Rhino

Name ID 523

See also

Cole, Sonia Leakey's Luck
Page Number: 112-113
Extract Date: 1935

The man who mended the clutch

After this brief reconnaissance [to Laetoli] they returned to Olduvai to find that the pool which they had been using for their water had turned to mud and become the property of a resident Rhino, who used it for his daily ablutions. Worse still, in order to keep the wallow moist he urinated into it freely. More inviting water supplies were available both at the spring at Olmoti and at Ngorongoro, but petrol was too short to be used for this purpose. They tried to collect rain water off the roofs of the tents, forgetting that the canvas had been impregnated with insecticide; there were dire results, and all the party were violently ill after drinking the water. By this time they were also running short of food. Sam White and Peter Bell were due to return to England, and the lorry taking them back to Nairobi was to bring much needed supplies to the garrison at Olduvai; but it never returned.

For the next fortnight Louis and Mary's diet consisted almost entirely of rice and sardines. An even greater hardship was the lack of cigarettes, and they had to resort to picking up fag ends scattered round the camp. When the lorry failed to appear after two weeks they set out to look for it. At one point they had to turn back as the road was in such a terrible state, and they spent the rest of the day helping to extract Indian traders' lorries from the mud. Their reward was a little flour and sugar, but they were still very hungry. Next their own car overturned in a gully, and they spent a whole day trying to extricate it with a plate and some spoons. (The lack of proper tools seems curiously uncharacteristic of Louis, who was usually so efficient.) Watching their efforts was a crowd of supercilious Masai warriors who considered it beneath their dignity to do any manual labour. It was just as well that Louis did not try to press them: almost at that very moment the District Commissioner at Narok was being murdered by Masai for ordering them to help with road work. Louis and the Masai treated each other with mutual respect, and many of them had cause to be grateful for the treatment they received at the clinics he ran at Olduvai.

The lorry turned up just in time to pull the car back on to the road - its delay had been caused by clutch trouble. (By a curious coincidence the man who mended the clutch at the Motor Mart in Nairobi became Mary's nearest neighbour at Olduvai thirty-five years later: he is George Dove, a 'character' with magnificent waxed moustachios who ran a delightful little tourist lodge at Ndutu, some thirty miles from Olduvai, in the early 1970's.) The car itself was in far worse condition than the lorry had been, with the whole of the bodywork damaged, but amazingly it was still able to run. Louis and Mary returned to Olduvai to pack up before setting off for their next target, a place called Engaruka.

Extract ID: 3126

See also

1942 Publishes: Moore, Captain 'Monty', V.C letter from the Game Warden, Lyamungu, Moshi
Page Number: 46


Extract ID: 1213

See also

Moore, Captain 'Monty', V.C letter from the Game Warden, Lyamungu, Moshi
Page Number: 46
Extract Date: 1942

rhino was killed by Mr. J. van Rooyen

The cow [Rhino] was killed by Mr. J. van Rooyen of Oldeani. It had been raiding on his farm. Unfortunately for him he was not in possession of the necessary licence and so the trophy became the property of the Government.

length of front horn, outside curve 47 1/4 inches - second largest world's known record.

letter with photos of rhino horns taken from animals killed in Tanganyika since the outbreak of war in 1939.

Cow killed by van Rooyen (qv).

Bull killed by a spear earlier in 1942, in the Ngorongoro country by a Mbulu herdboy. It was apparently disturbing his goats. This trophy also became government property.

Extract ID: 1262

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Extract Author: Siedentopf, A.R.
Page Number: 099
Extract Date: 1947

The Last Stronghold of the Big Game

(No relation to the Siedentopf brothers).

In a contemporary [1947] account of the clearing of the Oldeani coffee shambas:

'All the other game learns quickly that it is best to avoid contact with man, and changes its trail accordingly. Only the Rhino persists in the precedence of the right of way. So the stupid beast goes on stamping through the fields and flattening time and again the tender coffee seedlings which the farmer replaces meticulously day after day. Then comes the hour when the planter's cup of wrath overflows and the bully gets himself shot.'

Fosbrooke, quoting from The Last Stronghold of the Big Game

Extract ID: 946

See also

Duncan, Brian Arusha Photographs
Extract Author: Brian Duncan
Page Number: 15h
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Shot rhino 1

The animal had killed a couple of local Africans. Father is on right (donít know other chap, Royce Buckle?).

Bullet hole clearly visible on rear of front left shoulder (heart shot). I think the rifle was a .450 Nitro Express (my dadís favourite calibre for large game).

Tom Linton says: The other man standing over the rhino looks very much like like Mr. Krokowski (polish refugee from Nazi occupied Poland). He owned a jewelry store around the corner from the grocery store on the corner of the town square/roundabout. He had mines around the country, was chief of police, and a big game hunter for many years (trading in ivory), and was eventually killed in his small aircraft on the slopes of Monduli hills. He got into a slip stream and couldn't pull out. His son Joseph survived and lives in London. I was supposed to go up with them that day, but my mother had a call from Mrs. Watts (who lived out past Lake Duluti) asking if I would take out her daughter Dawn, horseriding. After a heated argument, my mother won out, and I had to ride the six miles out there to take Dawn riding!

Extract ID: 5299

See also

Duncan, Brian Arusha Photographs
Extract Author: Brian Duncan
Page Number: 15i
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Shot rhino 2

Boy, were they chuffed!

Extract ID: 5300

See also

Huxley, Juliette Wild Lives of Africa
Extract Date: 1960

no rhino

I was sorry not to see any elephant or Rhino on this trip. The rhinos are being killed by the Masai at an alarming rate, always, they say, in self-defence. Phersen reported the year's total of killed Rhino - found minus horns by his scouts - at thirty-six. This year there are six or eight pairs left in the crater. Next year there may be fewer.

Extract ID: 820

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope
Extract Date: 1961

Rhino at Olduvai Gorge

The Olduvai Gorge used to be full of Rhino. And then, in 1961, in the space of six months, the Leakeys counted over fifty rotting carcases in the Gorge, all speared by Masai. Whether or not their motive was political, they had taken the profit; every horn had been removed.

Since then the Leakeys have not seen a single Rhino at Olduvai. This is typical of what is going on all over East Africa. The Rhino cannot hold out much longer.

[but see Fosbrookes comments in 1972]

Extract ID: 345

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 096b
Extract Date: 1963

Rhinos at Oldupai

... I have rejected some of the wilder statements concerning the killing of Rhino in and around Ngorongoro, particularly one by Elspeth Huxley in Forks and Hopes, published 1963,:

'The Olduvai Gorge used to be full of Rhino. And then, in 1961, in the space of six months, the Leakeys counted over fifty rotting carcases in the Gorge, all speared by Masai. Whether or not their motive was political, they had taken the profit; every horn had been removed.

Since then the Leakeys have not seen a single Rhino at Olduvai.'

This demonstrably false account is unfortunately typical of the wildlife 'crusaders' and illustrates how a good case can be discredited by exaggeration. John Goddard's work has shown that the gorge was inhabited (1966) by over 70 Rhino. With an animal of such static habits it is clearly impossible that the population built up from nil to 70 between 1963, when Elspeth Huxley was writing, and 1966.

Extract ID: 348

See also

Ngorongoro's Annual Report
Page Number: 28b
Extract Date: 1966

Felicia engages the lion

While we can always guarantee that you will see thousands of animals, it is more a matter of luck to witness interesting game incidents or even to see some of the rarer species. For instance, the lion-and-Rhino battle on August Seventh, which was reported in detail in the October issue of Ngorongoro's Bulletin. For the benefit of those who did not read the bulletin this is what happened: on August Seventh, an extremely interesting incident concerning a Rhino and a lion was observed in the crater by Licenced Guide Shehe. At 10.30 a.m. a lion tried to kill a Rhino, Felicia's eleven-month-old calf. Felicia who lives to the north of Lake Makat is rather hostile normally, and when her off-spring was in danger she was quite fierce. The lion managed to separate the calf from the mother. The calf ran away and the lion gave chase, with Felicia lumbering behind in hot pursuit, bellowing loudly. The calf circled back towards its mother, and Felicia immediately engaged the lion. The lion grabbed her by the hind leg and clawed and chewed her thigh viciously. Felicia wheeled round and gored the lion twice in the centre of the ribs. The lion rolled over paralysed by the tremendous blows. She then gored him in the neck, in the head and trampled him to death in a matter of minutes. Two other lions had sat by during the entire incident and kept a respectable distance. Within forty minutes of the killing the carcass was eaten clean by hyaenas. It is understood that a party of visitors from West Germany was lucky enough to film or to photograph the whole act.

Extract ID: 3921
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