James Gibb

Name ID 192

See also

Gibb's Farm Gibb's Farm Brochure
Page Number: 3
Extract Date: 1930-1960

Colonial Times

The first European settlers to arrive were Germans, in the mid-1800s. After World War I Tanganyika became a British Protectorate. Early in the 1930s a coffee farm was established by a German farmer, subsidised by the German Government. During the Second World War, the British Custodian of Enemy Property took over the farm. It was sold in 1948 to James Gibb, a British war veteran, who returned the neglected coffee farm to production. He married Margaret in 1959. Margaret Gibb was born in Tanzania to British parents, she started a small vegetable and flower garden. In 1960 the Ngorongoro Conservation Area was established adjacent to and north of Gibbs Farm.

Extract ID: 272

See also

Marsh, R.J. and E.P Safari Diaries
Page Number: 12
Extract Date: 1955 August 4

Wednesday

We got under way in good time with breakfast, and then went along to the Karatu dukas before leaving at 9.30 for a days visiting of the farms.

First we called at Jimmy Gibbs - almost opposite the Karatu dukas, about three miles off the road. He showed us over his farm - coffee (which is doing very well everywhere in Oldeani this year, nearly ready for picking, and looks a bumper crop), maize and wheat (this has failed nearly everywhere, through rust, a wheat disease. The Tisdalls have written all their wheat off). Gibb is now irrigating his coffee by overhead piping, and giving a regular and uniform spray over a wide area. He taps his water from a stream at the top of the farm, about 6,000 ft. up, near the forest reserve. This has a drop of 2-300 ft. to give him his pressure. He took us up to see the dam he had made at a waterfall. His men had carried all the cement etc. required for this and we followed the path up through the forest which they made. There were evidences of large animals around, though not very recently! The last lap was up a sheer scramble, and Paul hedged at first and almost refused to go further. However we made it and got up to the waterfall, now dry because of the dam, though Gibb opened up the sluice for a while to let the boys see the water drop down over the fall of about 60 ft.

We then went on to Beaumont's, where we had lunch. He is on his own at the moment as his family are still in England. We met his next door neighbour who came over after lunch [Haman]. Coming back on main road, called on Aston and had a long talk with him. Then called at Lutheran Mission before going over to the centre area of Oldeani again to call on the Braunshweigs and then the Notleys on way down. Returned to Karatu by about 6.30.

Extract ID: 577

See also

Marsh, R.J. and E.P Safari Diaries
Page Number: 14
Extract Date: 1956

RJM Trip

RJM Trip:

Friday

Packed for safari and left Arusha, after calls in scholl and town, about 10 for Oldeani. Tarmac to 45 miles. Called on Holmes. Lunch at Ulyate, then across farms to Mtu was Mbu. Pushed on to Karatu. Called at J Gibb for tea. then Hargs and saw Angus. Met Jacksons (Lutheran) on the road, and reached Taylors up on ex-Sands farm, before 7p.m.

Saturday

Out at 11, visited Purchases and van Rooyen. Afternoon very hot and returned to Taylors. Did not go out until after diner to Club.

Sunday

No one came for 8am service! Engine of car a bit 'pinky', so Taylor and I had a go at carburator. Not cleared by 11.00 am so he took me to Club and then went back to see what could be done. Only Hargs and Paddy and 1 child came to 11 am service. Lunch at Taylors, left at 3pm. Straight back to Arusha by 6pm.

Extract ID: 775

See also

Gibb's Farm Gibb's Farm Brochure
Page Number: 3
Extract Date: 1930-1960

Colonial Times

The first European settlers to arrive were Germans, in the mid-1800s. After World War I Tanganyika became a British Protectorate. Early in the 1930s a coffee farm was established by a German farmer, subsidised by the German Government. During the Second World War, the British Custodian of Enemy Property took over the farm. It was sold in 1948 to James Gibb, a British war veteran, who returned the neglected coffee farm to production. He married Margaret in 1959. Margaret Gibb was born in Tanzania to British parents, she started a small vegetable and flower garden. In 1960 the Ngorongoro Conservation Area was established adjacent to and north of Gibbs Farm.

Extract ID: 272

See also

Leakey, Mary Disclosing the Past
Page Number: 207
Extract Date: 1980s

Neighbours

The border with Kenya was closed in 1977 (reopened 17 Nov 1983).....

One effect of the enforced isolation in Tanzania has been to strengthen the ties of friendship and the bonds of mutual reliance between those of us who live on or near the Serengeti. George Dove had left three years before the border closed, and since his departure my closest neighbour has been Margaret Kullander, who has been a wonderful friend. She was born in Tanzania, though of British parents, and has spent most of her life in the country. When I first met her, Jim Gibb, her first husband, was still alive and they run a coffee plantation at Karatu, a village on the road from Ngorongoro to Arusha. After Jim's death, from a stroke, she married Per Kullander, a Norwegian who had been farm manager while Jim Gibb was alive. Gibb's Farm, as it is still called, has become a highly successful lodge and has a fine kitchen garden from which Margaret and Per have generously supplied my camps with superb fresh vegetables, so essential to our well being.

Extract ID: 3426

See also

Gibb's Farm Gibb's Farm Brochure
Page Number: 4

Recent Times

In 1972 Gibbs Farm became a Lodge, James Gibb died in 1977 and the coffee estate - except for a small section for use in the lodge - was sold in 1978 to the Tanzanian Coffee Board. Gibbs Farm is still owned by Margaret Gibb and her husband Per Kullander.

Extract ID: 273
www.nTZ.info