Stan Lawrence-Brown

Name ID 1439

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 202b
Extract Date: 1957

Tanganyika Tours and Safaris Ltd

Stan Lawrence-Brown, Dave Lunan's former partner, had set up shop at Arusha in 1957. Lawrence-Brown Safaris (Tanganyika) Ltd.'s main competitor was Russell Bowker Douglas, who owned Tanganyika Tours and Safaris Ltd.

Among hunters Russell's firm was affectionately known as Tanganyika Whores and Shauris Ltd. {shauri is Swahili for "ruckus" or "problem"). The firm's letterhead proudly announced, "By Appointment to H.R.H. Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands." Prince Bernhard, or P.B - as he is popularly known in the hunting fraternity, went on four hunting safaris with Douglas. Russell recalled, "P.B. was one of the finest sportsmen I ever met. He liked to take photographs, and would only shoot if an outstanding trophy was found. He actually shoots very little, but he loves safaris!"

Russell was a well-liked fixture in the Tanganyika hunting community. He was as much at home with royalty as he was with rednecks. Russell's firm was staffed with a fine team of young professionals.

[T.T. & S. Ltd.ís hunters: Bob Foster (for a time}, John Fletcher, Anton Allen, Nicky Blunt, Pat Hemingway, Jackie Carlyon, Neil Millar, David Williams, Don Rundgren, Mike Dove. and Chris "Tiger" Lyon.]

Extract ID: 3820

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 204c
Extract Date: 1957

Stan Lawrence-Brown's lieutenants

Stan Lawrence-Brown wasted no time in recruiting lieutenants. He had brought with him from Kenya a young and talented hunter named David Ommanney . Ommanney had worked for both Stan and Dave Lunan during their partnership, having begun his apprenticeship with them in 1952. At Arusha Jacky Hamman came on board, followed in 1957 by hunters George Six, Derrick Dunn, Brian Herne, Nick Swan, and, in 1960 a very good Kenya hunter, Mike Hissey, and Stan's brother, Geoff. On a casual basis Stan hired Douglas Collins, Lars Figgenshou, and, for a time, Greg Hemingway (youngest son of Ernest). Greg's older brother, Patrick Hemingway, was a hunter with Russell's Whores and Shauris, just down the road.

Lawrence-Brown also employed casual hunters and "stooges" Arthur Squiers, Bob Robertson, Royce Buckle, Bruno Crone, Jon Hall, and store manager Dave Turner-Dauncey.

Extract ID: 3827

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 204a
Extract Date: 1960~

Stan Lawrence-Brown had his office in the Safari Hotel

Stan Lawrence-Brown had his office in the Safari Hotel one hundred yards up the street from his rival, Russell Douglas. The Safari Hotel was newer, and probably fancier than the New Arusha, but it did not have the trout river frontage, lovely grounds, or the Old World charm of its rival. The Safari was a four-story rectangular box built of stone and concrete, and in its time the interior was comfortably appointed with lofty rooms. Even today, while the Safari has sunk into obscurity with the advent of newer hotels, one cannot help but notice that this large hotel has all its plumbing on the exterior of the structure, a result of an oversight by the contractors, who had forgotten to include plumbing. The hotel was owned by two aristocratic English sisters, Gladys and Margot Rydon. Both women owned prosperous coffee estates. Gladys lived in a magnificent mansion overlooking a mysterious crater lake called Duluti, seven miles east of Arusha. Margot's son, David, was killed by a buffalo near Arusha in 1964.

Extract ID: 3862
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