Myles Turner

Born 1921

Dies 27 March 1984

Myles was once a hunter, but became the first Game Warden of the Serengeti.

Name ID 632

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 013a
Extract Date: 1921

Myles Turner

Born, in northern England

Extract ID: 1034

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 013b
Extract Date: 1926

Myles Turner

Father settled in Kenya

Extract ID: 1035

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 130
Extract Date: 1947

my first job as a young Game Ranger

In 1947, my first job as a young Game Ranger was to placate the irate farmers of Nanyuki, who were bombarding the Game Department with telegrams about the hyenas that were nightly disembowelling their pedigree cattle.

Extract ID: 1036

See also

Heminway, John No Man's Land: The Last of White Africa
Page Number: 169
Extract Date: 1950's

Serengeti Shall Not Die

Alan's work with the Denises was interrupted one day by a zebra-striped Dornier aircraft that circled the Serengeti headquarters and landed next to the game warden's house. The plane was piloted by Bernhard and Michael Grzimek. a father-and-son team from Frankfurt. Germany. They wanted to record the movements of the herds of wildebeest and zebra over the course of a year, in hopes that the legal boundaries of the park would one day contain their migration. The first order of business was to hire a cameraman. Did the game warden happen to know one? Myles Turner, a man of fierce loyalties, made it clear that they could do no better than Alan Root, who happened to be filming nearby. Before Alan had even heard of the arrangement. Myles had successfully negotiated his contract.

The film they made with Alan was called ‘Serengeti Shall not die’. Of the few collaborations Alan has made, he can remember none so pleasant. He and Michael were much alike, not only in age. but in their approach to the game. They both were curious about the complex set of debts and promises that connect predators and prey: they both were consumed by the extravagance of life on these plains: and both of them were comics and daredevils.

The fun came to an end one day when Michael, flying alone, struck a vulture in midflight. With the ailerons and flaps jammed, the plane went into a dive. Michael was buried on the lip of the Ngorongoro Crater and the epitaph on his gravestone is simple: "Michael Grzimck - 11.4.1934 to 10.1.1959. He gave all he possessed for the wild animals of Africa, including his life."

Extract ID: 4156

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space
Extract Date: 1956

Turner, Myles . . . . went to Tanganyika . . .

Turner, Myles . . . . went to Tanganyika in 1956 to be Warden in charge of the Western Serengeti. It would be his third career, preceded by one as a game control officer in Kenya and another as a professional hunter.

Extract ID: 1038

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 01
Extract Date: 1956

Myles Turner

appointed Warden in Charge of Western Section of Serengeti, based at Banagi

Extract ID: 1037

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 015b
Extract Date: 1956

Myles Turner marries Kay

Extract ID: 1039

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 044
Extract Date: 1956 November

First Safaris from Banagi

I had just arrived at Banagi in November 1956 ....

One of my first safaris was to accompany the Professor [Pearsall] on his surveys in the Western Corridor. His safari was conducted by Don Ker, the well-known professional Hunter, and always one of the Serengeti’s most ardent supporters. Also on this safari were Hugh Elliott (later Sir Hugh), Dr. P.J Greenway the eminent East African botanical expert, and G.H. Swynnerton, Chief Game Warden of Tanganyika.

Extract ID: 1040

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 088
Extract Date: 1959

Myles Turner

as a result of these changes [resulting from the Committee of Enquiry] we moved to Seronera, the new headquarters of the Serengeti. After nearly three decades of use Banagi was virtually abandoned and allowed to fall into disrepair.

Extract ID: 1041

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 178
Extract Date: 1960

UMMO COMEVOI SARETA COME NO

I collected the man’s skull [a poacher killed and mutilated by a buffalo] which was miraculously undamaged, and put it up in my office at Seronera with the following inscription underneath:

‘This poacher was killed by a buffalo in the Tabora section.

UMMO COMEVOI SARETA COME NOI,’

which might be translated

‘We were once like you and you shall be like us.’

Extract ID: 1042

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 352
Extract Date: 1960

White Hunters (Africa) Ltd

Glen [Cottar] was sent to the Prince of Wales boarding school (in schoolboy slang the "Prince-O," but also known as the "Cabbage Patch" on account of a steady diet of that vegetable) back in Nairobi. His classmates included boys who would become white hunters - John Sutton, Dave Williams, John Dugmore, as well as future game wardens Brian Nicholson of the Tanganyika Game Department, Myles Turner of the Serengeti national park, and Peter Jenkins and Bill Woodley of Kenya national parks, along with Frank Poppleton of Uganda national parks.

Soon afterward Glen joined the new firm of White Hunters (Africa) Ltd., headed by David Lunan. At the time White Hunters was managed by Colonel Brett, formerly manager of Safariland Ltd. Brett left White Hunters (Africa) Ltd. under a cloud and was replaced by Colonel Robert Caulfield. In 1960, after Glen Cottar was fully licensed, he married vivacious Pat Schofleld, the daughter of English settlers from the Great Rift Valley town of Nakuru. Cottar, always an optimist, also made the big step of going it alone as an independent safari outfitter.

. . . . . .

Now Cottar had the freedom to take his safaris wherever he pleased, into distant and little-known country. He was the first hunter to penetrate the vast Moyowosi-Njingwe swamps in Tanzania on foot, long before the era of amphibious vehicles. He and his client came out of the swamps with a sitatunga antelope bearing record-class horns. The more remote and unknown a region happened to be, the greater its attraction for Glen Cottar. The time and expense of such explorations mattered little to Glen. He surveyed Tanzania's almost unknown Lukwati and Katavi areas, and cut many hundreds of miles of primitive tracks through featureless miombo woodlands. His rewards were the unspoiled landscape, unmarred by car tracks and, in many cases, even a human footprint. His clients reaped the benefits of these "reccies" by collecting outstanding trophies.

Extract ID: 3843

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Extract Author: Brian Jackman
Page Number: xviiia foreword
Extract Date: 1960

poacher’s skull

Myles brought back the poacher’s skull and it remained on view in his office, with the legend:

‘I have been where you are now,

And you will be where I have gone.’

Extract ID: 1043

See also

Allan, Tor Ndutu memories
Page Number: c
Extract Date: 1960’s

Removal of the Maasai

One day my father said, “We’re going down to remove the Masai from Moru Kopjes with Miles Turner and Gordon Pullman.” The villagers had been given notice to leave but were still there when the deadline date arrived. Serengeti had already become a National Park and was being extended to include more of the migration routes. If you look carefully at some of the big rocks at Moru, you’ll see where the manyattas were. On the leeward side of most big kopjes in the Moru area, there are remains of rather large circular stones and rocks which I believe are remains of the villages, unless they’re the remains of the Stone Bowl people before, or both.

I remember that day as hell and bloody fury – flames and smoke and dust, confusion, animals and people, shouting and shooting. The smoke and the burning – the horror of it all. The villages were torched and the dogs were shot. One dog was breathing through a great bleeding hole in its neck. The women and children were rounded up into trucks. Hundreds of cattle and other livestock were herded away by the young warriors and middle-aged men towards the east into part of Hidden Valley, past the springs at the eastern end and from there south east to the top end of Ndutu/Olduvai gorge, and down across the Lake Lagarja beaches. I know it was Lagarja because I remember seeing the flamingos. I think after that they were resettled in the Crater Highlands.

Extract ID: 5389

See also

Allan, Tor Ndutu memories
Page Number: d
Extract Date: 1960’s

East African Airways Sunday excursion package

I remember the two Bedford trucks they used. They were the ones used on the special East African Airways Sunday excursion package from Eastleigh Airport in Nairobi, bringing in weekenders for fun. The packages cost 180/- for the return DC3 flight, morning and afternoon game drives and lunch served by an EAA stewardess somewhere out in the bush. They arrived at about 8.30 in the morning and left Seronera at about 4.30. It was hugely popular. No problem with Customs and Immigration – we all just moved between the countries as we pleased then.

The tourists had their game drives in the Bedfords and one Land Rover, guided by my father, Gordon Pullman, Myles Turner or Gordon Harvey.

Extract ID: 5390

See also

Douglas-Hamilton, Iain and Oria Among the Elephants

Myles Turner

the Serengeti Park Warden

Extract ID: 1044

See also

1967 Publishes: Lamprey, Hugh and Turner, Myles Invasion of the Serengeti National Park by Elephants


Extract ID: 4421

See also

Douglas-Hamilton, Iain and Oria Among the Elephants

Myles Turner

Serengeti National Park Warden

Extract ID: 1045

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Extract Author: Brian Jackman
Page Number: xv foreword
Extract Date: 1967

Dr Hugh Lamprey, remembering Myles

Dr Hugh Lamprey, Director of the SRI from 1966 to 1972, remembers Myles from those days with affection and admiration, and the two men remained firm friends to the end. Some of the work carried out at the SRI required a number of animals to be shot for research - an idea that was anathema to Myles, who believed that all game in a National Park should be sacrosanct.

Myles was the man who saw the path of decency.’ says Lamprey. ‘He was the conscience of the Serengeti, and he hated to see it compromised in the name of science. ..... Myles never mixed freely with the scientists and this deprived him of the opportunity of reconciling the polarised views of the Wardens and the researchers on Parks management. On the whole he was prematurely dismissive of the work of the researcher.’

Extract ID: 1046

See also

Saitoti, Tepilit Ole The Worlds of a Maasai Warrior

After five months, Myles Turner, . . .

'After five months, Myles Turner, the ranger boss who drove the Land Rover field force one, discovered that I spoke English and Kiswahili and could help him to translate memoranda from the head office at Arusha or other government agencies. Although he was born and raised in Kenya and was a former hunter turned game warden, he spoke Kiswahili but could not write it, like most Kenyan cowboys. He spoke kitchen Kiswahili with an imperious attitude; he could say phrases such as kuja hapa (come here), wewe naseme nini? (what did you say?), na wewe mukora tu (you hoodlam), and his favourite kai ya Mungu (God's truth), a phrase many rangers liked him for. Such simplistic phrases were not very practical in the Tanzanian bureaucracy. Kiswahili is Tanzania's national language and the people speak it well.

I had to salute Myles Turner whenever he can into the office, as did all the rangers, and he loved it. He knew I did not like to, but I had to play the game. As long as I did, my resentment did not bother him a bit. ...

Myles Turner, like most colonial whites, respected the Maasai more than other Africans. Perhaps he found the blunt Maasai sincerity and of course bravery admirable. ...'

Extract ID: 1047

See also

Matthiessen, Peter The Tree Where Man Was Born
Extract Date: 1972

Myles’ Land Rover

Myles’ Land Rover was packed with gear of all descriptions and a truck carried tents for each of us and two tents for the staff, as well as stoves, stores and water. Like most British East Africans, Myles is extremely thorough in his safari preparations, and saw nothing strange at all at having seven pairs of hands to help him on a short trip of three days - what was strange to him was my discomfort. Not that I let it bother me for long. While the tents went up, I watched white clouds cross the black thunderhead behind Naisera lightening came, and a drum of rain on the hard ground across the valley. On the taut skin of Africa rain can be heard two miles away.

Extract ID: 3673

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space
Extract Date: 1972

swept along in the tide of Africanization

In 1972, swept along in the tide of Africanization, Miles Turner handed over charge of the Serengeti field force to a citizen warden

Extract ID: 1049

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 197
Extract Date: 1972

I relinquished command of the Serengeti Field Force

In early 1972 I relinquished command of the Serengeti Field Force, and handed over to a citizen Warden. For a few months more I stayed on in an advisory capacity before finally leaving for my new posting in the Arusha National Park. Since I left, 33 non-citizen Rangers and NCO’s of the Field Force have been replaced by citizens, leaving a gap in experience which will be hard to fill.

Extract ID: 1050

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 202a
Extract Date: 1972

Myles Turner

transferred to Arusha National Park

Extract ID: 1048

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 201e
Extract Date: 1972 April


tendered resignation to the Board of Trustees, but asked to serve for another two years in another Park.

Extract ID: 1051

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 209a
Extract Date: 1974

Myles Turner

Left Momella [and Tanzania], and moved to Kenya

Extract ID: 1052

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 209b
Extract Date: 1975

Myles Turner

moved to Nyika National Park, Malawi

Extract ID: 1053

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 220
Extract Date: 1982

Myles retires

When he reached the age of sixty, he was retired by the British Government, and we returned to our home in Kenya. ... and Myles was offered a job in the Masai Mara Game Reserve.

Extract ID: 1054

See also

Lindblad, Lisa and Sven-Olof The Serengeti; Land of Endless Space

Dies

Dies

Extract ID: 1055

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 221
Extract Date: 1984

Sadly, Myles died before this book was published.

Sadly, Myles died before this book was published. Myles was strong, wiry and tough to the end, and he knew nothing of the heart attack that killed him painlessly in his 63rd year....

A number of our favourite camp sites along the Mara River are visible from the square-topped hill on which his stone memorial is place, under a fig tree. The bronze plaque bears a simple inscription:

Myles Turner 1921 - 1984

In remembrance of a life dedicated to the wildlife of Africa

Extract ID: 1056

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: xiii foreword
Extract Date: 1984 March 27

sudden death of Myles Turner

The sudden and untimely death of Myles Turner in Kenya’s Masai Mara Game Reserve on 27 March 1984 deprived Africa of one of the legendary figures of wildlife conservation.

Extract ID: 1057

See also

1987 Publishes: Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years


Edited by Brian Jackman, after Myles' death

Extract ID: 356
www.nTZ.info