Julia Bruce

Name ID 79

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

Swan Lake ~ Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of our journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we had still sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-Wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last, in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night I felt queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming about outside! When I woke up in the morning, I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2,000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants or buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. 1 eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded in my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater, which we had just visited.

Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson

Extract ID: 5681

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 14-15
Extract Date: 1956

Westminster Abbey ~ Netball ~ The Sea at Night ~ The Vulture

Extract ID: 5682

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Extract Author: Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

School Trip to Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of the journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we still had sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night was very queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming outside! When I woke up in the morning I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the [Ngorongoro] crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants and buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. I eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded at my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater which we had just visited.

authors were probably about eleven years old

Extract ID: 739
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