Wanyamwezi

Name ID 1364

See also

Ondaatje, Christopher Journey to the Source of the Nile
Page Number: 113c
Extract Date: 1857

Wanyamwezi porters

Given the hardships they had to endure, it is not surprising that during the next few weeks Burton's Baluchi escorts mutinied for more food and threatened to desert with their slaves. Burton and Speke had to consider the possibility of burying most of their baggage and carrying on with the expedition, trusting only to their Wanyamwezi porters to bring them to the lake. However, the storm blew over, Burton says, and they were able to continue. On the way, they caught sight of something that also caught my eye —strange beehives that looked like cannons sticking out of the trees, but were actually constructed of logs or rounds of bark from other trees.

Extract ID: 5742

See also

Ondaatje, Christopher Journey to the Source of the Nile
Extract Author: Richard F. Burton
Page Number: 126a
Extract Date: 1857

Unmarried girls

The Lake Regions of Central Africa

Another peculiarity of the Wanyamwezi is the position of the Wahárá or unmarried girls. Until puberty they live in the father's house; after that period the spinsters of the village ... assemble together and build for themselves at a distance from their homes a hut where they can receive their friends without parental interference.

Extract ID: 5755

See also

Boyes, John (ed. Mike Resnick) Company of Adventurers
Page Number: 121
Extract Date: 1903

Wanyamwezi

I ordered the porters to build a shelter near the remains of the zebra, intending to keep watch during the night for the return of the lions. My blankets and guns were taken into this shelter, and I tied a sheep to a stake fixed in the ground as a lure. After dinner I ensconced myself in the shelter to keep my lonely night vigil. It was a beautiful moonlight night, objects being visible for a good distance, so that if the lions camel felt sure of getting a good shot at them. The silence and peace of the scene had a very soothing effect, and as the hours went by I dozed off to sleep. I was awakened by a low, purring sound, and at once knew that my guests had arrived. My men in camp made the discovery about the same time, and piled more fuel on the fire.

It was now quite dark, as the moon was hidden by a heavy cloud, and as I peered into the gloom I saw what I took to be the stealthily creeping form of a lion. Steadying my gun, I took careful aim and fired. Immediately there was an awe-inspiring roar, and I knew that my bullet had found its billet. I fired again, but could distinguish nothing owing to the darkness. Stealing from my post at dawn to reconnoiter, I could find no traces of the lion. Calling X and some porters, we searched the ground for blood spoor. We found where one shot had hit the ground; the other was nowhere to be seen. We were on the point of packing up and starting the safari, when a shout from X and the porters, who were still out searching, called me to them, and they directed me to a spot where a fine lioness was lying dead in the long grass. I had shot her in the shoulder, and the bullet was still lodged in the skin on the far side. When skinning the carcass, it was amusing to see the men squabbling over the fat, from which they make a salve which is highly valued by them as a cure for rheumatism and other ills. While the cutting up was in progress, I was overwhelmed with the praises and thanks of the cook's wife, an old Native woman who accompanied the safari. She had not been able to sleep all the night, thinking she heard lions roar, and she thanked me for having saved her life.

We packed up and made a short march to the shores of the lake to which I have referred, and here the skin of the lioness was pegged out to dry. We had pushed on because there was no water at the camp; but we were now able to indulge in the luxury of a bathe. After a good night's rest we continued the march, skirting the borders of the lake. The country presented the same features as heretofore-dry grass and thorn bushes—and the water we found was hardly fit to drink. The people inhabiting this part were Wanyamwezi. On going into camp the chief brought the usual sheep.

Extract ID: 3594
www.nTZ.info