Professor W.H. Pearsall D.Sc. F.R.S.

Name ID 488

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space
Extract Date: 1956 Nov

Quain Professor of Botany at the University of London

Quain Professor of Botany at the University of London. Engaged in 1956 by Flora and Fauna Preservation Society of England to carry out an ecological survey of the Serengeti, and to produce a report which would resolve the boundary controversy. His report, based an a two month visit to the area in Nov-Dec 1956 in effect formed the scientific basis of the recommendations of the Committee.

Extract ID: 813

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 045
Extract Date: 1956

John Hunter of Oldeani flew Professor Pearsall

John Hunter of Oldeani also flew Professor Pearsall over large isolated areas in his private plane. John, one of the Park Trustees and later Chairman of the Board, was always in the forefront of conservation in Tanganyika, and his advice and influence played a very important part in the outcome of the future negotiations with the Government.

Extract ID: 1307

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 198
Extract Date: 1956 July

three man Committee of Enquiry set up.

three man Committee of Enquiry set up. Sir Ronald Sinclair (Chairman), Sir Landsborough Thomson, and Chief Humbi Ziota. In the event the Chairman was not available and replaced by Sir Barclay Nihill. Mr. F.J. Musthill also joined. Evidence from many people, including Prof Pearsall, commissioned by the Fauna Preservation Society to represent the British case. His report, based an a two month visit to the area in Nov-Dec 1956 in effect formed the scientific basis of the recommendations of the Committee.

Extract ID: 696

See also

Huxley, Juliette Wild Lives of Africa
Extract Author: Julian Huxley

Postscript

Part of our time [at the Arusha Conference] was devoted to finding out whether the terrible drought of 1961 was the final culmination of a long destructive process of habitat damage by the Masai, or a recurrent phenomenon of the Tanganyika climate. Both conclusions it appeared, were true. Eventually one elder recalled that the streams had failed once before in tribal memory, about forty-five years ago. On the other hand Professor Pearsall soon made it clear that there had also been a serious deterioration of the habitat.

I should recall that in 1956, as a result of the Tanganyika Government's inept handling of the problem, Pearsall had been commissioned by the Fauna Preservation Society in Britain to examine the entire problem of the Serengeti National Park area, including Ngorongoro and the rest of the Crater Highlands; and as a result the government was impelled to set up a high-powered Commission of Enquiry and eventually to establish the Conservation Authority. Here was a first class ecological mind, backed by first-hand local experience.

Extract ID: 75
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