The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953)

The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953)

Gordon-Brown, A (Editor)

1953

Book ID 312

See also

Gordon-Brown, A (Editor) The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953), 1953
Page Number: 100
Extract Date: 1893

Sisal was introduced into Tanganyika from Mexico in 1893

Sisal was introduced into Tanganyika from Mexico in 1893, ten years before it was planted in Kenya

Extract ID: 1362

See also

Gordon-Brown, A (Editor) The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953), 1953
Page Number: 340
Extract Date: 1953

Arusha

Arusha, 4620 ft., 297 m. from Tanga, white pop. of district 740 (four hotels) is the business centre of an extensive coffe district located on the slopes of Mount Meru, provincial headquarters, realhead and shopping center for the Masai and Mbulu districts, the latter including the Oldeani and Babati settlement areas. Arusha is well watered (two rivers hold trout), the soil is very fertile, the rainfall good and the heat is tempered by the prevailing winds which blow from the glaciers of Mount Kilimanjaro. There is much fine scenery and the great Game Reserve of the Serengeti Plains is within easy reach by car. Sports club, Swimming Bath. Arucha was occupied by the British on March 20th 1916. Gymkhana club with 9 hole golf cource, tennis, etc. Two missions. The population of the district is increasing rapidly.

Interesting to compare this with the 1927 entry.

Extract ID: 3547

See also

Gordon-Brown, A (Editor) The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953), 1953
Page Number: 340

Kibo

Kibo, the western summit [of Kilimanjaro] is called by the Masai "Ngaje Ngai" the House of God

Extract ID: 385

See also

Gordon-Brown, A (Editor) The Year Book and Guide to East Africa (1953), 1953
Page Number: 340 footnote
Extract Date: 1854

Dr. Ludwig Krapf a German by birth

Dr. Ludwig Krapf a German by birth, was a British Missionary. In 1854, he challenged the Church Misisonary Society to make the grave of his wife and child, near Mombasa, the starting point for the conversion of E. Africa, a challenge which the Society at once accepted.

Extract ID: 1312
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