Lisa and Sven-Olof Lindblad

Name ID 343

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space
Extract Author: Njilalo (neogo ta lelo, those are my words)
Page Number: Chapter: The Sirenket, by Lisa Lindblad
Extract Date: 1974

Enkiterunoto, a story of beginnings, a Maasai Genesis Tale

from Mássek, A. ol’Oloisolo and Sidai, J.O. Wisdom of Maaai Transafrica Publishers, Nairobi, 1974, page 8.

Chapter: The Sirenket, by Lisa Lindblad

Enkiterunoto, a story of beginnings, a Maasai Genesis Tale, told by Njilalo (neogo ta lelo, those are my words).

Long ago, hounded by drought and death, the Maasai left their land way to the north and migrated south in search of pastures. The skies withheld their rains, the old ones littered the parches route, the women stopped giving birth. It would take a miracle to make the land green again, to brighten the children’s eyes, to bring milk to the women’s breasts. A miracle occurred. Orkitongoi, the orphan child with a tale, appeared amidst these wandering wretched, carrying a gourd of stones and a herding stick. Wherever he struck his stick, water flowed; where he threw his stones, white flowers grew. The land soon blossomed with new grass and flowers, and the cattle were happy.

...

An old man takes his grandson to the foot of Oldoinyo Lengai, the Mountain of God, and says:

'I am old my child, and many days have passed since the time when I wore the headdress of the black-maned lion. We have been forced by Il Meek to leave our best lands; we no longer fight, for the Maasai say, 'Do not look for stolen cattle armed only with a herding stick...'

Old men do not understand changes. My remaining days are few; the future is of little matter to me. I have lived int he manner of my father and his father. And shall I not die as they did? . . . It is not for myself I fear. I say, I shall die as a Maasai, but I have no certainty for my children.

I have brought you to this place that you might view the Mountain of God, that you might know the home of your father’s father. And it is here that I shall tell you all the ways of the people of Maa, that you may never forget them whatever comes.

And the father responds. 'My father, I hear'.

Extract ID: 1429

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space
Page Number: Foreword: by George B Schaller

As Edward Hoagland phrased it in another context, the Serengeti . . .

As Edward Hoagland phrased it in another context, the Serengeti should be viewed as 'the best and final future place to make a leisurely traverse or enjoy a camping trip that was not rooted in our century.'

Yearning for hope and thriving on dreams, we find what we seek in Serengeti. At least once in a lifetime every person should make a pilgrimage into the wilderness to dwell on its wonder and discover the idyll of a past now largely gone. If I had to select just one spot on earth, it would be the Serengeti. There dwell the fierce ghosts of our human pasts, there animals seek their destiny, living monuments to a time when we were still wanderers on a prehistoric earth. To witness that calm rythym of life revives our worn souls and recaptures a feeling of belonging to the natural world. No one can return from the Serengeti unchanged, for tawny lions will forever prowl our memory and great herds throng our imagination.

Extract ID: 1430
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