Arusha: Christ Church

Name ID 23

See also

Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro
Extract Date: 1896~

Diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa

Originally there was a vast Diocese of Eastern Equatorial Africa, established during the time of ‘the scramble for Africa’. Later, it was divided up, and this area became part of the Diocese of Mombasa.

Extract ID: 63

See also

Christ Church News
Extract Date: 1925

A church committee

Church records show that in 1925, some 7 years before the consecration of the church, there was a church committee of lay members only - no chaplain.

Extract ID: 64

See also

Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro
Extract Date: 1927

Diocese of Central Tanganyika

formation of Diocese of Central Tanganyika. ...

Extract ID: 65

See also

Christ Church News
Extract Date: 1927

Church Missionary Society of Australia

and responsibility for it was taken over by the Church Missionary Society of Australia

Extract ID: 66

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1928-32

Dunham, J,C.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4594

See also

Christ Church News
Extract Date: 1929

Plans for a temporary church building

In 1929 plans for a temporary church building were proposed, but it was decided 'to suspend building operations until the railway reaches Arusha'.

Extract ID: 67

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 18

b. THE VISION OF BISHOP CHAMBERS:

The Church Missionary Society from U.K. was one of the first missionary bodies in East Africa and it was Krapf and Rebman from its ranks who first sighted Kilimanjaro in 1859. Based on Mombasa, they established before 1900 a chain of mission stations in Kenya and inland Tanganyika while the Universities Mission to Central Africa undertook Anglican missionary work along the Tanganyika coast and on Zanzibar. In 1927, the Diocese of Central Tanganyika was carved out of the Mombasa Diocese as an independent entity.

The Church Missionary Society of Australia was given responsibility for this new sprawling Diocese. George William Chambers was consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury and appointed to take over existing C.M.S. work in the area and spearhead a new Anglican initiative for mission work in what was actually the whole of Tanganyika away from the coast and southern highlands.

En route from Australia to his consecration, Chambers toured his new Diocese and was impressed by the complete lack of pastoral or chaplaincy provision for the Europeans and the inadequacy of education for their children. His biographer quotes him saying in 1928

“… there was a feeling abroad that the church cared only for the African. One European who had. lost his wife was forced to lock up his young daughter in the house all day while he went to work. Another said, ‘You look after the Africans but don't care a jot for us Europeans’”.

The Bishop was in fact most anxious to provide for European children, and when he was in Moshi, he conferred with the Director of Education. It was decided to recommend. to the Government that a school for European children be established at a cost of £15,000 of which the Diocese would be obliged to find half.

In fulfilment of this need, Chambers did three things. Firstly he raised funds in. U.K. for church buildings for the Europeans at Morogoro, Tabora, Kigoma, Bukoba, Arusha, Moshi and Mwanza. He also began to recruit chaplains from the U.K. for these churches. Thirdly he recruited from Australia a young couple, Mr. and Mrs. I. Boothe, who came to Tanganyika with him in 1928 to establish the first boarding school for Europeans.

Extract ID: 4925

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Helen Grazier (nee Goode)
Page Number: 2004 06 11
Extract Date: 1950's

Helen Goode - Arusha School - 1950's

I’ve just come across your site with so much interesting information on Arusha School. I was a former pupil there in the mid 1950’s, but my paternal Grandmother Gertrude Goode was matron at the school for 8 years in the 1930/40’s. I have a few photos of that era if you are interested.

My Grandfather Robert (Bob) Goode was an architect/builder who is responsible for a number of churches & buildings including the Arusha clock tower.

Congratulations on producing such a wonderful site which holds so many memories for so many people.

Regards,

Helen Grazier (nee Goode)

Helen

Forgive me, I failed to reply to your email when it arrived - I was in fact away, visiting Arusha - and I must have missed it completely. Now I’m trying to catch up on my nTZ web site stuff, before another trip back to Arusha.

I’m most interested in your information about your Grandfather who designed the Clock Tower. I’ve been trying for ages to find out when it was built, and why, and who paid for it, and, of course who designed it.

SO far I gather it was just after WW2, and donated by a "Greek".

Do you have any more information you could share with me, and the web site about the Clock Tower specifically, but also would be fascinated to hear more about other buildings your Grandfather designed.

What were your parents doing, that you were at Arusha School in the 50’s - and where are you now?

I also was at the school at the same time 53-57 (my father was rector at Christ Church), but I’m sorry that I don’t remember your name - I’m not sure that I could remember many names.

I have two Arusha School Magazines Feb 56, and March 57, and I see no mention of any Goodes - the names listed are either magazine contributors or prize winners of various types. I did see an poem in memory of "Cloudy" - Sister Gertrude Cloudsdale, Senior Matron 1945-49. Maybe all matrons were called Gertrude!

Thanks for your email, and again forgive me for taking too long to reply

It was a pleasant surprise to hear from you, as I must admit I thought maybe my email had gone into a "black hole". Unfortunately, I haven't too many details about my Grandfather and there's no-one alive for me to call on for help. What I do have are a magazine article in 1960 written about my grandparents on their golden wedding anniversary, and the script of a speech my grandmother gave in 1969.

In the magazine (Looking Glass) it describes their life when they moved to Moshi in 1929 from Eldoret & prior to 1923 they were in India. Gertrude Goode became the town baker in Moshi, and

"in these pre-war years Mr Goode, as architect or builder and contractor was responsible for such well-known buildings as the Dodoma Cathedral, the Arusha Church and the old Coffee Tree Inn (which became the New Ridgeway Hotel)."

"When the Arusha School first opened in 1937, Mrs Goode was asked to give a hand for two or three days. Those few days lasted 8 years, where as matron of the school she was responsible for the well-being of the children."

The photos I have are of the staff, dining room and pupils and are dated 1939.

In my grandmother's speech she says:

"My husband, a military Engineer was filling in a great want, designing, building etc. The Australian Church Missionary Society had their headquarters in Dodoma about 2 days by train away. The Bishop asked my husband to design a cathedral in 6 days! To cut a long story short, he did it, staying up late at night. I washed the blue prints in the bathroom outside and finished the morning the train was leaving, and helped to carry the copy out full to dry! Dodoma cathedral is beautiful, a smaller copy was built in Arusha."

"My husband built the first Church of Scotland Church in Moshi, which was part of the Minister's house, as Moshi was so poor that the Minister had to give up his dining and drawing room to serve as a church. The furniture was made by young Africans taught by my husband. A new church and vicarage was built some 11 or more years later, and the first one now serves as a hall for visiting missionaries."

It seems that my grandfather did most of his work during the 1930's (he was born in 1881), so I think it would have been around the same time that he did the Arusha Clock Tower. I know he also designed and built the Chapel of St John the Divine in Moshi as my parents were married there in 1945.

My father David Goode was 18 yrs old when the family moved from India. He had a variety of jobs including a Beacon Inspector in the Lupa Goldfields, but after WW2 he joined the Agricultural Department where he remained until we left for England in 1960 (my mother came from UK). Both my brother Michael and I were born in Bukoba, but the family moved every 3 years or so due to my father's job. Michael and I went to Mbeya, Arusha and St Michael's & St George's in Iringa.

I emigrated to Perth, Western Australia in 1970 and my parents (who have both since died) followed me in 1983. My brother remains in UK.

My memory for names is atrocious, and trying to remember those from so many years ago is almost impossible for me. The only claim to fame I have from Arusha is that I won a scholarship to attend Iringa and I was considered a promising violinist!!

I'm sorry I can't be more specific about the Clock Tower. I visited Arusha while on a camping holiday in 1989 and was thrilled to see that it still holds pride of place in the town.

Regards,

Helen

Extract ID: 4831

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 01
Extract Date: July 19 1931

Dedication in the Chancel

This Chancel was erected be relatives and friends in loving memory of A. Graham de Courcy-Ireland B.A. Assistant District Administrator who was accidently killed at Babati on July 19 1931

Extract ID: 4617

See also

Marsh, R.J. Diary
Extract Date: 1953

Arusha residents

Arusha, a growing town and headquarters of the province, is the centre of my work in this part of Northern Tanganyika. Christ Church was built in 1932, and a fairly continuous Chaplaincy work has been carried out in the district. But behind this continuity there has been, and still is, a great deal of change.

At the end of the war there may have been no more than 30 residential dwellings in the town; now there are over 130 with an increasing number of flat dwellings in the commercial area. Many residents are Government Officials, who are not likely to be in the district much longer than two years, and their numbers are always changing. ...

Although the town plays a prominent part in the work, there are other places to be considered. Farming estates within distances of up to twenty or thirty miles from town; smaller Government stations with a population of perhaps 12 families, such as Monduli 25 miles away, or Mbulu 140 miles away. There is also a large farming community at Oldeani some 100 miles away.

Extract ID: 56

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1932-34

Kidner, H.S.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4595

See also

Christ Church News
Extract Author: R.J.Marsh
Extract Date: 1957

Twenty-Five Years and More

Which comes first Church, Chaplain, or People?

Well, In Arusha, the answer is People, for church records show that as early as 1925, some 7 years before the consecration of the church, there was a church committee of lay members only with no Chaplain. The chaplain, the Rev. J. C. Dunham, was not to arrive until some time in 1928, and the completion of the first part of the church was not accomplished until September, 1932.

A tremendous amount was owed in those early days, and still is owed, to the generous giving of Miss Violet Drysdale, a friend of Arusha in England, who provided much of the money for the building of the church and the provision of some of its furniture.

Early reminiscences.

In 1929 plans for a temporary church building were proposed, but it was decided 'to suspend building operations until the Railway reaches Arusha'. (Church Council Minute). The Rev. J. S. Dunham continued as the first chaplain In the Northern Province until after the building of Christ Church In 1932. He was succeeded by the Rev. H. S. Kidner, and then later by the Rev. Wynne Jones, headmaster of the newly formed Arusha School, who was eventually to become a much loved Bishop of Central Tanganyika

In 1935 the Rev. W. A. Cross was inducted to the 'Kilimanjaro Chaplaincy' by Archdeacon Briggs, and served in the Northern Province for four years. Among the many popular (!) items for debate by the Church Council in those years was the problem of the church roof. Present day members need little reminding that we still have the roof (and its problems) with us!

Tell us what you know.

We hope that in the coming months it will be possible to relate more of the events that have taken place in these first twenty five years of Christ Church. However, our church records are not always complete, and we are sure there are many interesting matters left out. If you have any reminiscences of earlier days connected with Christ Church, Arusha, please write to us about them, and if possible they will be published. Any information should be sent to the Editor, Christ Church News, P.O. Box 263, Arusha.

Extract ID: 70

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1934-35

Wynnn-Jones, W.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4596

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1935-39

Cross, W.A.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4597

See also

Cross, W.A. Notes on the chaplaincy in the Northern province (of Tanganyika)


typescript RH ref MSS. Afr. s. 1476

Extract ID: 1184

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1939-41

Cooper, C.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4598

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 03
Extract Date: 20 March 1940

Left Window - St. Mary

To the glory of God and in memory of Kenyon Vickers Painter, who died 20th March 1940

Extract ID: 4619

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1941-46

No Chaplain

Extract ID: 4599

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1946-50

Cordell, O.T.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4600

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1950-53

McKnight, T.F.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4601

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 01


Extract ID: 3983

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1953-57

Marsh, R.J.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4602

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 02


Extract ID: 3982

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 04


Extract ID: 3980

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 06


Extract ID: 3981

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 07


Extract ID: 3984

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 08


Extract ID: 3985

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 09


Extract ID: 3986

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 10


Extract ID: 4055

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 03
Extract Date: July 1954


Extract ID: 3979

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1957-61

Thomson, H.E.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4603

See also

Christ Church News
Extract Author: R.J.Marsh
Extract Date: 1957

Twenty-Five Years and More

Which comes first Church, Chaplain, or People?

Well, In Arusha, the answer is People, for church records show that as early as 1925, some 7 years before the consecration of the church, there was a church committee of lay members only with no Chaplain. The chaplain, the Rev. J. C. Dunham, was not to arrive until some time in 1928, and the completion of the first part of the church was not accomplished until September, 1932.

A tremendous amount was owed in those early days, and still is owed, to the generous giving of Miss Violet Drysdale, a friend of Arusha in England, who provided much of the money for the building of the church and the provision of some of its furniture.

Early reminiscences.

In 1929 plans for a temporary church building were proposed, but it was decided 'to suspend building operations until the Railway reaches Arusha'. (Church Council Minute). The Rev. J. S. Dunham continued as the first chaplain In the Northern Province until after the building of Christ Church In 1932. He was succeeded by the Rev. H. S. Kidner, and then later by the Rev. Wynne Jones, headmaster of the newly formed Arusha School, who was eventually to become a much loved Bishop of Central Tanganyika

In 1935 the Rev. W. A. Cross was inducted to the 'Kilimanjaro Chaplaincy' by Archdeacon Briggs, and served in the Northern Province for four years. Among the many popular (!) items for debate by the Church Council in those years was the problem of the church roof. Present day members need little reminding that we still have the roof (and its problems) with us!

Tell us what you know.

We hope that in the coming months it will be possible to relate more of the events that have taken place in these first twenty five years of Christ Church. However, our church records are not always complete, and we are sure there are many interesting matters left out. If you have any reminiscences of earlier days connected with Christ Church, Arusha, please write to us about them, and if possible they will be published. Any information should be sent to the Editor, Christ Church News, P.O. Box 263, Arusha.

Extract ID: 70

See also

Marsh, R.J. & E.P. Photos of Christ Church, Arusha
Page Number: 05


Extract ID: 3978

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 38

e. AN ENRICHING SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT:

While Hamshere found day pupils an annoying appendage to the school, it must be said to his credit that he provided for the boarders a rich and stimulating environment. It is worth listing here briefly the significant extra-curricular activities which feature in the school records.

In the very first years of the school, Wynn Jones organised students to level the playing fields and as soil was removed to top-dress them, a 15 metre swimming pool was dug. Swimming; became an important sport and recreational activity, and both a swimming gala and swimming sports day involving former pupils were held annually.

An important annual event in which Hamshere himself always took the lead was the climb of Mt. Meru (14,979') near Arusha. Some 12 to 20 trained and physically fit children made the climb and an attractive certificate was presented to those who “conquered”.

A school sports day was held each year, usually in the presence of some distinguished quest such as the Governor and Lady Twining in 1955.There was also an inter school sports day against the Greek and Dutch schools, but no competitive sports with African schools.

Carols by Candlelight, begun by the music mistress in 1947,,became a significant even for Arusha town.

A Christmas play preceded the annual Speech Day at which the Warden or his deputy presented the prizes.

A proliferation of cups and shields, was accumulated from old students members of the School Council. These included

the Wynn Jones memorial scripture prizes,

the Rasharasha prizes for “dependability, helpfulness and behaviour”,

the Ann Revington Cup for the best all round girl and

the Du Toit cup for the best all round boy;

there was a Selian cup for physical culture,

an Ann Hazel Cup for swimming.

House Shields for swimming and athletics carved by a blind African wood carver and house trophies for rounders, hockey diving, football, rugby, netball and cricket.

There were inter school visits and sports matches with Nairobi School and Mombasa Primary School.

An annual school magazine was published from 1955 to 1965, and

there were troops of Guides, Brownies and Scouts.

From fund raising within the school, horses were purchased in 1954 and 2 tennis courts built in 1958.

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the founding of the school in 1959, a bronze plaque noting the association of the school with the Diocese was unveiled in Christ Church Arusha, a special thanksgiving service was held, and £2,000 was collected for a Silver Jubilee Library. Bishop Chambers, whose foresight in 1927 had set plans in motion for the school, came at the age of 83 to open the library.

In 1943 the school was the venue for a conference of translators of the Bible into Swahili;

in 1947 delegates to the Pan African pre-history congress were accommodated in the school;

in 1950 Lady Baden Powell the Chief Guide, and later that year Lord Rowallen, the Chief Scout, visited the school;

in 1956 Princess Margaret spent 15 minutes with. the pupils in the school hall while the Hellenic and Dutch schools were allowed to line the drive! A cupboard full of Union Jacks, kept firmly locked in these post Independence days, remains as memento of the occasion.

In 1961 a conference on the preservation of wild life was held at the school and included such distinguished guests as Sir Julian Huxley, Peter Scott, Professor Monet, Armand and Michaela Dennis and Dr. Grzimek.

In 1969 the Presidents of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania met in the school to establish the East African Community.

In spite of the rapid turnover of teachers, matrons and some pupils, a strong school spirit and tradition was established. This was contributed to materially by the continuity of the School Council and of senior staff members as exemplified by

the Headmaster 1946 - 1964,

Miss I. Brown, Senior Mistress 1949 - 61,

Mrs. Fischer, Senior Matron 1950 - 59,

Mr. R. Johnson 1952 - 59,

Mr. H. Jones, Second Master 1953 - 61,

Rev. B. Jones Chaplain and from 1963 Headmaster, 1954 - 69, and

Mr. J. Hazel 1956 - 63.

Such continuity, even if for only a small proportion of the staff, was most unusual for the Colonial Service. The Department of Education, the statistics for which are not reflected in the above staff sample, could say in 1957, “there is a high rate of turnover of staff and delays in recruitment and by the end of the year, there was not one mistress who had been them 3 years previously”

Extract ID: 4942

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 04
Extract Date: 1961

Right Window - St. George

Presented by the Royal Society of St. George, 1961

Extract ID: 4620

external link

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: Sheila Speed
Page Number: 233
Extract Date: 17 Aug 2002

William Angus Speed

Dear Editor,

My Name is Sheila Speed. From 1948 to 1961 my Grand Father (William Angus Speed) worked in the colonial civil service - initially in the Enemy Property section and later in the Lands and Survey department in Tanga, Tanganyika.

He was much respected and admired for his honesty and integrity. When he died in 1961 the European Community raised funds for memorial gates at the Anglican Church in Arusha post his death. No one in my family has returned to Arusha since 1961 and my Father, also named William Angus Speed, has asked me if I could visit Arusha when I come to Africa for my next business trip in the near future.

I am looking for information of a contact person, preferably from the Anglican Church where the memorial gates are. Can you please help me?

In sincere appreciation for your assistance.

Sheila Speed

Extract ID: 3556

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1962-63

Hewetson, D.M.

Chaplain of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4604

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1963-64

Arblaster, E.H.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4605

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 02
Extract Date: 1964

Far Left Window - St, Michael

In loving memory of Gladys Rydon, 1964.

Donated by her son Arthur

Extract ID: 4618

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1964-67

Corbett, M.T.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4606

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1968-72

Taylor, R.J.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4607

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 05
Extract Date: 2 July 1968

Far Right Window - St. Patrick

In memory of Patrick Mahon, Born 28 May 1945, Died 2 July 1968 (buried below)

Extract ID: 4621

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1972-76

Chittleborough, G.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4608

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1976-78

Tims, C.P.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4609

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1978-84

Stott, C.J.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4610

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1982-87

Kusenha, A.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4611

See also

Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro
Extract Date: 1982 June 20

Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro

Inauguration of Diocese of Mount Kilimanjaro

Extract ID: 71

See also

Stott, Chris Personal communication
Extract Author: Chris Stott
Extract Date: 1994

Christ Church is predominantly Swahili speaking

The church, Christ Church was becoming predominantly a Swahili speaking church when Chris and Eva left. The ex-pats now form the Arusha Community Church, which meets in a Greek Church, I think he said. Of people he knew who might be still there, he recalled Alan and Anne Renshaw of the Elim Pentecostal Church, living north of Arusha (Burka estate?).

Extract ID: 1321

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1983

Mayala, B.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4612

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1987-89

Ndahani, N.D.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4613

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1989-92

Kawala, P.J.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4614

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1992

Kilevo, M.E.

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4615

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Extract Date: 1994

A.W.Kajembe

Vicar of Christ Church Arusha

Extract ID: 4616

See also

Christ Church Arusha
Page Number: 06

Cannon Shells

Interesting to see that there are two cannon shells used as flower vases.

Extract ID: 4629

external link

See also

Internet Web Pages
Extract Author: The Very Revd Jerry Kramer
Extract Date: 15 April 04

A Letter from Africa

4-17-04 - A Letter from Africa

(Lifted directly from Kendall's blog http://titusonenine.classicalanglican.net/index.php?p=922)

April 15, 2004

The Most Rev. Frank T. Griswold

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

815 Second Avenue

New York, NY 10017-4503

USA

Your Grace,

Easter greetings in the name of our Lord and Saviour Christ Jesus. Stacy and I thank you for your kind letter of April 1, 2004 offering to appoint us as Volunteers for Mission of the Episcopal Church here in Tanzania.

While we are Episcopalians in good standing in the Diocese of Texas, and very much love and respect our dear Bishop Don Wimberly, we cannot accept your offer at this time. When first arriving in Tanzania, we were told in no uncertain terms that we would be asked to leave had we come here affiliated in any way with The Episcopal Church Center. Neither can we represent the ECUSA, in conscience, having denied the truth of scripture and the Church’s traditional beliefs on issues of human sexuality. We categorically reject the consecration of Gene Robinson as an act that is not of God and whose Office we will never recognize.

Our ministry here has been hampered from day one by deep suspicions directed at any one coming in the name "Episcopalian." We can tell you first hand that African Christians feel utterly and brutally betrayed by the Church in America. The consecration of Gene Robinson has caused enormous harm here and emboldened persecution and violence against the Christian Community.

We love you as a Christian brother and pray for you daily. Please do not take this response as an act of malice in any way; we harbour none against you or anyone else who shares a differing opinion on this issue. Our ministry here in Tanzania simply cannot be credible, nor would it be accepted, if affiliated publicly with the ECUSA. In fact it would put us at greater jeopardy than we are at present. Nor can we represent the ECUSA officially because of its sinful actions that are tearing the bonds of our Global Communion. Please keep us in your prayers and be assured of ours.

Sincerely in the Risen Christ,

The Very Revd Jerry Kramer

Rector

Christ Church Cathedral, Arusha

cc: The Rt. Rev. Don Wimberly, Bishop of Texas

The Rt. Rev. Charles E. Jenkins, Bishop of Louisiana

Extract ID: 4720

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: John Masare
Page Number: 329
Extract Date: 15 July 2004

‘The Anglican Church in the Global North needs to repent and reform’

‘The Anglican Church in the Global North needs to repent and reform’

The Very Reverend Jerry Kramer has come to Christ Church Cathedral in Arusha at a time of great controversy in the Global Anglican Church. Recently he spoke to John Masare about his position and hopes for his new Parish.

Question: When did you begin your ministry at the Christ Church in Arusha?

Answer: We arrived in November of last year.

Q: Was this your first visit?

A: No. My wife and I came out in May 2001. I made a second visit in 2002.

Q: How old is the Christ Church in Arusha?

A: Well, the bell was cast in 1893! But I believe that the current church building is 72 years old.

Q: What made you decide to come out to Tanzania?

A: We felt called for foreign missionary work. Before taking a parish in the States, we wanted to serve the global church. When I was in seminary, however, I said that the one place I would not go was Africa. But God has a sense of humor and here we are.

Q: So, how do you feel now?

A: Its been a wonderful, difficult, exciting challenge which has greatly improved my prayer life. There are always those resistant to change because of their own interests, but the people at Christ Church have been most supportive.

Q: What are your views on the controversy within the Anglican Church regarding human sexuality just now?

A: The controversy is far greater than just human sexuality. It’s about how we define the authority of sacred scripture. We are awaiting the outcome of the Lambeth Commission. The key will be how the African and Global South Primates respond; they very much hold the future of the Communion in their hands. The Anglican Church in the Global North needs to repent and reform. Otherwise we have no basis for "Communion." All we can do right now is be faithful and pray for the Holy Spirit’s guidance.

Q: I see a lot of renovation going on?

A: We’re completely renovating the vicarage; the guest wing is now complete. We’re also doing some much-needed work on the church. Ultimately, what we hope to develop is "Cathedral Square." This will include a Center for Evangelism, offices, and classrooms for adult and children’s religious education. This will also be available as a resource for the entire community. We also intend to include shops where youths can train in marketable trades. Good jobs at good wages are always the key for advancement. And with that done, we’ll knock down the old hall and reclaim some green space for a prayer garden and other uses.

Q: What is your vision for Christ Church?

The most important thing for us to keep in mind is first and foremost to seek God’s vision for Christ Church . His dreams are always bigger than ours. Cathedrals have historically been much more than a place just for Sunday worship. They’ve always served as centers for the greater community. Cathedrals should be at the heart of the community’s cultural life, education, service to others, especially the poor. I believe that in being faithful to God’s Will we will live into this role in new and exciting ways. Everything we do should be for God’s glory and there’s so much more we can do.

Extract ID: 4719

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Jill Appleby
Page Number: 2007 02 16
Extract Date: 2006

photo of the Cathedral

Thanks for getting back to me - I guess we must have met at Arusha sometime. Which house were you in? I was North House, also the motto in my day was 'Manner Maketh Man' and remember seeing it in the dining room for the older kids.

I am attaching a photo of the Cathedral (as it is now) where we used to go. I'll send some more sometime.

Take care

Petra McMahon ( was Jill Appleby)

Extract ID: 5176
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