Personal communication

Colwell, Christine

2004

Book ID 811

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Extract Author: Christine Colwell
Page Number: 2004 08 26
Extract Date: 2004 08 26

My aunt Antonina nee Bujalska

Have read through a number of very interesting articles related to Tengeru. However, wish to say that my aunt Antonina nee Bujalska was in Tengeru. She, her sister, cousins and mother were all there for a number of years from 1942 on. My "Ciocia Tosia" died last year in September at the age of 90 and left me photos of her years in Africa. Should you be interested in these I would be very pleased to "zap" you some on the e-mail.

One aspect does puzzle me - who established the camp in Tengeru and who was in charge of daily administration and financing"

I appear to be learning a great deal more from the internet sites rather than from the tales my aunt provided - I was always so careful not to upset her or ask an inappropriate question.

Extract ID: 4730

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Extract Author: David Marsh
Page Number: 2004 08 27
Extract Date: 2004 08 27

Reply

Many thanks for your interesting family information about Tengeru. I shall add it to the database ready for the next update.

And do please send whatever photos you think will be of interest to other people about Tengeru. Let me know exactly who should be credited.

As for who funded the camp:

Here's part of what I found at

http://feefhs.org/pl/orphan/orphant.html

In the summer of 1941 the Polish government in exile in London received permission from the Soviet Union to release several hundred thousand former Polish citizens from labor camps, prisons and forcible resettlement in the Soviet Union, to organize military units among the Polish deportees, and later to transfer Polish civilians to camps in the British-controlled Middle East and Africa. There the Polish children were able to attend Polish schools.

In 1942, the London government, acting through their Consul General Dr. Mi. Stanislaw Lepkowski, secured permission from the government of the Union of South Africa to transport 500 of the estimated 220-250,000 children to that country. In 1943, after they had been evacuated through the southern Soviet republics to Iran, the children were brought to South Africa.

The Polish Children's Home (Dom Polskich Dzieci) was organized in Oudtshoorn for their temporary accommodation, care and education. Under the supervision of the South African Department of Social Welfare, as well as Polish consular and ministry representatives, it remained in operation until 1947.

[snip]

Also in October of 1944, arrangements were made with the East African Refugee Administration to transfer another small group of nine children to Polish camps in Bwana Mkubwa, Abercorn and Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia to rejoin their families. The transfer took place early in 1945.

Some time in 1944 another, large, transfer was made of 115 children to camps in Kenya. The lists document the entry into Kenya of 43 children to Camps in Tengeru, 43 to Masindi, 21 to Koja, 5 to Ifunda, 1 to Morongo or Rongai and 2 to Kidugala.

I'm sure you can find more in the General Langfitt story

http://www.immi.gov.au/research/publications/langfitt/index.htm

Itís not clear to me whether the funding was from the Polish Government in Exile, or ultimately from UK, or even US.

Equally, at Tengeru, Iíve no idea how much autonomy the Polish people had in the finance and running of the camp, or how much was supported by the British administration locally, or the Colonial Office (or the War Department) in London.

Do let me know of anything you are able to find out.

Itís sad that there are always questions we wish we had asked of our parents, aunts and uncles, before it was too late. And Iím sure there are many memories now lost about such fascinating bits of our history, such as the Tengeru camp.

From my youth, I remembered Tengeru as being to the north of the road between Arusha and Moshi, and have retraveled that road many times in the last few years without seeing any sign of Tengeru. It was only on my last trip that we suddenly realised that the road had been rebuilt and now follows a course north of Tengeru. So next time I visit I shall know to look South for the location of the camp.

Extract ID: 4731

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Extract Author: Christine Colwell
Page Number: 2004 08 28a
Extract Date: 2004 08 28

Photos

Thanks for your prompt reply and information. I'm certain you quite likely have sufficient "snapshots" of Tengeru. However, given the very small photos - black and white which I'm forwarding - quality is definitely dubious. The attached are the only ones that I would consider directly related to the camp. I have others which are wonderful photos of the Masai and Mount Meru, glaciers and elephant hunts - which I can photocopy on a laser printer or duplicate in a higher quality and send to you rather than cramming up the e-mail network. In terms of accreditation - heaven knows whose Brownie Box Camera snapped them up almost 60 years ago! There are a number of photos from Karachi - would anyone be interested?

I have no idea where I got the notion that you were in Australia - General Langfitt no doubt. We live in Victoria, on Vancouver Island in British Columbia Canada. Should you want the other related photos, please provide your mailing address and I'll be happy to send them "snail mail".

Extract ID: 4732

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Page Number: 2004 08 28b
Extract Date: 1940's


Family photo from Christine Colwell

Extract ID: 4733

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Page Number: 2004 08 28c
Extract Date: 1940's


Family photo from Christine Colwell

Extract ID: 4734

See also

Colwell, Christine Personal communication, 2004
Page Number: 2004 08 28d
Extract Date: 1940's


Family photo from Christine Colwell

Extract ID: 4735
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