Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro

Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer

2007

Reviews

Reviews

"Helmut Glenk, together with Horst Blaich and Peer Gatter are to be congratulated on their meticulous research on the migration of Templer families from Palestine to German East Africa at the beginning of the 20th century. Their research has culminated in this substantial historical book.

I admire the authors' capability for finding so many interesting personal accounts of the settlers who ventured to Arusha, Mt Meru and Tanga. The numerous photographs and illustrations interspersed throughout the text enhance the value of the book."

Peter Lange

President, Temple Society, Stuttgart, Germany

"In Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro the authors expose an unknown chapter in the history of the German Templer settlers in Palestine. Created between 1868 and1948, this tiny group's unique phenomenon in the Holy Land, was actually the leading factor in the modernisation process. Their story became familiar to many; their heritage on the Israeli landscape is still remarkable and well preserved to this day. Yet, only few knew about the experimental adventure of some families, who migrated to German East Africa, in order to seek a new future.

The book leads the reader through the saga of the settlers, the debates among the community members regarding the impact of such an emigration on their mission in Palestine, the hard work in the shadow of Mt Meru and Mt Kilimanjaro, and the fate of the families during the World Wars which were the main factor to the ending of this fascinating story. The book is an excellent example of historical research, based on archival sources, personal evidences and illustrations which open to the reader a window to a forgotten piece of history."

Professor Dr. Yossi Ben-Artzi

Rector, University of Haifa, Israel

"Helmut Glenk spreads out before us the story of an unknown pioneering exploit of the second and third generation of the German settlers from Palestine, who had linked their fate with the awakening continent and who had established an agricultural settlement in East Africa.

Glenk, a descendant of the first settlers in Palestine, tells the story of settlement in Africa in his flowing style, enlightening the reader with another fascinating episode in the history of the Templers, as he had done in his previous book about Sarona - the settlement of his forefathers."

Dr. Yaron Perry

Haifa University, Israel

"The book Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro is of great significance. Helmut Glenk, Horst Blaich and Peer Gatter document the commencement of colonisation of German East Africa; the first contacts by the Templers with that continent and their interest in East Africa onwards from 1896. The book is in chronological order, meticulously written, detailing the hardships and difficulties the settlers encountered when they migrated to Africa.

We are indebted to Helmut Glenk, Horst Blaich and Peer Gatter for this book which provides the readers with an important contribution to the history of the Temple Society."

Dr Jakob Eisler

Historian Landeskirchliches Archiv Stuttgart und Hochschule Ludwigsburg bei Stuttgart, Germany

Book ID 976

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 079
Extract Date: 1910

Gottlieb Immanuel Bauer

Gottlieb Immanuel Bauer (1881-1927) was the son of Gottlieb Bauer of Höfen near Winnenden (Germany), who had served as a missionary in Nubia in the 1860s and had come to Palestine in 1869 and settled in Bethlehem as a shoemaker. After the early death of his father, Gottlieb Immanuel was raised in the Syrian Orphanage in Jerusalem. At age 16 his step-father and guardian, G. Strecker, enabled him to return to his father’s native Württemberg to serve an apprenticeship as a mechanic in Stuttgart-Feuerbach. After its completion he returned to Palestine in 1902 and took up employment as master mechanic in the Wagner Bros Foundry and Engineering works, and as trained well-driller, constructed numerous wells in the coastal plain between Gaza , Sarona and Ramleh. His ability to locate underground water sources with the dowsing rod was a gift that in later years in East Africa would prove quite beneficial.

In 1906 he married Pauline Elise Blanckertz (born 1886) - daughter of the affluent Jaffa beer brewer Johann Albert Blanckertz.

In 1910 the family left Palestine and settled in Leganga in German East Africa.

Extract ID: 5622

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 085
Extract Date: 1910

Leganga

The 1200 hectare property was located on the Maji-Tschai River that earned its name from the swampy brown tea-coloured water it carried. Gottlieb Bauer dug a small channel from this waterway to bring water to the house and farm, however as there was some doubt about the water quality being suitable for human consumption, a well was dug close to the farmhouse. Whilst digging his well Bauer hit bedrock and was unable to reach any water. In the following weeks he prospected his land with pick and dowsing rod in order to find underground water sources and dug at several sites. He soon came to realize that under most of his property there was a massive layer of rock in depths of 1-3 meters that could neither be dug nor drilled though. His hopes to plant coffee here were thus shattered, as coffee plants require deep soil to grow due their long taproots.

Extract ID: 5618

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 088
Extract Date: 1911

The Bauer Mill in Arusha

Extract ID: 5610

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 090
Extract Date: 1911

Gottlieb Bauer prospected the terrain

During the dry season of 1911, Gottlieb Bauer prospected the terrain around the town of Arusha for a better spot to establish his family. He had soon found suitable land in the beautiful forest area on the Temi River in the Wa-Arusha tribal territory. The land was in sight of Arusha located between the villages of the chiefs Angarashi, Toronge, and Mekogi. The river had year round water and enough flow to power a mill. The Bauers bought a further 400 hectares of land there intending to farm coffee and vegetables, but Gottlieb’s main focus was to built a grain- and sawmill as well as an oil-press. During 1911 Elise, his wife, and his mother, Friedericke, remained with the children in Leganga (where in December 1911 Rudolf was born), and continued with the vegetable and grain farming, while Gottlieb built a permanent house on the Temi River with several large sheds for all his tools and equipment, a lathe and workbench as well as a blacksmith workshop.

Extract ID: 5619

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 090
Extract Date: 1911

Mill canal

Extract ID: 5611

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 099
Extract Date: 1912

The Bauers left Leganga

In early 1912 the Bauers left Leganga and resettled in their new house on the Temi River. From Rudolf Bauer’s memoires a good description is available of a typical settler family home and its surroundings: “It had a solid foundation and was built up to the raised ground floor with cement and then with bricks, which my father had manufactured with the help of native employees. In a mud pit the clay was pounded with the feet and then filled into wooden moulds and dried in the sun. In this way two large rooms emerged. In the front was the living- and dining room, and behind it the parents’ bedroom. A wide staircase led upstairs. To the right of these stairs was the bedroom for us children. The left side served as a provision room. There non-perishable food stuffs were stored, such a 2 sacks of raw coffee, one or two sacks of rice, as well as a large sugarloaf. The roof of the house was covered with corrugated iron. In front of the residence was a porch […] Behind the building a beautiful flower garden had been created of which our gardener Lempoto was in charge[…]The living quarters and the kitchen building were about 20 meters from the mill-stream. On the right hand side a path lined by lemon trees led to the brick oven. To the left of the garden was an alley of cypress trees. Opposite of the residential building was a big poultry yard, in the middle of which was a large pond for geese and ducks. Many chicken, guinea fowls, and turkeys were kept in the chicken shed, which was raised very high off the ground to provide safety from predators. Next to it was also a pigsty.”

Extract ID: 5620

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 104
Extract Date: 1911

Mill Wheel

Extract ID: 5613

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 105
Extract Date: 1911

Mill wheel

Extract ID: 5612

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro, 2007
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 105
Extract Date: 1912

The mill was a successful venture

After the house, workshop and mill buildings had been completed Bauer constructed the mill fittings, including the mill wheel, and dug a five meter wide canal that was fed by three small springs surfacing in the river bed of the Temi. The canal with its length of some 400 meters was partly lined with concrete and led the water to the mill wheel. Over 100 native workers were employed to dig out the canal as well as a small weir for additional water storage.

The workshop and mill erected by the Bauers were the first in the Arusha region and were soon to become a well known stopping point for migrating Boer families from South Africa who arrived with their oxen and wagons before settling in German East Africa. The mill was a successful venture and many nearby farmers brought their grains to be ground there. Each morning also native ladies carrying bowls of cereals on their heads would arrive from the surrounding villages to grind their produce.

Extract ID: 5621
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