern Rhodesia ; it is also on one of the trunk air routes to South Africa, and travellers stop the night at the spacious German-built hotel which has recently been modernised.

Extract ID: 5539

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 50
Extract Date: 1953

Section IV—Tabora to Kigoma

West of Tabora the journey leads through densely populated and well-cultivated country for about 40 miles until, at Usoke, the savannah woodland is once more entered. From Kaliva, a little farther on, a branch railway has been built to the richly mineralised country containing the Mpanda Mine. Still farther on, the line dips into the deeply eroded Malagarasi Valley, and runs for some distance along the river, with the Uvinza Salt Works visible on the opposite side. The excellent salt produced at this place was well known when Burton, the explorer, passed by on his way to Lake Tanganyika in 1857, and Africans still come from places hundreds of miles away to purchase it. The salt also finds a good market far into the Eastern Congo.

Once more the line leaves the main valley and climbs to a plateau, finally descending into the Central African Rift. Then come a few low hills, a few groves of oil palms, and the train pulls up on the shore of Kigoma Bay, a sheet of dark blue water, surrounded on three sides by pleasant hills, while through the fourth shines the surface of mighty Lake Tanganyika.

Although the development of Kigoma was severely checked by the war, the port now has a considerable trade from the shores of the lake, from the Belgian Congo and from Ruanda-Urundi. From Kigoma the traveller should not fail to visit the old Arab port of Ujiji, three miles across the hills on the open shores of the lake, where a monument marks the site of the old mango tree under which Stanley met Livingstone in 1871. There are many pleasant walks along the hilltops of Kigoma Peninsula, with splendid views of the lake and the distant Congo Mountains.

Extract ID: 5540

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 51
Extract Date: 1953

Section V—Tabora to Mwanza

The construction of the line from Tabora to Mwanza was commenced in April, 1925, and the line was finally opened to traffic in August, 1928. From Tabora it traverses the cleared farm lands of the district for about ten miles, which is followed by an area of " Miombo " forest which extends for another forty. From Bukene, mile 56, to Mwanza, mile 237, a wonderful stretch of open undulating cattle country is traversed—a land which not only raises cattle, but which is capable of producing groundnuts, cotton and other export commodities, as well as food crops.

Mwanza itself is a picturesque, wooded town situated on the shores of Lake Victoria. From the top of Fort Hill a fine view of the lake and town is obtainable. There is a charming nine-hole golf course set amid rocky hills near the lake shore, and the Gymkhana Club maintains three tennis courts. Bathing is to be had at Bwiru. About four miles from the town, near the Government and Native Administration schools.

The circular walk round Capri Point Forest Reserve (about three miles) is recommended, while, for those who prefer motoring, a pleasant drive can be had along the thirty-mile avenue forming the Mwanza end of the Tabora Road, one of the main highways of the Territory.

There are two hotels in the town.

Extract ID: 5541

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 63
Extract Date: 1953

Great North Road

The road leaves Arusha township in a direction due west for the first nine miles, thereafter bending southwards in a great curve to the west, until it passes the eastern shores of Lake Manyara, 65 miles from Arusha. Thence the road follows a line due south through Babati and on to Pienaar's Heights, the whole route being beaconed on each side with magnificent isolated peaks. Over many miles game of every description may be seen, and, owing to the restrictions on shooting, giraffe, zebra, wildebeest, gazelle and lion sometimes are to be met with on the road itself. South of Babati, 116 miles from Arusha, much native cultivation is passed, and from here on to Bereku the country is reminiscent of England, the road taking a winding course up the hills through magnificent trees between whose branches impressive panoramas are seen of the Babati area, Hanang Mountain and the Great Rift wall to the north, while to the south and east stretch to the horizon the plains of the Central Province and the Masai steppe.

The road still bears south, and Kondoa is reached at mile 170 from Arusha. From here it proceeds through the Gogo country to Dodoma on the Central Railway, 272 miles from Arusha. Dodoma is an important centre of the Territory's communications. It has a hotel and a first-class aerodrome, with metalled runway, within a mile of the town.

Extract ID: 5542

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 65
Extract Date: 1953

III. The Mwanza—Tabora Road Mwanza—Shinyanga—Tinde—Tabora, 227 miles

From Mwanza this road runs through heavily cultivated country along a beautiful avenue of Cassia simea trees for 31 miles, rice, cotton, groundnuts and millet fields being met with en route. Shinyanga, headquarters of a district and a railway station, is reached at mile 102 from Mwanza. Old Shinyanga, a few miles away, is the headquarters of the Tsetse Research Department and a visit is recommended. At Mwadui, 18 miles away, is the now famous Williamson Diamond Mine.

From Shinyanga the road runs to Tinde, where the main road to Bukoba and Uganda is met. The Manyonga river is crossed at about mile 130, and the road then proceeds through open cattle country to Nzega, 75 miles from Tabora. Tabora is a town of considerable importance, and contains hotels and two banks. From Nzega a branch road leads to Sekenke and Singida ; the former place was formerly the centre of important gold-mining activities.

Extract ID: 5635

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 70a

Mount Meru and the Crater

Extract ID: 5637

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 70b

Lake Duluti, Arusha, with, behind, Mount Meru

Extract ID: 5638

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1953
Page Number: 71

Engaruka

At Engaruka there are stone ruins of a great village where the inhabitants were perhaps once concentrated for defence against the Masai. On a frontage of about three miles tier upon tier of terracing is still clearly visible and closer inspection shows the rock-built homes, the graves and the huge cairns of a vanished people. From Engaruka Masai bomas may also be visited without difficulty.

Extract ID: 5636
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