Introducing East Africa

Introducing East Africa

MacMillan, Mona

1952

Book ID 159

See also

MacMillan, Mona Introducing East Africa, 1952

At the top of the rift there is more emptiness

At the top [of the rift] there is more emptiness until one comes equally unexpectedly on the outlying wheat fields of the Oldeani settlement. The little group of European farms was originally German - most of the present farmers took over enemy property as a going concern after the latest war, and with prices high have been doing well ever since without as much effort as is normally required of the settler. Their wheat maize and barley looked fine, and on the high lip of the Ngorongoro Crater, which we only saw from a distance, they grow coffee. They are administered from Mbulu about thirty miles to the south, and it would seem that up to the present they are rather an anarchical group having achieved little or no sense of community. According to their overlord, the D.C. of Mbulu, they had little good to say of each other when he visited them; there wives were kept busy embellishing their houses with the rich proceeds of each years crop, also a clubhouse was in the process of being built, and the German school was being used by one form of the overcrowded Arusha European boarding-school.

Extract ID: 772

See also

MacMillan, Mona Introducing East Africa, 1952

the new road.

...the new road is being cut through some of the shambas of the Warush, greatly to their indignation. These first class roads must have for the sake of drainage a 100 foot 'road reserve' on either side, which is wasteful of land in populated areas. This stretch of road will be first class when it is finished. ...

Along the first stretch of road to the south there is a great coffee estate owned by Nestles, from which comes Nescafe, and the great firm has advertised itself in the most civilised way imaginable by planting both sides of the road with an avenue of gorgeous flame trees- the trees of a fine size and covered with their lamp-like blossoms were a most exhilarating sight.

Extract ID: 296

See also

MacMillan, Mona Introducing East Africa, 1952

This country [writing from Oldeani] is said to be waterless

This country [writing from Oldeani] is said to be waterless and for some reason it is seldom visited by the Masai. ...

At the foot of the cliff and at the northern end of the lake there is a queer village with the name of Mtuwambu [sic] 'the river of mosquitoes'. It has a sinister air and is in fact the refuge of people who are not much wanted by their neighbours at home, and so are brought together in this utterly deserted stretch of country..

Extract ID: 636
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