Robin Hurt

Name ID 1481

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 383
Extract Date: 1970's

Robin Hurt

By the 1970s most East African hunters were as comfortable in the cockpit of a small airplane as they were behind the wheel of a Land Rover or Toyota. Those who did not fly often traveled beside the pilot as spotters for vague landmarks. In countries where flying was done by dead reckoning, most hunters were as skilled as any navigator at locating bush landing strips, which they had carved out of the uncharted terrain. More than ever before, safaris ranging outside East Africa required the use of light aircraft. In some of these unknown places it was accepted that great opportunity often went hand in hand with great risk.

Perhaps no professional hunter of recent years has more personified the "Have Gun Will Travel" aspect of the modern-day sportsman than Robin Hurt. Robin emerged in the 1970s to become one of the most successful of his generation. Born in London in April 1945 he began his career as a stooge (learner-hunter) with Ker and Downey, then in the mid-1960s joined Uganda Wildlife during the heyday of safaris in that country. A son of Kenya game warden Roger Hurt, who raised his children on a farm at Lake Naivasha, Robin had never wanted to be anything but a hunter. Tall, well-built, and quick-witted. Hurt has an engaging personality and considerable charisma. He is also that rare being in the safari world, a white hunter who understands business. His success has been remarkable.

Extract ID: 3851

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 384a
Extract Date: 1973

Robin only once suffered a physical setback

. . . . . Despite his constant hunting Robin only once suffered a physical setback. The incident occurred near Tanzania's Monduli Mountain. Hurt's client had hit a leopard low with a .375, breaking its shoulder. Reasoning that the brush was so thick he would only have a chance to shoot at close range. Hurt grabbed a 12-gauge shotgun, and gave his usual weapon of choice, a .500 Evans double rifle, to his tracker. Robin knew the leopard would be hard to see in the low light of dense brush, and he figured the spread of Double-0 buckshot pellets would give him a better chance of stopping the cat. Moments later the leopard went for him and Robin fired the shotgun as the cat reached him. The range was so close his buckshot entered the leopard's neck in a tight pattern with no time to spread.

The leopard knocked Hurt down, and he lost his grip on the gun. Robin struggled with the leopard as it mauled his arms and legs, then it abruptly drew away from Hurt, as if exhausted by the attack. Robin realized the shots had taken a toll as his gunbearer quickly finished the leopard with a shot from the .500.

Extract ID: 3852

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 384b
Extract Date: 1980's

Robin Hurt has dominated the African hunting scene

Robin Hurt has dominated the African hunting scene through the 1980s and 1990s, and he operates Robin Hurt Safaris based in Arusha.

Extract ID: 3853
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