Tanganyika Guide

Tanganyika Guide

1948

Book ID 313

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 016 -foreword

Sir William Denis Battershill

Governor of Tanganyika

Extract ID: 104

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 058
Extract Date: 1948

Great North Road

The road leaves Arusha township in a direction due west for the first nine miles, thereafter tending southwards in a great curve to the west, until it passes the eastern shores of Lake Manyara, 65 miles from Arusha. Thence the road follows a line due south through Babati and on to Pienaar’s Heights, the whole route being beaconed on each side with magnficent isolated peaks.

Extract ID: 295

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 068a

Mount Meru

Extract ID: 4356

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 068b

Lake Duluti

Extract ID: 4357

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 069
Extract Date: 1948

Typical safari starting from Arusha

It would take a book to describe the variety of sport to be had in the areas where shooting is permissible, and there is only space here to give a brief sketch of a typical safari starting from Arusha by car and motoring by way of Engaruka, Ngorongoro Crater, and the Serengeti plains.

Arusha itself may be reached by air, by road or by railway. Ten miles out of the town antelope, giraffe and zebra can often be seen. Forty miles further comes the first view of the Rift Wall, that great crack in the Earth's surface which cuts through Africa almost from north to south. Lake Manyara can be seen under the dark shadow of the Rift. At seventy miles out the road turns northwards along the Rift Valley through great herds of game to Engaruka. On the left there is the great wall of the Rift Valley, and away on the right is open undulating country, with many herds of game and Masai cattle sharing the grazing and living in harmony.

The green swamp and forest belt at Kitete conceals many buffalo and rhinoceros, and elephant and hippopotamus occasionally visit the place. To the right the plains are covered with hundreds of termite hills. Grant's gazelle, ostrich and impala will be seen on the way as well as giraffe, accompanied often by their young, who gaze with soft eyes at the car and sometimes allow it to pass within a few yards of them.

At Engaruka there are stone ruins of a great village where the inhabitants were perhaps once concentrated for defence against the Masai. On a frontage of about three miles tier upon tier of terracing is still clearly visible and closer inspection shows the rock-built homes, the graves and the huge cairns of a vanished people. From Engaruka Masai bomas may also be visited without difficulty.

During a stay of a week in this neighbourhood lion, zebra, Grant's and Thomson's gazelle, impala, wildebeest, rhinoceros, oryx and gerenuk may be obtained.

From here Maji Moto, sixty miles south along the Rift Wall, may be visited. The hot springs there seem to be a natural spa for wild life and there will be found spoor of elephant, rhinoceros, buffalo, lion and all kinds of smaller game. The place is a game photographer's paradise.

Lake Manyara, seen from the hot springs, has a great variety of birds, including thousands of flamingoes. On from here the route lies over the Rift Wall up steep slopes to the Ngorongoro Crater.

The first view of the crater is magnificent ; it is one of the greatest in the world, the floor, twelve miles across, lies 2,000 feet below the precipitous walls, covering an area of approximately 100 square miles. The drive along to the Ngorongoro Crater Rest Camp is one thrill after another, each succeeding view of the crater being more beautiful than the last. Suddenly the most delightful camp is sighted-a group of about twenty log cabins, in the most wonderful natural setting. A night or two may be spent here* and the great concentration of game on the crater floor may be watched with glasses. Thousands of animals make their home in the crater throughout the year.

Then the way leads into the Serengeti Plains which may one day become the greatest national park in the world. In a stay of a few days in the Serengeti great concentrations of game will be seen, It is not uncommon for visitors to photograph as many as fifty different lions in a stay of only a few days, and the masses of game have to be seen to be believed.

On the return route the visitor can go to Mongalla, west of Oldeani Mountain, where hippopotamus, rhinoceros and other big game may be hunted, then pass through Mbulu, camp in the game area at Basotu Lake, go past Hanang Mountain and Babati Lake and so back into Arusha. Such a trip gives a month of enjoyment . which for the lover of wild life cannot be surpassed, and it is only one of many that can be made in the game areas of Tanganyika Territory, the finest hunting ground in the world.

Extract ID: 4355

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 141
Extract Date: 1948

Garden at Ngare Sero

Another Tanganyika garden which lingers in the memory is at Ngare Sero, near Arusha, where one can see poinsettias in pink and cream, as well as the better known scarlet, mirrored in the still waters of a lake and forming an effective finish to banks of salvia and massed cannas of every shade immaginable.

Extract ID: 4353

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 142
Extract Date: 1948

Garden at Ngongongare

Then there is the garden at Ngongongare ("the place of many-sounding waters"), in the same neighbourhood, a beauty spot which has been brought to perfection despite the nightly incursions of elephants and rhinoceros, where the most wonderful collection of shrubs and flowers has been assembled from all parts of the world.

Extract ID: 4354

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: 146
Extract Date: 1948

Arusha School

Managed by the Government. Fees, including tuition and board, £64 10s. Per annum. Situate in Northern Province on Tanga-Arusha Railway. Height 4,500 ft. Reduced fees for second and third children.

Extract ID: 4352

See also

Tanganyika Guide, 1948
Page Number: cover
Extract Date: 1948

Cover

Extract ID: 4424
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