John Newbould

Name ID 1412

See also

Smith, Anthony Throw out two hands
Page Number: 128
Extract Date: 1962

At Manyara

The food break was to last half an hour. At the beginning of it a light plane appeared from the north, circled our camp, and then landed between us and the browsing giraffes. Hugh Lamprey and John Newbould stepped out, one a biologist, the other a botanist, and both acquaintances from the past. They had seen the balloon when some 25 miles away during a flight from Arusha to Ngorongoro. They said it was like an orange in a pygmy land, and they had come for a closer look. They accepted beer, and we all sat around gazing at that bright and globular thing.

Extract ID: 3742

See also

Smith, Anthony Throw out two hands
Page Number: 177
Extract Date: 1962

Tobogganning

What we hoped to do was to push off from the rim, with as little lift as possible, and then sink down quickly to the crater floor. 'More like tobogganing than ballooning,' said Douglas, and stared down at the crater 2,000 feet below.

Perhaps it was, but the intention was that the toboggan should cover those 12 miles and then climb up again over the other side to disappear in the general direction of the Serengeti. Anyway, we thoroughly prepared the balloon, attached the ropes inside it, put on the valve, put the net over it, and then loosely rolled it all up in case hyenas felt like chewing it experimentally during the night. We also linked up the cylinders so that, once again, it would just be a matter of turning on the gas in the morning. Most of the Wambulu went off, carrying many complex instructions about bringing more people early the next day as additional ground crew. At this stage John Newbould, pasture research officer for the Ngorongoro district, who had been acting as 'our man' in the area, became firmly sucked into the expedition, and had been offered a place in the basket instead of Alan Root, who had had to go off temporarily to Nairobi. Also Bill Moore-Gilbert, local game warden and sudden balloon enthusiast, was cooperating in every way possible, and most effectively. In short, about twenty-five people would be on hand at the take-off. I did not consider this an excess by any means.

Extract ID: 3753
www.nTZ.info