James Clark

of the American Museum of Natural History

Name ID 108

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 026
Extract Date: 1909

James Clark looks south

As late as 1909, James Clark of the American Museum of Natural History, when hunting along the Kenya-Tanganyika borders in the Nguruman area, looked south across the Serengeti, and was told that it consisted of

'low, hot, fever-ridden country with miles of low bush and little game or water ... a God-forsaken land.'

Extract ID: 165

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 026

Clark's account of his first view of the crater

Clark's account of his first view of the crater is worth recording:

'Imagine yourself standing on the edge of a gigantic bowl twelve miles in diameter with huge sweeping walls rising to a wonderfully uniform height two thousand feet above the level of the bottom. One gazed down upon lakes and forests and plains that were so merged into uniformity by the distance as to seem like nothing more than a gigantic and amazingly smooth floor covered with a patchwork of different shades of green and tan, with here and there the sheen of sunlight on smooth water. I clung there gazing for minutes, making out this and that, and concious of wast numbers of black and white specks that looked very much as peper and salt might look scattered about the bottom of a bowl of dark green jade. I focused my glasses and to my amazement the specks came to life and resolved themselves into enormous herds of wildebeest and zebra. The brightly marked zebra were the tiny grains of salt. The dark wildebeest were the flakes of peper and even when my glasses had shown me positively what they were, I could hardly believe my eyes, so vast were their numbers.'

Extract ID: 678

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 026
Extract Date: 1923

James Clark returned

In 1923 Clark returned, walking with his safari from the railhead at Moshi past Arusha and climbing the rift escarpment near Mtu-wa-Mbu. Pushing on through the country of the Wambulu - the people of the mists - the safari ascended the south-eastern slope of Ngorongoro and after threading their way through the dense cloud forest, paused for lunch in a glade.

Extract ID: 166

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 026
Extract Date: 1923

The party James Clarke camped for three weeks in the Crater

The party [James Clarke] camped for three weeks in the Crater, joined by a lone Englishman, Captain Hurst, who lived on the Crater rim and hunted lion with a pack of Australian Kangaroo hounds. Hurst had been mauled by a lion a few weeks before.

Extract ID: 341
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