Jackie Hamman

Name ID 1455

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 215a
Extract Date: 1950's

Dr. George Six

Dr. George Six, a London physician, was an unlikely member of Tanganyika's hunting community. He had come to Africa not with the intention of practicing medicine, but to purchase a farm. Six and his English wife, Mary (nee Bell), the daughter of a judge, rented a house outside Arusha. George soon made the acquaintance of Jacky Hamman at Arusha's government administration building, known as the boma, where Hamman was purchasing game licenses for one of his safaris.

The suave and sophisticated George Six was Hamman's diametric opposite in every way - in physique, temperament, education, intellect, and background - yet the two became firm friends.

Once settled in Arusha Dr. Six opened a gun shop next door to the Safari Hotel where Lawrence-Brown Safaris, Jacky Hamman's outfit, was located. He then purchased two thousand acres in Tanganyika's densely wooded Kiru Valley, south of Lake Manyara. The farm was virgin bushland and lay close beside the wall of the Great Rift Valley, only a few miles from Magara, where Bror and Cockie von Blixen had once lived at Singu Estates. George's acreage was in Tsetse Fly country and useless for domestic animals because of the deadly tsetse-borne disease, trypanosomiasis. In such regions in Tanzania there is an almost total absence of human settlements due to tsetse flies, but nearly always there is an unusual abundance of wildlife, and the Kiru Valley was no exception. In the 1950s it was chock-full of game, particularly elephant, rhino, and buffalo, and provided plenty of sport for the hunting enthusiast.

Extract ID: 3834

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 215b
Extract Date: 1956

Six becomes a director

When George Six decided to take up hunting as a full-time occupation, Jacky Hamman helped him get the experience he needed to qualify for a professional hunter's license. It was Jacky who told Stan about George and what a great asset he would be to Stan's outfit. When Lawrence-Brown met George he agreed with Jacky's assessment. The relationship proved beneficial - Six invested in Stan's firm, and in 1956 he became a director and one-third shareholder of Lawrence-Brown Safaris.

George eagerly took up big game hunting and Hamman was his mentor. Between professional safaris the pair hunted elephant together in every corner of Tanganyika. Jacky's influence was apparent with George's choice of a heavy rifle. Unlike Jacky, George was big, powerfully built, and strong, but like Jacky he exclusively used a .577 Manton box-lock double rifle.

Hamman, the experienced hunter, returned George's admiration. "That George is something else," Jacky liked to say. "He can tell you about removing an appendix, fixing a diesel injector, give the Latin name for some kind of mud fish, or you can ask him about the muzzle velocity of anything, and he can damn well tell you right now."

Extract ID: 3835

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 204c
Extract Date: 1957

Stan Lawrence-Brown's lieutenants

Stan Lawrence-Brown wasted no time in recruiting lieutenants. He had brought with him from Kenya a young and talented hunter named David Ommanney . Ommanney had worked for both Stan and Dave Lunan during their partnership, having begun his apprenticeship with them in 1952. At Arusha Jacky Hamman came on board, followed in 1957 by hunters George Six, Derrick Dunn, Brian Herne, Nick Swan, and, in 1960 a very good Kenya hunter, Mike Hissey, and Stan's brother, Geoff. On a casual basis Stan hired Douglas Collins, Lars Figgenshou, and, for a time, Greg Hemingway (youngest son of Ernest). Greg's older brother, Patrick Hemingway, was a hunter with Russell's Whores and Shauris, just down the road.

Lawrence-Brown also employed casual hunters and "stooges" Arthur Squiers, Bob Robertson, Royce Buckle, Bruno Crone, Jon Hall, and store manager Dave Turner-Dauncey.

Extract ID: 3827

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 217a
Extract Date: 1958 January

Death of Jackie Hamman

It was not to be a lion, leopard, buffalo, or black mamba that killed zestful Jacky Hamman in the prime of his life. In January 1958, David Ommanney , the gifted star at Lawrence-Brown Safaris, was sharing a hunting camp with Hamman and Geoff Lawrence-Brown, Stan's younger brother.

Jacky, like many South African hunters, had a tremendous love of antique guns, exposed-hammer firearms in particular. Before his safari with Ommanney , Jacky had purchased a new Land Rover pickup truck from which he had removed both doors in order to give himself and his clients quick and silent exit when hunting.

Jacky and his client went out guinea fowl hunting in the Mto-wa-Mbu (Mosquito River) area in northern Tanganyika. Hamman, the quick-shot artist, known to be a stickler for gun safety, was driving his doorless car with his hammer shotgun loaded, its butt resting on the car's floorboard beside his feet, its barrel cradled in the crook of his arm. Driving cross-country the vehicle hit a bump and the shotgun's butt slid across the floorboard and out of the car, but as it did so one of the shotgun's hammers hit the edge of the floor. Hamman took the full shotgun blast at almost point-blank range, and the charge struck just beneath his ear. It was David Ommanney who transported Jacky's body back to Arusha where Jacky's widow, Betty, and his two young children lived.

Extract ID: 3837

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 211b
Extract Date: 1960~

Jackie Hamman

Hamman had always used his .577 rifle with deadly effect, despite his small physique, for he weighed only 110 pounds and stood a mere five foot two on tiptoes. At thirty years of age Jacky was the least imposing-looking of the white hunters. He had thinning fair hair and water-blue eyes, and his pale countenance was kept that way because, like Stan Lawrence-Brown, he always wore a wide-brimmed Borsalino hat.

Hamman was a Boer who had only learned to speak English during the Second World War, when he served in Abyssinia with a South African Armored Car Brigade. But his English was good despite his heavily clipped Afrikaans accent. Supremely confident in his own abilities, Hamman's favorite saying was that no animal was any match for an armed man.

Extract ID: 3831

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 212a
Extract Date: 1960~

south of Lake Manyara

Jacky gauged his clients carefully, and those he figured liked close encounters or who could stand up to the moment of truth without blinking he would take along when he went after wounded dangerous game. One client who witnessed Jacky's delight in close shaves was Peter Hirsch. Their hunting camp was south of Lake Manyara on a farm owned by a Greek named Marianakis. The Marianakis family hoped Hamman would help them get rid of elephant and buffalo that were tearing up their plantation. Late on the first evening, Hamman had seen hundreds of buffalo, but the next day they could not find any. There had been rain, and the grass was head-high. Hamman and his client hunted in the long grass, and as the men climbed a small knoll, Hirsch saw a buffalo bull standing on a little mound eyeing them.

Etc

Extract ID: 3832

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 212b
Extract Date: 1960~

Black Mamba

Hamman conducted a safari to his favorite place in central Tanganyika, known as the Yaida Valley. One morning Hamman and his client made a stalk on a big salt and pepper-maned lion. As the hunters crept forward a black mamba raised itself from the grass and struck Jacky in the thigh. Within seconds his leg ballooned to twice its normal size, turned beef red, and Jacky knew he was in bad trouble. He sat down, sending his gunbearer rushing back to the hunting car for his Fitzsirnmons snakebite serum. Meantime the trophy lion, which had been feeding on a kill, looked up. Seeing the hunters it bounded away. Jacky rigged a makeshift tourniquet with a belt in hopes of slowing the venom. When the gunbearer returned with the special mamba serum, Jacky injected himself twice, once into the snakebite, and once in the upper arm, hoping to get the serum into his heart before the venom got there. Miraculously Jacky survived the snakebite. He was very sick for a long time, and in town he relied on the advice of his friend Dr. George Six, whose wide-ranging interests included herpetology.

Extract ID: 3833
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