R.R. (Ray) Ulyate

Name ID 636

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Page Number: 541
Extract Date: 1930's

The end of a man eater - the first and possibly the only photograph ever taken of a Masai lion hunt

Extract ID: 4538

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 044a
Extract Date: 1907

A three-month safari to German East

Another American equally enchanted by Africa was a millionaire Ohio banker, Kenyon Painter, who hired Bronson's hunter, George Outram, and Arusha hunter Ray Ulyate for a three-month safari to German East in 1907. Painter's first safari led to an astonishing collection of wildlife and bird specimens. Between 1907 and his death in 1940, Painter made thirty-one extended hunting safaris. Although little known today. Painter was one of the first to exploit business opportunities in German East on a grand scale, far greater than most pioneer hunter clients in British territory.

Extract ID: 3804

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 101
Extract Date: 11/07/2003

Arusha School

Hi David

Many thanks for your very interesting email.

To answer a couple of your questions yes I am related to Marion Langham. She is my first cousin. Do pass on my email to her if you are in contact.

Our grandparents were Raymond and Marjorie Ulyate (nee Rooken-Smith). Their families were part of the original settlers that landed in South Africa in 1820. My grandfather and his family then went on and became some of the first pioneers around Kajabe in Kenya.

Grandpa started taking people out on safari in the early 1900's. He worked for Newlands & Tarlton He even gets a mention in Theodore Roosevelts Book Äfrican Game Trails" That was on the safari in 1910 .

Grandpa bought Meru Estate near Lake Duluti after the first world war. When enemy property farms were being sold (German). They had that until a Mr K V Painter - an American persuaded him to sell the farm and take over the New Arusha Hotel (It was built opposite "'old man Blooms Arusha hotel" )

Reading from some of Mums notes she remembers that they had The Prince of Wales (first name in the visitors book) attended the opening ball in 1928. So I guess it was around this time the hotel opened.

See the article I am sending. I have heaps of other bit and pieces.

Following are a couple of photos of the hotel and an original postcard with the sign that my Grandpa wrote. I even have a Coloured letterhead of the hotel written to my mother 26 July 1930 .

Raymond and Marjorie had six children.

Jack,

Vivian (my mother who married Boris Borissow)

Thora (Marions Mother who married Oswald Barratt)

Ken,

Malham &

Ted (William)

I think Malham & Ted went to the school and most of the offspring went to Arusha School at some stage.(About 32 of us)

Ted's Wife - Kay Ulyate ran the Sanitorium for a long time. Many a day was spent there with measles, chicken pox or whatever.

Grandpa sold the New Arusha Hotel to their daughter Thora Barratt and also sold their other hotel the Lion Cub at Moshi to my mother Vivian Borissow.

I am sure Marion knows heaps more of the history than I do. I was one of the babies in the family!

Sorry the photos of the school are not too good. Colour has faded. Bryn Jones is the man sitting down, on mount Meru also in the fancy dress photo. Remember those! The 2 sitting at the top were one of the teachers. I wil try and track down my autograph book and then I will be able to tell you some of the names of the teachers at that time. Mrs Bennett was the art teacher I think.

I am glad to hear all your news about the school. What on earth took you back to Arusha and remind me again where you presently live.

I have just spent an hour hunting around. So time has got away.

Take care and please keep in touch and I dont mind you passing on my email to anyone who may remember me.

Marjorie Borissow

PS I caught up with a video made from old cine film taken of one of grandpas safaris. Rare footage.

Extract ID: 4339

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504b

Arriving in Arusha

Grandfather Ray Ulyate was to leave Elmenteita in Kenya in 1923 for Arusha with his young family. He was to purchase a Custodian of Enemy Property coffee farm, Meru Estate outside of Arusha at Lake Duluti. During the (1939-45) war a part of the farm was to become a Polish refugee camp [Tengeru?]. Today the farm is the Headquarters of the Tanzania Department of National Parks and Wild Life

Grandfather Ray was to farm at Meru Estate until 1928 when the coffee market prices and world recession made it virtually impossible for him to carry on farming.

Extract ID: 4743

See also

Crile, Grace Skyways to a Jungle Laboratory: An African Adventure
Page Number: 164
Extract Date: 1927

A night on the escarpment

It recalled to the Chief and me a night we spent on the escarpment, in 1927, when from our lookout over the world, we watched the red sun emerge and finally clear itself above the towering peaks of the Great Rift Valley. As we climbed the wide elephant trails, worn deep into the sandy soil, shrubs, ablaze in color, waved in the early morning light. At the top of a little kopje, we turned aside, Mr. Ulyate leading us to a never-to-be-forgotten sight.

There it lay before us-an emerald lake, sunk deep in the bosom of an ancient volcano, whose sides were green to the water's edge with primeval forests. It seemed the very edge of the world. It was like a leap into the blue.

Fifteen hundred feet above this enormous crater, we stood, looking down on its still green surface, and curling at its edge, floating serenely, was a mass of pink, a solid mass of life-hundreds, thousands, could it be millions of flamingoes? There was not a ripple. There was not a sound.

Suddenly our rifle shot echoed and re-echoed, awakening deep-toned reverberations that must have slept for hundreds of years. With a slow, undulating motion, the entire surface of the lake began to move. The streak of curling pink at the side was spreading. Our glasses revealed birds actually on the wing though, to us, so high above, they seemed still to be floating on the surface of the water.

We stood enthralled. This emerald lake, a mile wide, two miles long-who knows how deep-embosomed fifteen hundred feet below in this ancient crater, snowy Kilimanjaro, silvery Oldonyo-lengai, Kitumbiene, Meru, all serving as guard of these secret fastnesses. It was a scene of enchantment.

As the Chief and I watched these thousands of flamingoes this morning, we could not but wonder if they had cleared those towering peaks to find new hunting grounds, for there in front of us stood the ring of ancient craters.

I'm guessing that she is describing Lake Empakaai

Extract ID: 4524

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: anon
Page Number: 107
Extract Date: 1953

'Piece of History' to vanish

cutting sent by Marjorie Borissow

The news that the New Arusha Hotel is to be rebuilt has met with a certain sadness as well as pleasure.

Of course, the town is pleased that the African Tours and Hotels Ltd. has so much faith in the future of the tourist industry that it is willing to go on with the plans to rebuild the hotel and spend somewhere in the region of £110,000 in the process.

The sadness comes with the disappearance of a "piece of history". How changed life will be when it is no longer possible to sit on the verandah of the "New A" and watch the world go by as one waits for a friend or a bus or just waits!

Royal Reception

Thousands of tourists and V.I.P.'s have passed through the New Arusha and hundreds of dances and dinners have been held there. The first function held in fact took place before it was opened - a dance and reception for the Prince of Wales in December, 1927, the hotel being officially opened the following January.

The New owner was Mr. K.V. Painter an American who leased it to Mr Ray Ulyate. The name New Arusha arose because there had already been an Arusha Hotel across the road owned and run by Jane and Goodall Bloom.

Mr Ulyate started what is believed to be the first safaris by camera at the hotel when he formed his Tanganyika big game and tourist organisation, offereing a seven-day photographic safari in the Serengeti.

Extract ID: 4345

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Page Number: 529
Extract Date: 1930

Photos which you can take too

Extract ID: 4536

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 110

Commercial Trips

... during the 1930's two pioneers rendered great service to wildlife by encouraging the swing from shooting to photography. The first was the late R.R. (Ray) Ulyate, proprietor of the New Arusha Hotel who organised trips on a commercial basis from Arusha to the Serengeti for the purposes of lion photography.

Extract ID: 46

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 110a
Extract Date: 1930's

proprietor of the New Arusha Hotel

[Ulyate, R.R. (Ray)] proprietor during the 1930's of the New Arusha Hotel, was the first to organise trips by road to Ngorongoro and the Serengeti. He established a tented camp at Ngorongoro on the site of the Dulen road turn-off.

Extract ID: 1060

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 111


. . . and an original postcard with the sign that my Grandpa wrote

Extract ID: 4349

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Arusha Integrated Regional Development Plan
Page Number: 32
Extract Date: 1930's

Another stimulus to Arusha's development

Paper III. Urban Development & the Growth of Communications

Another stimulus to Arusha's development was its good position as a tourist centre. As early as 1922 a party came by car from Kenya and set of with porters to the Ngorongoro area. Another came in 1923. There are several books and unpublished diaries describing these early safaris. But the more signficant development occurred in the early 1930's when the making of the road over the Ngorongoro and to the Serengeti enabled Ray Ulyate, the proprietor of the New Arusha Hotel, to organise safaris to the Serengeti where lions were attracted by meat to approach closely to vehicles to permit close-up phototography. Foolish tricks were indulged in, such as tugs-of-war with lions holding a lump of meat at the end of a rope, or even being tempted to jump on the backs of open trucks. These practices were controlled when a Game Ranger was posted to Banagi.

There was considerable incursion from Kenya in the pre-war period, both through Arusha and directly to the Serengeti via Clyne's [Klein's] camp, named after an early white hunter.

Extract ID: 3234

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Page Number: 540
Extract Date: 1930's

Close-up of a lion at a water hole

Extract ID: 4537

See also

Arusha for an African Holiday
Extract Date: 1936

Motor Arrangements at Arusha Season June/October and December/March. European . . .

Season June/October and December/March. European clothes can be worn - a sun helmet is essential.

Chauffeurs' Expenses. Shs 20/- for each night spent away from Arusha must be added.

Booking Instructions. Visitors should endeavour to communicate their requirements to Ray R. Ulyate, who is proprietor of the various hostels on the scenic route and who undertakes to provide transport at the prices stated in the schedule.

Postal Address PO Box 88 Arusha [the New Arusha Hotel]

Route 4..

Lake Manyara, Babati, Hanang, M'bulu, Oldeani, Ngorongoro and back to Arusha. (Circular Tour).

This tour is known as the 'scenic route'. The road has only recently been opened and the trip is strongly recommended, affording as it does the opportunity of visiting Lake Manyara, teeming with bird life, and Ngorongoro, possibly the world's greatesr crater, 12 miles in diameter, 35 miles in circumference, 2000 feet deep and containing about 100,000 head of big game. It is an outstanding sight which should not be missed when visiting East Africa. Marvellous views extending over many miles of the Great Rift Wall can be obtained.

Distance 395 miles

Time 3 days

Fares (including meals and accommodation)

1 person £20/15/0

2 persons £11/17/0 each

3 persons £8/18/9 each

Route 9.

Arusha to Ngorongoro camp and back.

The rest camp erected by the Tanganyika Government on the rim of and overlooking this crater is at an altitude of 8,000ft. and affords an excellent opportunity of seeing the greatest spectacular sights in the whole of East Africa.

(see remarks under route 4)

Total Distance 230 miles

Time 2 days

Fares, including accomodation and meals at the camp

1 person £12/15/0

2 persons £7/0/0 each

3 persons £5/2/0

Extract ID: 25

See also

Arusha for an African Holiday
Page Number: 8

photo of Lions on the Serengeti, plus a car

Extract ID: 1259

See also

Crile, Grace Skyways to a Jungle Laboratory: An African Adventure
Page Number: 187
Extract Date: January 1936

The dining-room at the New Arusha Hotel is unique

After an early lunch the Chief and I left for Arusha, where we arrived at the New Arusha Hotel, which Mr. and Mrs. Ulyate manage so efficiently, in time for tea, a bath, and a change from safari to regulation clothes. It is amazing what an inhibiting effect upon all good intentions a long tub and clear hot water have.

A messenger came to our door to say that Dr. J. H. Parry and Dr. R. C. Speirs were waiting to see the Chief about an urgent operation that they had arranged to be performed by him the next morning at the Government Hospital. I replied that the Chief knew of the appointment, was dressing, and would be ready in a few minutes. It was over forty-five minutes later that lie came shuffling back. He had been sleeping in his bath!

Captain Hewlett dined with us this evening. After the food of camp, Mrs. Ulyate's freshly baked bread tasted like cake, and the fish brought down late this afternoon by airplane from Lake Victoria was all that we needed to spell feast.

The dining-room at the New Arusha Hotel is unique. From the wainscoting to the ceiling the walls are covered with paintings of the Great Rift Valley. Not only were all the familiar peaks and lakes spread out before us, but tucked away, grazing on mimosa trees, was the very group of giraffe we always saw up near the Hot Springs, the herd of impala that lived near our camp, the crotchety old rhino that we bumped into so often, the hippos that wallowed in the papyrus swamp, the lions that we heard every night. The escarpment, the baobab trees, the Masai manyattas - all were there. It was a picture map of the entire district.

Mrs. Ulyate told me that a stranger, hungry and poorly shod, blew in one day. He needed help but had no money. He said he could paint; so Mr. Ulyate made a drawing of the Great Rift Valley, and he followed it.

Mrs. Ulyate showed me some amusing native carvings, one a crocodile swallowing a native woman, feet first, who had slipped down the beast's throat to her waist. Judging from the squirming attitude of the crocodile, it was hard work, but the expression on the woman's face depicted only resignation.

There were also delightful carvings of various wild animals, grotesquely illustrating what to the native's mind were the most dangerous attributes of the different animals. Then there were strange little black figures, some quite terrifying in appearance, therefore devils; others pleasing, so presumably gods.

Captain Hewlett told me of a model of a biplane about three feet long that a native, after seeing- his first airplane, carved from a single section of the trunk of a tree. It shows the four engines in the front, the two wings on either side, the great wheels, and carries the streamline design of the body, even to a perfect tail.

Extract ID: 4528

See also

Crile, Grace Skyways to a Jungle Laboratory: An African Adventure
Page Number: 189
Extract Date: January 1936

Fighting off lions

For many years Mr. Ulyate has been a professional hunter, planning and taking out safaris. He and his son, Kenyon, have recently established week-end safaris from Arusha to Lion Hill in the Serengeti Plains, where "fed lions," as many as fifteen or more at a time, may be seen and photographed on the kills.

Jack, another son, manages the Interterritorial Bus Line between Arusha and Nairobi. This is a great convenience in a country in which the train runs only twice a week, as the bus line runs regularly and takes less time than the train.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Ulyate's family trekked up from South Africa, many years ago, in covered wagons. In those days a wagon pulled by sixteen oxen was the only means of conveyance. For several years Mr. and Mrs. Ulyate lived in one of these covered wagons, hunting the plains for ostrich chicks, and fighting off lions with only tin pans and good lungs!

Extract ID: 4529

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Raphael Avellar - World Telegram Staff Writer
Page Number: 530
Extract Date: 1938

He Has Nodding Acquaintance with Hundreds of Beasts

from a New York Newspaper

Ray R Ulyate, of Arusha, Tanganyika, East Africa, has a nodding acquaintance with several hundred lions.

He knows them, he said today at the Hotel New Yorker, and they know him. And he said he doesn't mean the kind of Lion you see in circuses or zoos.

"Why." said Mr. Ulyate, who is a professional Lion hunter, here to induce more Americans to go on his safaris, "those circus and zoo lions are nothing like the lions we have on the Serengeti Plains. They'r no more lions than a wolfhound is a wolf. They were tame in the days of the Roman Empire."

There was a note of disdain in his voice, and when he spoke of the fellows who entertain circus audiences by entering cages full of lions he laughed out loud.

"There's nothing astounding about that." he said.

Mr Ulyate is 54, tall, broad-shouldered. His skin has been leathered by the weather of many a Lion hunt. He used to hunt with guns, but now he takes out parties armed with cameras.

"I hate to kill now, " he said, "Besides, hunting with a camera is more dangerous and more sport."

He said he had "tamed" lions: he claims he can tell one from another ("easier than I can tell Americans apart") and that now they seem to enjoy being photographed. He started by gragging a dead zebra or hartebeest to a point near a Lion's pride. (A pride is a Lion family.)

Ran for his trucks.

Soon, he said, the lions got used to the free meals. Now they run for his trucks, like cowboys for a chuck wagon. After the cats have gorged members of the safari take all the pictures they want. But they take them from the automobiles and trucks. Mr. Ulyate has never had an accident; but he takes no chances.

He said he is convinced that the wild Lion is amongst the most intelligent of beasts. Lions, he believes, communicate with one another. He says he has often seen lions advancing, retreating, or stopping in their tracks at a sign from the head of the pride.

During his thirty-two years of Lion hunting he has found that many popular beliefs about lions are false.

"Lions don't kill their prey by breaking their necks, " he said. "They suffocate their prey. And they're not afraid of fire. I've seen them come up to our campfire many a nigt and sit right by it. They stay there until we shoo them away."

"Man Killers"

He said most lions will not attack man unless cornered or wounded. The ones that do are "man killers." They become such in areas where natives do not bury their dead, and thus acquire a taste for human flesh.

"Man is to blame for man killers, you see." he said.

Mr. Ulyate is head of Tanganyika Big Game and Tourist Organisation. His wife, fours sons and two daughters assist him in the enterprise, which includes the operation of two hotels.

He was one of the guides on President Theodore Roosevelt's famous expedition lasting a year. "He was an excellent shot and a charming man to be with," Mr. Ulyate recalled.

He said that Kermit Roosevelt who was on the trip, "was not the shot his father was."

Extract ID: 4533

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Raphael Avellar - World Telegram Staff Writer
Page Number: 531
Extract Date: 1938

Several Hundred lions are familiar with Ray R. Ulyate.

from a New York Newspaper - photo caption

Extract ID: 4534

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Raphael Avellar - World Telegram Staff Writer
Page Number: 532
Extract Date: 1938

One of his photos

from a New York Newspaper - photo caption

Extract ID: 4535

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Margaret Thompson
Page Number: 400
Extract Date: 28/06/2003

R.R.Ulyate

Ray Ulyate was my Maternal grandfather, I was fascinated to find him on the WEB, thanks to a sister who lives in London. I would be interested in keeping in touch if you care to contact me. As you see, I live in Australia but I do have a few photos.

I know that he exhibited movies at the Edinburgh Festival just prior to the war breaking out, I believe that film then shown was either lost to torpedoes, or bombing.

Extract ID: 4338

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504h
Extract Date: 1940's

Memories of the New Arusha Hotel

My memories of the New Arusha Hotel were;

A lounge over looking a sunking dinning room. Above the lounge was my Grand parents accommodation, Either side of the lounge and in the dinning room were placed original photographs taken by wild life naturalist Cherry Kearton. The first ever Flash light photographs depicting a Lion and Rhino were amongst the photographs displayed there.

The dinning room walls had a painting of the whole of the East African valley designed by Grand father Ray and painted by a down and out painter looking for work. It was commissioned during the depression years.

The verandah of the hotel over looked the car park. Often seen Safari Trucks and farmers vehicles parked outside especially during lunch times. Wednesdays were farmer’s Market days when produce was laid out on tables to be sold. In those days The New Arusha Hotel was always a hive of activity.

Outside the Hotel was a signed board marking the centre of the East African Territories and half way between Cape to Cairo.

A very large wild fig tree branch taken from Meru Estate was planted on the corner of the Hotel. It grew into an enormous tree.

The Hotel was sold to the African Tours and Hotel Group in 1947. Ray and Anne Ulyate moved to the Lion Cub Hotel to be with my Mother. Grand father was suffering from ill health at the time and was to pass away in 1948

Extract ID: 4749

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Mike Paterson
Extract Date: 29 June 2001

Mike Paterson - remember many of the people on your site

Brilliant site which I constantly refer to.

I was brought up in Tanganyika and remember many of the people on your site not to mention the places.

I collect books about Tanganyika and thanks to digitalsafaris i now have John Millard's book and John Cooke's.

One book which might interest you is called 'The hunter is death' by TV Bulpin which is about George Rushby, hunter,goldminer,and deputy game warden of Tanganyika. He mentions staying at Ray Ulyate's hotel in Arusha.

In follow up I found this page cached in Google

(www.gametrail.co.za/basecamp/OUT%20OF%20AFRICA/ MAN-EATERS.HTM)

The most astonishing and audacious activity of man-eating lions, and the mysterious black magic of lycanthropy, took place in Tanzania in the years during, and just after, the Second World War. Lions and lion men (watuSimba) were inextricably mixed.

Over one thousand five hundred human beings were killed and eaten in the Njombe and Singida districts and a witchdoctor named Matamula Mangera was reputed to be the lord of the lions, controlling their ferocity and directing attacks against people and areas of his choice. The deputy-game warden of what was then Tanganyika, the famous George Rushby, was sent to the area to deal with the lions after the war.

His adventures in a setting of witchcraft, terror and the twenty-two most evil lions ever known to man combined to provide a hunting experience without parallel in history.

His book, The Hunter is Death, records the details of a weird sequence of quite unexplainable events.

Extract ID: 4104

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 100
Extract Date: 16 June 2003

Ulyate Family - Arusha School 1959 - 1965

Just found your website. Well done.. Loved all the photos, brought back wonderful memories.

All my family and relations went to Arusha School at some stage during our early lives in Africa. Ulyate, Borissow, Barratt. There are a lot of us!

My grandparents and family used to own the New Arusha Hotel, and the Lion Cub Hotel in Moshi.

Great to see David Reads name as a contributor. A wonderful man.

Cyril Hampshire and Bryn Jones were the 2 headmasters in my time.

I do have a photo of Bryn Jones and Mr Rush taken when we were attempting to climb Mt Meru.

Would love to hear more and make contact with anyone who may remember us

Marjorie Borissow & Nigel Borissow

Southport, Queensland Australia

Dear Marjorie

Thank you so much for your email and your feedback about the web site.

By co-incidence I had an email at the same time from Marion Langham (nee Barratt) a granddaughter of Ray Ulyate. Do you know each other, and are you all part of the same extended family?

Can you give me any more information about your family and their times in the New Arusha Hotel. Obviously I'd like to put as much as possible on the web, but if there is anything you would prefer was not published, do let me know and I'll respect the request.

You may also have noticed that I don't publish email addresses on the web site, but I'm very happy to put people in touch if you see any names for which you think I might have the contact details.

I've just returned from a trip to Arusha, notable for several things.

One was a visit to the rebuilt New Arusha Hotel. Sadly now it looks much like any other hotel in the world, with it's open polished lobby, and function rooms. The outside, especially away from the street, is more interesting, and the gardens still have some charm. Do you remember it all?

I met a South African Lady who is a manager from the hotel chain which now own/run it, and she had little interest in it's history, although there were two small framed pictures in the lobby (both of which are on my web site).

But I did meet others who were interested in the history of the New Arusha Hotel, and we had fun trying to work out when it may have been built - and by whom. Just about everything I know is on the web site, so I wont repeat it.

I also paid a visit to Arusha School, and was shown around by a couple of teachers and met the headmaster. Very please to see an old boy - even if it was from 50 years ago! Fabric of the place is much the same - even the swimming pool is still there - now empty. Some of the roof tiles have been replaced by tin roofs, and the classes which taught about 300 kids now struggle with 1300.

I saw them again a couple of days later at a cross-country inter schools event, which won! The tradition of pupils climbing Meru still continues.

One of the teachers was delighted to hear about the web site and pleased that old pupils are taking an interest in the school.

I also nearly met David Read - who is still going strong - I met his neighbour, and we tried to arrange lunch, but it didn't work out.

Cyril Hamshere was "my headmaster" and I'm sure Bryn Jones was a teacher in my time. Nay photos you are able to send would be wonderful.

Thanks again for your feedback, and I look forward to any more information that you can offer.

With best wishes

David

David Marsh

www.nTZ.info for information about Northern Tanzania

Harwell, England

Extract ID: 4334

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marion Langham
Page Number: 200
Extract Date: 22 June 2003

Ray Ulyate

I was delighted to find this site as Ray Ulyate was my Grandfather. My mother bought the New Arusha Hotel from my Grandfather and we lived there until 1947 when my parents sold the hotel and moved to a farm called Gararagua at Sanya Juu.

One of Ray's sons is still alive he lives in South Africa.

Kind regards

Marion

Lady Langham

nee Barratt

Dear Marion

Thank you so much for your comments about the web site. I hope you will continue to find things there that interest you, just as they do me.

I've just returned from a trip to Arusha, notable for several things.

One was a visit to the rebuilt New Arusha Hotel. Sadly now it looks much like any other hotel in the world, with it's open polished lobby, and function rooms. The outside, especially away from the street, is more interesting, and the gardens still have some charm. Do you remember it all?

I met a South African Lady who is a manager from the hotel chain which now own/run it, and she had little interest in it's history, although there were two small framed pictures in the lobby (both of which are on my web site).

But I did meet others who were interested in the history of the New Arusha Hotel, and we had fun trying to work out when it may have been built - and by whom. Just about everything I know is on the web site, so I wont repeat it.

Also in Arusha I stayed with someone whose father is at Kifafu Farm, also in Sanya Juu. I don't know how long he's been there, but have emailed to find out more.

I wonder if you have more information about the origins of the Hotel, and how and when your grandfather came to run it.

I'd be grateful for any information you are able to find for me. Obviously I'd like to put as much as possible on the web, but if there is anything you would prefer was not published, do let me know and I'll respect the request.

One of our mysteries is to understand more about a man called Kenyon Painter. One source implies that he "built" the hotel - he certainly invested a lot in the area. On this trip I discovered a stained glass window to his memory in the Anglican Church. Does the name mean anything to you?

And lastly, a few days before your email I heard from a Marjorie Borissow (now in Australia) who was at Arusha School from 1959 - 1965. She says that "My grandparents and family used to own the New Arusha Hotel, and the Lion Cub Hotel in Moshi." Are you all part of the same large family?

Thanks again for your feedback, and I look forward to any more information that you can offer.

With best wishes

David

David Marsh

www.nTZ.info for information about Northern Tanzania

Harwell, England

Extract ID: 4335

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marion Langham
Page Number: 201
Extract Date: 24/06/2003

Ray Ulyate

Thank you so much for you email. It warms my heart to hear of people talking about Arusha, Moshi and of course Sanya Juu I wish I had been with you on your visit to Africa.

I will ramble a bit just writing what comes into my mind.

Ray Ulyate had six children four boys and two girls - My mother was Thora and Marjorie Borissow is the daughter of my mother's sister Vivian so we are cousins. I sent the URL of your Site to several of my cousins and may be that is how Marjorie found the Site. Ray's eldest son's (Jack) wife is still alive she lives in New Zealand and although she is either 90 or just off it she is very interesting and I am sure will be able to tell us why Ray built the hotel.

Did you see the clock just beside the hotel, it is in the "round about". Well Ray calculated that this was exactly half way between the Cape and Cairo and the center of East Africa (as it was then). I have in my possession writing paper from the New Arusha Hotel from the time when my parents owned it. I do know that my parents had to buy the hotel from Ray and found paying for it quite difficult. Dad went to the war and Mum had to run the hotel on her own. Why and how Ray built the Lion Cub Hotel in Moshi is a mystery. I think it was the nicer hotel of the two it had so much character. I remember the hotel totally every detail practically.

I have always wanted to collect information on the family and write a book, I think it is all so interesting. There is so much written about Kenya but there was a different side.

I will find out more for you but I sort of think that Ray built the hotel for one of his American White Hunting clients and when it was ready the person decided not to take it so Ray had to keep it.

I don't know about Kenyon but probably some relation and one of my uncles was called Kenyon I will be able to find out.

Out of curiosity, how did you get into al this?

For the moment.

Kind regards

Marion

PS Where do you live?

Dear Marion

Thanks so much for the "ramblings", and helping to piece things together. So many questions I could ask, but I'll wait to see what else you are able to uncover.

My friend from Arusha got back to say he knows Garagarua; it is basically below Kifufu (his father's farm) on the now non-existent Garagarua River. The farm is, sadly, basically extinct. He says that there is an old Greek farmer, Marios Gikas, who may remember back to the times when you where there - when did you leave?

As for me, I live in England, near Oxford. I gave up my "day job" three years ago so as to specialise in doing web site for safari companies. Really just an excuse to travel to Africa as often as I can. I was in Arusha this time primarily for a Tourism Trade Fair (and the cocktail party in the New Arusha!!), but I do about 8 web sites for people in and around Arusha (and more from other countries). Almost too many because it doesn't give me enough time to work on the nTZ web site.

You mention the Clock Tower - Another question I am trying to answer is to find out when the clock tower was built, and by whom. The note my mother wrote on a photo of the tower says "donated by a Greek", and others have suggested some possible names, but nothing definite. All part of the fun. Did you see the Coronation photos on the web site, which include a (slightly fuzzy) image of the tower with a huge crown on the top of it. The New Hotel uses the compass points as it's logo, and makes mention of the fact that this is because of it's position, but I couldn't see the sign which I remember from the 50's, or any more obvious use of the fact in the promotional stuff.

Thanks again, and I look forward to any more information and memories you may have.

Best wishes

David

Extract ID: 4336

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: June Thomas
Page Number: 439
Extract Date: 30 Sep 2006

I have first hand account of history of New Arusha Hotel

Dear Sirs,

I have just come across your articles written last year (24 Sept 2005) regarding a Dana Bloom from Canada - and the debate regarding the New Arusha Hotel.

My father - Ted Ulyate (now age 89) - son of Raymond Ulyate is very much alive - and if people are really interested in the history of the New Arusha Hotel Dad can give first hand account of events and clear up any problem areas.

By the way - as a child I knew Polly Bloom really well - and he and his family were friends of my parents - I also remember the name of Judah Bloom - both Mum and Dad still speak of the family.

My mother was the sister of the Arusha School (Kay Ulyate) and my father (Ted Ulyate) had a farm out at Essimingor and I am assumed that the luncheon parties mentioned in Marsh, R.J. and E.P Safari Diaries 1953-7 was in fact lunches as my parents farm.

If anyone would like to contact my parents please let me know and I would gladly put you in contact.

Kind regards

June Thomas (nee Ulyate)

Extract ID: 5160

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Margaret Thompson
Page Number: 401
Extract Date: 2007 02 18

Margaret Thompson nee Barratt Oldest of Thora's Children

I was interested to read Marjories recollections, I haven't been able to access this site for some time due to isp probs'

Ted's Name was Winton not William

The Hotel was built an owned by Painters who sold it on to Grandfather.

Ray was the First White Hunter to put down his gun and run hunting with Camera Safaris in East Africa. He would pick up his clients from Dar es Salaam, drive up through the Serengetti and back through Arusha finally to Mombasa where they would go aboard their ship for travel to Europe. Mostly the British India Line, sometimes the Union Castle Lines, but all before air travel.

He took Roosevelt on at least one safari

His movies won awards at the Edinburgh Festival just before the second world war broke out, the film was allegedly lost at sea although some shots were later recognised as being from that film.

Ray was also a brilliant experimental cook, he loved to try out pickles etc.

He had a wonderful imagination and I own the Mural that he had painted by Lone Oak (a tramp who walked from Cape to Cairo and Cairo to the Cape - he would be worth investigating as he was a brilliant Painter and left a legacy of beautiful murals on many homes in the Ol Donyo Sambu area)

The Mural I own depicts the Northern Province of Tanganyika as seen from 20,ooo feet up, drawn & painted just after ww1, it is remarkably accurate and shows what a detailed knowledge grandpa had of the district.

I am the oldest of Thora & Oswald Barrat's Children.

Bryn Jones was the Minister for the Church of England in Arusha, used to wear football shorts and boots under his cassock at church

Extract ID: 5178
www.nTZ.info