Leganga

Name ID 2358

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 079
Extract Date: 1910

Gottlieb Immanuel Bauer

Gottlieb Immanuel Bauer (1881-1927) was the son of Gottlieb Bauer of Höfen near Winnenden (Germany), who had served as a missionary in Nubia in the 1860s and had come to Palestine in 1869 and settled in Bethlehem as a shoemaker. After the early death of his father, Gottlieb Immanuel was raised in the Syrian Orphanage in Jerusalem. At age 16 his step-father and guardian, G. Strecker, enabled him to return to his father’s native Württemberg to serve an apprenticeship as a mechanic in Stuttgart-Feuerbach. After its completion he returned to Palestine in 1902 and took up employment as master mechanic in the Wagner Bros Foundry and Engineering works, and as trained well-driller, constructed numerous wells in the coastal plain between Gaza , Sarona and Ramleh. His ability to locate underground water sources with the dowsing rod was a gift that in later years in East Africa would prove quite beneficial.

In 1906 he married Pauline Elise Blanckertz (born 1886) - daughter of the affluent Jaffa beer brewer Johann Albert Blanckertz.

In 1910 the family left Palestine and settled in Leganga in German East Africa.

Extract ID: 5622

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 085
Extract Date: 1910

Leganga

The 1200 hectare property was located on the Maji-Tschai River that earned its name from the swampy brown tea-coloured water it carried. Gottlieb Bauer dug a small channel from this waterway to bring water to the house and farm, however as there was some doubt about the water quality being suitable for human consumption, a well was dug close to the farmhouse. Whilst digging his well Bauer hit bedrock and was unable to reach any water. In the following weeks he prospected his land with pick and dowsing rod in order to find underground water sources and dug at several sites. He soon came to realize that under most of his property there was a massive layer of rock in depths of 1-3 meters that could neither be dug nor drilled though. His hopes to plant coffee here were thus shattered, as coffee plants require deep soil to grow due their long taproots.

Extract ID: 5618

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 090
Extract Date: 1911

Gottlieb Bauer prospected the terrain

During the dry season of 1911, Gottlieb Bauer prospected the terrain around the town of Arusha for a better spot to establish his family. He had soon found suitable land in the beautiful forest area on the Temi River in the Wa-Arusha tribal territory. The land was in sight of Arusha located between the villages of the chiefs Angarashi, Toronge, and Mekogi. The river had year round water and enough flow to power a mill. The Bauers bought a further 400 hectares of land there intending to farm coffee and vegetables, but Gottlieb’s main focus was to built a grain- and sawmill as well as an oil-press. During 1911 Elise, his wife, and his mother, Friedericke, remained with the children in Leganga (where in December 1911 Rudolf was born), and continued with the vegetable and grain farming, while Gottlieb built a permanent house on the Temi River with several large sheds for all his tools and equipment, a lathe and workbench as well as a blacksmith workshop.

Extract ID: 5619

See also

Glenk, Helmut, with Blaich, Horst, & Gatter, Peer Shattered Dreams at Kilimanjaro
Extract Author: P. Gatter
Page Number: 099
Extract Date: 1912

The Bauers left Leganga

In early 1912 the Bauers left Leganga and resettled in their new house on the Temi River. From Rudolf Bauer’s memoires a good description is available of a typical settler family home and its surroundings: “It had a solid foundation and was built up to the raised ground floor with cement and then with bricks, which my father had manufactured with the help of native employees. In a mud pit the clay was pounded with the feet and then filled into wooden moulds and dried in the sun. In this way two large rooms emerged. In the front was the living- and dining room, and behind it the parents’ bedroom. A wide staircase led upstairs. To the right of these stairs was the bedroom for us children. The left side served as a provision room. There non-perishable food stuffs were stored, such a 2 sacks of raw coffee, one or two sacks of rice, as well as a large sugarloaf. The roof of the house was covered with corrugated iron. In front of the residence was a porch […] Behind the building a beautiful flower garden had been created of which our gardener Lempoto was in charge[…]The living quarters and the kitchen building were about 20 meters from the mill-stream. On the right hand side a path lined by lemon trees led to the brick oven. To the left of the garden was an alley of cypress trees. Opposite of the residential building was a big poultry yard, in the middle of which was a large pond for geese and ducks. Many chicken, guinea fowls, and turkeys were kept in the chicken shed, which was raised very high off the ground to provide safety from predators. Next to it was also a pigsty.”

Extract ID: 5620
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