Ngorongoro: Roads

Name ID 446

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 175

A brief chronology

1892 Baumann visits Crater (March)

1899c. Siedentopf establishes himself in Crater

1908 Fourie visits Siedentopf

1913 Professor Reek's first visit

1916 Siedentopf departs (March)

1920 British mandate over Tanganyika

1921 Sir Charles Ross, Barns and Dugmore visit Crater: first Game Laws introduced

1922 Holmes' photographic expedition: Hurst living in Crater

1923 The Livermore safari

1926c Veterinary camp established at Lerai

1928 Crater declared Complete Reserve

1930 All Ngorongoro and Serengeti declared Closed Reserve

1932 First motor road to crater rim

1934 Author's first visit to Ngorongoro

1935 Building of first Lodge commenced

1940 East rim road to northern highlands: first National Parks legislation: unimplemented

1948 First National Parks Ordinance receives assent

1951 National Parks Ordinance comes into operation: boundaries of Serengeti gazetted (1 June)

1952 Park administration moves in (August)

1954 D-O. posted to Ngorongoro: cultivation prohibited by law: 'squatters' evicted

1956 Sessional Paper No. i publishes Government's proposals re Ngorongoro and the Serengeti

1957 Committee of Enquiry Report (October)

1958 Government Paper No. 5 announces Government's decision

1959 Conservation Area inaugurated (i July)

1961 Arusha Conference and Arusha Manifesto: author takes over as Chairman of Authority (September)

1963 Authority disbanded and Conservator appointed

1963 Catering first started at Lodge

1965 First Tanzanian Conservator appointed (September)

Extract ID: 2928

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 178
Extract Date: 1934

East rim road to northern highlands

East rim road to northern highlands. [in 1934] there was no road along the east rim - I only constructed it in 1940, though, ... I was looking for an alignment to take a road to the northern highlands as early as 1934,'

Later, Jane Fosbrooke records the return trip from a cattle auction in the north of the crater, to Lerai.

'.. the men arrived from their long tramp. They had walked over twenty miles along the western rim, scrambling up and down gullies. It was very rough, and they decided it would be too difficult to make a road along this side, it would be better to try the eastern side first. Henry's feet were a shocking sight, raw with blisters. We gave them liquid in every possible form - tea, water, whisky and fruit juice, and they lapped it all up, and asked for more'.

Extract ID: 732

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Extract Date: 1940's

It was impossible to take cars into the Crater

It was impossible to take cars into the Crater until the early 1940's and as late as 1955 the guide books were recommending visits not to the Crater, but to the Crater rim to see the game in the Crater 2,000 feet below.

Extract ID: 733

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Martin Davis
Extract Date: 25 Nov 2002

Davis Family

My father's name is Mr Basil George Davis.

He worked for the British Colonial Service and was Senior Superintendent of Prisons in Moshi for 11 years and retired in 1961 when Tanganyika got independence.

He was instrumental in the Building of the road to the Ngorongoro Crater in the 1950's with the prisoners from Moshi Prison.

Dad died some 15 years ago, but the family visiting Tanzania in Feb 2000 and visited the Prison, our school in Arusha and the Crater.

Best regards,

Martin Davis

Extract ID: 4115

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Extract Date: 1950's

Hand built road

There is only one rather narrow, rocky track down into the crater, and another one up. Both were hand built by prisoners in the 1950's. ... The descent to the crater floor takes about 30 minutes because of the steepness and condition of the road. The vegetation on the way down is dense and lush, but there are undesignated viewpoints.

Extract ID: 734

See also

Personal Communication
Extract Author: Martin Davis
Extract Date: 1950's

Road to the Crater

email Nov 2002

My father's name is Mr Basil George Davis.

He worked for the British Colonial Service and was Senior Superintendent of Prisons in Moshi for 11 years and retired in 1961 when Tanganyika got independence.

He was instrumental in the Building of the road to the Ngorongoro Crater in the 1950's with the prisoners from Moshi Prison.

Dad died some 15 years ago, but the family visiting Tanzania in Feb 2000 and visited the Prison, our school in Arusha and the Crater.

Best regards,

Martin Davis

Extract ID: 3644

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 212b
Extract Date: 1959

access to the crater floor

Until mid 1959, access to the crater floor had been by the circuitous route along the eastern rim which I had pioneered in 1940. ... Traffic was controlled on a 'one-hour-down-and-one-hour-up' basis.

This problem was solved by utilising and improving the prehistoric tracks leading down from Malanja to the Semoto corner of the Crater. This was completed in a remarkably short time, for very little money, thanks to the efforts of the Assistant Conservator (Works), the late Gert Fourie, the Headman Isa Lonyoki and his labour gang. This was still a one way track, with gradients of up to 1 in 4, but we avoided waiting and permitted a constant flow of vehicles into and out of the Crater by making one road the descent road, and the other the exit.

Extract ID: 735

See also

Marsh, R.J. and E.P Safari Diaries
Page Number: 20c
Extract Date: 1957 January 1


Extract ID: 4087

See also

Duncan, Brian Arusha Photographs
Extract Author: Brian Duncan
Page Number: 21c
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Road into Ngorongoro crater

I vaguely recall travelling on this road and being chased in the land-rover by a rhino and an elephant (different occasions thankfully).

Extract ID: 5292

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Extract Date: 1959

traffic into the Crater was not regular

In fact traffic into the Crater was not regular or significant till 1959 when the Lerai road was completed.

Extract ID: 736

See also

Smith, Anthony Throw out two hands
Page Number: 171a
Extract Date: 1962

Roads round the rim

In good times the road round Ngorongoro's rim is usable for two-thirds of its circumference. Part of it is always satisfactory. This all-weather section runs from Wilkie's Point, where we had first looked down into the crater and were blind to the animals living there, round past the turn-off to the cliff road, past the village of Ngorongoro, past the Crater Lodge (which is a log cabin type of motel, superbly placed), and on to a spot known as Windy Gap. The road then leaves the crater rim and saunters down towards the huge plains of the Serengeti a couple of thousand feet below. The other portion of the rim road is by no means as reliable. From the junction at Wilkie's Point it travels north around the eastern side of the crater, and it eventually joins up with a minor village called Nainokanoka.

This perimeter system we surveyed, in so far as it was possible to do so. The wind had been blowing initially from the northeast, and therefore we paid most regard to that section up to Nainokanoka. The nearer we could get to that village, the longer the flight would be over the crater region. Unfortunately, no one had reached that village with a light lorry, let alone a heavy one, for several months, and the last heavy lorry to do the journey had left fearful ruts a foot or two deep along the track. We found these could normally be circumvented by driving into the surrounding jungle to make a detour round them; but 8 miles from Wilkie's Point a misguided river had been meandering along the route. This was of no great depth, but it had deposited far too much silt for us to negotiate and the ways round it were too steep. It formed the end of the line.

Extract ID: 3752

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 213a
Extract Date: 1965

Double track descent

A double track descent into the Crater was surveyed in 1965, but work was not started because of the rupture of diplomatic relations with the United Kingdom led to the cessation of the British aid from which this scheme was to be financed.

Extract ID: 737

See also

McHugh, Kathleen (Editor); Willis, Delta (Consulting Editor) Kenya, Tanzania, Seychelles

Crater road

There is only one rather narrow, rocky track down into the crater, and another one up. Both were hand built by prisoners in the 1950's. ... The descent to the crater floor takes about 30 minutes because of the steepness and condition of the road. The vegetation on the way down is dense and lush, but there are undesignated viewpoints.

Extract ID: 3694

See also

Norton, Boyd The African Elephant: Last Days of Eden

the model for the Garden of Eden

Ngorongoro Crater served as the model for the Garden of Eden. I'm convinced of it. ... The whole effect is to create a natural barrier that inhibits human activity, particularly poaching, for reaching the rich game that inhabits the caldera requires a terrifying drive down one of the roughest roads I've seen in Africa - and back out again. (On a white-knuckle scale of one to ten, this road rates a good solid twelve in places!)

Extract ID: 3691

See also

Lansky, Doug Signspotting: more absurd and amusing signs from around the world
Extract Author: Josh Kaplan
Page Number: 104


Signspotter #392 Josh Kaplan (hometown: San Francisco, California, USA)

I was traveling around the world with Jenny, my girlfriend. We were on the road from Arusha to the Ngorongoro Crater, about to camp out with the wildebeests in the crater highlands.

We made our driver reverse the car to see if the sign actually said what we thought it said, and then I snapped the photo.

The road was under construction. And the sign was before an uphill bend. I believe they meant 'You can't see who might be coming down around this bend." Certainly a creative way to phrase it.

The funniest part was when I got out to take the photo, I was asked by the local Tanzanian workers was Japanese (I look about as white American as you get). It turned out the contract for the road was being funded by a Japanese organization, and he assumed I was working for them why else would I photograph a construction sign?

Extract ID: 5483

See also

Lansky, Doug Signspotting: more absurd and amusing signs from around the world
Page Number: 105

Be aware of invisiblity

Extract ID: 5482
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