Seronera

Name ID 558

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 019b
Extract Date: 1920's

Leslie Simpson and Stewart Edward White reach Seronora

Leslie Simpson, an American hunter, reached Seronora from the north and returned five years later with Stewart Edward White and two other friends. Within three months they had shot fifty-one lions in the Seronera area.

Extract ID: 950

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 033c
Extract Date: 1925

Simpson and White .

In April and May 1925 Simpson brought Stewart Edward White and two friends along this route [to Seronera], and built a semi-permanent camp somewhere near the spot where the popular Seronera Wildlife Lodge now stands.

Extract ID: 1359

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 034a
Extract Date: 1926

Akeley Eastman safari

In 1926 A F (Pat) Ayre and Philip Percival, two great professional hunters, led the Akeley Eastman safari to Seronera. They brought twenty Lumbwa spearmen from Kenya and filmed the spearing of six lions.

Extract ID: 88

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 036
Extract Date: 1928

making his great film Simba

In 1928, Martin Johnson camped for three months in the Seronera area making his great film Simba.

Extract ID: 370

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 036
Extract Date: 1930's

The fame of the Serengeti lions

It was probably during the early 1930’s that the fame of the Serengeti lions began, due to the baiting and feeding of them by hunting parties. It is said in those days that one merely drove along the Seronera and the lions, hearing the cars, would follow, hoping for a meal. Sensational tricks were filmed, such as feeding lions in the back of trucks and filming through the rear window of the cab. One film company actually stuffed a human dummy with zebra meat and filmed a lion pulling the body from a tent.

Extract ID: 683

See also

Moore, Mrs Audrey Serengeti
Page Number: 42a
Extract Date: 1933

The Notice

One trick Monty Moore (Audrey's husband, and Warden at Banagi) used was to drag zebra carcasses behind lorries to feed the lion. This had the effect of taming the lions and having them rush vehicles looking for food.

Slight panic by unsuspecting tourists, and often a dead lion if the frightened visitors had guns. Hence the signs in the photos!!.

Extract ID: 3868

See also

Moore, Mrs Audrey Serengeti
Page Number: 42b
Extract Date: 1933

The Lion

Extract ID: 3869

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 055
Extract Date: 1933

Flying in the Serengeti begins

Flying in the Serengeti could be said to have begun with Martin and Osa Johnson, who took their Sikorsky amphibian planes up from Cape Town in 1933 and covered 60,000 miles of Africa. .... They landed at Seronera and spent two weeks photographing lions.

Extract ID: 371

See also

Cooke, J One White man in Black Africa
Page Number: 070

Peter Bramwall

Bramwall was a Kenyan, and had been at Banagi for about a year, during which time he had completed the first phase of the construction of what was to become the Seronera game lodge for tourists. This first stage consisted of only a few concrete rondavels, with thatched roofs, and a water collection system from a nearby rocky kopje.

Extract ID: 915

See also

Cooke, J One White man in Black Africa
Page Number: 070c
Extract Date: 1955

Cattle Census

I [John Cooke] was to be assisted [at a census of Masai cattle] by Peter Bramwall, who was game ranger at Banagi, and Peter Venter, a stock theft prevention officer from Arusha.

Bramwall was a Kenyan, and had been at Banagi for about a year, during which time he had completed the first phase of the construction of what was to become the Seronera game lodge for tourists. This first stage consisted of only a few concrete rondavels, with thatched roofs, and a water collection system from a nearby rocky kopje.

He was a trifle eccentric, and his method of travel across the Serengeti plains was, for example, highly original. The dust was atrocious, and Peter used to travel in a completely open landrover, clad only in an old army greatcoat. On arrival at his destination he simply removed this, shook it violently to detach much of the accumulated dust, and then got dressed in clean clothes.

Extract ID: 124

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 187
Extract Date: 1957

Excursion Flights

Visitors to the Serengeti were few until East African Airways began their excursion flights in late 1957. During the dry season two Dakotas from Nairobi would fly to Seronera every Sunday with about 40 people on board. They would be met and driven around the Serengeti for a day in the Serengeti's entire fleet of vehicles: two Land-Rovers and a 5-ton truck.

Extract ID: 917

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 039
Extract Date: 1959

Gordon Harvey

in 1959 a new house was built at Seronera for Gordon Harvey, our new Chief Park Warden, who had been living at Ngorongoro in charge of the Eastern Serengeti. Engaged by Parks a month before Myles, and senior in age, Gordon had had long experience of both administrative and field work during his years of government service. His artistic wife Edith, was the daughter of one of the first Europeans to settle in Kenya.

Extract ID: 314

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 088
Extract Date: 1959

Myles Turner

as a result of these changes [resulting from the Committee of Enquiry] we moved to Seronera, the new headquarters of the Serengeti. After nearly three decades of use Banagi was virtually abandoned and allowed to fall into disrepair.

Extract ID: 1041

See also

Huxley, Juliette Wild Lives of Africa
Extract Date: 1960

to the warden's house

[to Seronera] We drove on to the warden's house. Mrs. Harver [sic] received us, and took us straight to the guest-house for a welcome bath.

Extract ID: 315

See also

Allan, Tor Ndutu memories
Page Number: b
Extract Date: 1960’s

Three causeways

Another bit of trivia for you: Sid Downey, Donald Ker and Elizabeth Sanger each donated 2,000/- for the construction of three causeways across the Seronera River to allow visitors access into and out of Park HQ at Seronera. That was a huge amount of money then. Anyway, back to my story…….

Extract ID: 5388

See also

Huxley, Elspeth Forks and Hope
Extract Date: 1961

Managi or Banagi

Money subscribed by his [Michael Grzimek] many friends to a memorial fund was spent on a small research laboratory at Managi [sic], near Seronera on the Serengeti. Six biologists are at work there under the direction of a distinguished Belgian, Dr. Jacques Verschuren, until recently chief biologist to the Parc National Albert in the Congo.

Extract ID: 1077

See also

Allan, Tor Ndutu memories
Page Number: e
Extract Date: 1961

Duke of Edinburgh’s visit to Seronera

In the middle of December 1961, in preparation for the Duke of Edinburgh’s visit to Seronera after the Independence Day celebrations in Dar Es Salaam, my father and I went out towards Banagi where dad shot six topi, one of which was immediately set upon by lion. We had to drive up to them in the little Land Rover to get them off the carcass.

We took the topi back to Seronera that afternoon and spending what was left of the day and early next morning before the Duke arrived, locating three or four different prides of lion. Each pride was fed with a dead topi, ready for the Royal game drive.

Needless to say, the lion had eaten topi that morning and by the time the Duke arrived they were fast asleep – but at least they were easily found. On departure from Seronera the Duke’s aircraft of the Queen’s Flight got stuck on the airfield after a lot of rain. We had to use Tanganyika jacks to raise it so that we could put kindling and stones under the wheels – hasn’t changed much has it – just busier.

Extract ID: 5391

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 180
Extract Date: 1961, November

rain

In November, thirteen inches of rain fell on Seronera, and floods rose all over the Serengeti. ... the floods continued well into the following year.

Extract ID: 1349

See also

Douglas-Hamilton, Iain and Oria Among the Elephants

Seronera

Park HQ and Rest Houses

Extract ID: 937

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 214
Extract Date: 1964-1967

Sandy Field - and the hessian suit

Sandy Field, Chief Park Warden in the Serengeti from 1964 to 1967, once saw a lorry arrive from Arusha loaded with furniture covered with hessian and conceived the idea of having a suit made out of it. The Seronera tailor was commissioned and, after three fittings, the suit was completed at a cost of 25 shillings. The tailor threw in a hessian tie for good measure. Sandy used to wear the suit occasionally, looking quite extraordinary and purple with heat.

Extract ID: 1292

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 157,163
Extract Date: 1966

On the value of research

Finally in 1966 a large and expensive Research Institute costing over $600,000 to build was established four miles from Seronera, with a laboratory and housing for a director, deputy director, ecologist and up to twenty research scientists. The balance between management and research had finally been upset in no uncertain manner.

The arrogance of these scientists - with the ink hardly dry on their graduation papers - was unbelievable. I once heard them described at a Research meeting, chaired by a very eminent visiting Oxford professor, as ‘these brilliant young men at the height of their creative powers’! They obviously believed in this assessment and were sublimely confident that they had the answers to all East Africa’s game problems.

[Myles then goes on to describe how the scientists gradually increased the number of animals that they were killing as part of their experiments, until, partly following a visit by Martha Gellhorn, the policy was reviewed.]

Out of many hundreds of thousand of dollars spent on research in East Africa during the ‘fashionable’ decade of the 1960s, little if anything has been achieved to my knowledge. Far better if the money was spent on anti-poaching and education. How much was spent on research in East Africa during those heady years? I have heard the figure of $10,000,000 quoted by a man in a position to know. He may be right. One thing is sure: it was a great confidence trick, and virtually nothing has ever come out of it to help the hard-pressed animals of East Africa.

Extract ID: 1337

See also

Nyamweru, Celia Oldoinyo Lengai Web Site
Page Number: 14
Extract Date: August 1966

Major Acticity

During the climb on 21st August, the lower slopes were covered with about half an inch of new, snow white ash which reached a thickness of about 2 inches closer to the summit. The active crater was full of swirling ash and dust. In it was a new ash cone in whose summit was a shallow bowl-shaped pit about 100 yards in diameter. In the centre of this pit was a small double vent from which there was a continuous discharge of gas and whitish-grey ash and dust. There was a continuous roaring noise and a strong smell of sulphur. Ash was scattered all over most of the inside of the crater and there was about 6 inches of new black ash on the outer slopes of the east rim. The crater was observed from 10.30 a.m. to 1.50 p.m., during which period no lava extrusion was seen, and the ejected material was not larger than ash size.

The photograph [see web site] (taken by Gordon Davies) shows the active crater in August 1966.

At 2.45 p.m. on 21st August there was a violent harsh explosion and a dense column of black ash rose vertically above the crater. A series of loud explosions occurred at intervals of less than 15 seconds, each one accompanied by the expulsion of more ash. This continued until about 4.0 p.m., when the explosions ceased, though the ejection of ash continued all that day and throughout the night.

At 11.30 a.m. on 22nd August, when these observations ended, the pine-tree shaped cloud of a Plinian-type eruption was towering above the volcano.

On the morning of 23rd August activity had almost ceased; only a small amount of ash was rising to a few hundred feet above the volcano. The ash cone within the northern crater had grown higher.

On 1st September another violent ash eruption was reported.

On 3rd and 4th September activity continued; a column of ash rose above the volcano and drifted away to the north. The summit crater was almost infilled with ash, though there was still a deep pit in its centre. On 11th October the volcano was still active; the local Maasai pastoralists and the wild game animals had moved out of the area, probably because the water and grazing supplies were contaminated by the ash. The photograph [see web site] , taken by Joan Westenberg in August 1966, shows the thickness of ash on the lower slopes of the volcano.

Ash fall was reported as far as Seronera (130 km west), Loliondo (70 km north-west) and Shombole (70 km north).

On 28th October the volcano was seen to be covered with white ash, and was still active, with a light plume of ash blowing away to the north-west.

Observations in late December 1966 and on 1st January 1967 established that there was no activity.

A major explosive eruption was reported on 8 - 9th July 1967. Ash fell at Arusha (110 km southeast) and at Wilson Aerodrome in Nairobi, 190 km to the northeast. After this the volcano seems to have remained dormant for several years. Click here to see what happened in 1983.

Extract ID: 4512

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 120
Extract Date: 1968

the Director decided that something more palatial was needed

In 1968 the Director decided that something more palatial was needed to accommodate the heavy inflow of VIP’s visiting the Park. A well-known firm of Nairobi architects was given the job of designing it with no expense spared. The was to be the guest house to end all guest houses - a superb new Taj Mahal. It stands today near the old Taj and every effort was made by Les Talbot, the best construction engineer the Parks ever had, to make it perfect.

Extract ID: 1331

See also

Turner, Kay Serengeti Home
Page Number: 093
Extract Date: 1972

Seronera Lodge

a modern hotel that catered for 150 guests neared completion, and the conversion of the old Seronera Lodge into staff quarters had already begun.

Extract ID: 938

See also

Fletcher, Colin The Winds of Mara
Page Number: 156
Extract Date: 1972

Here the world is still

Then I drove south across the border, past a big black billboard that stood beside the track:

TANZANIA NATIONAL PARKS

HERE THE WORLD IS STILL

YOUNG AND FRAGILE

HELD IN TRUST

FOR YOUR SONS AND OURS

About eighty miles further on I came to a place known as Seronera, site of a tourist lodge and headquarters of Serengeti National Park. It was also headquarters of the Serengeti Research Institute.

Extract ID: 3572

See also

Fletcher, Colin The Winds of Mara
Page Number: 157
Extract Date: 1972

at the Serengeti Research Institute

...... the Serengeti Research Institute, the direct descendent of the Grzimek's pioneering effort, is one of the biggest and best known organisations coordinating the work of such researchers.

I arrived at Seronera in midafternoon, and next morning I saw Dr. Hugh Lamprey, director of the Institute. He could not, he said, speak for individual researchers - they worked independently and each would have to answer for himself - but he wouldcertainly do all he could to help.

.... We discussed grass management by deliberate burning. The value of burning, said Lamprey, was still an open question. New grass, which on the savanna sprouted within twentyfour or thirtysix hours of a rain shower, came up far stronger on burned land. Burning also kept gall acacia and other bush under control. But if done too often it impoverished the soil. Most people seemed to accept that. They did not agree on much else.

Lamprey smiled. "We held a grass management conference here just the other day. Experst from all over the world. But we couldn't get even two of them to agree on the best burning practices. The trouble is, nobody really knows." Burning, said Lamprey, was just the question the Institute had to tackle: its job was to pin down at least some of the basic facts..

Extract ID: 3573

See also

Iwago, Mitsuaki Serengeti: Natural Order on the African Plain
Extract Date: 1982-1984

I lived in the park for a year

I lived in the park for a year and a half, from August 1982 to March 1984. ... With my wife and four-year-old daughter, I rented a small house in a village called Seronera, located in the centre of the park. Its population consists of six hundred Tanzanians who are rangers in the park or employees of the tourist lodges.

Extract ID: 353

external link

See also

Claytor, Tom Bushpilot
Extract Author: Tom Claytor
Page Number: 19b
Extract Date: 1996 08 Jul

visiting Baron Hugo van Lawick

I land at lake Ndutu to visit Baron Hugo van Lawick. I first met Hugo when I was working on a film called 'Serengeti Dairy' for National Geographic. The film was a celebration of his 25th year living and filming wildlife in the Serengeti, and I was part of the crew that tried to capture this place from the air. I park the plane in an empty cage designed to keep the hyenas and lions from chewing the tires, and soon a vehicle arrives to collect me. When I arrive in camp, Hugo comes out to greet me. He is in a wheelchair, and we sit by his tent looking out over the lake and drinking tea.

The nice thing about this part of the world is that traveling is so difficult that one does not usually get a lot of visitors. A visitor brings news from the outside world, and this is something that one can yearn for. Hugo first came to Africa in 1959, because he wanted to film animals. He came for two years, and he never left. He made lecture films for Louis Leakey and at age 24 shot the photographs for the articles on the Leakey's work in Africa. He was married to Jane Goodall for 10 years, and he has spent most of his life observing and recording wildlife through a lens. He is having trouble breathing with his emphysema now, but he wastes no time in filling me in on what has been happening. It seems all the wild dogs have all been exterminated by rabies brought in by the Maasai dogs; the lion numbers are down due to feline distemper, and so the cheetah numbers are up. The bat-eared foxes have been hit by rabies, and the poaching is still bad on the western boundary. According to Hugo, some people there have never tasted cow meat, only wild game meat. There are snares everywhere along that boundary, and the park used to feel very big when there weren't so many tourists. Hugo relays all this news as one might talk about the traffic jams on the way to work, and I have to quietly smile as I listen.

He then tells me about the pilot Bill Stedman who crashed his motor glider while coming in to land here last year. He was working on Hugo's film 'The Leopard Sun'; the plane just dropped out of the sky, and Bill was dead. We both pause and looked out across the lake. I ask Hugo if he remembers when we landed on that lake and built a fire on the edge as part of our 'camping scene' for the film. He remembers and chuckles about this. I was arrested shortly after that back in Seronera by armed scouts. They took me to the park warden's office, but I had no idea why. I was asked what I had done the previous day, and I explained that we had been filming by the lake and had landed on its edge. A little man confirmed that I had landed on the edge of the lake, and then I was released because I had told the truth. I was still a little confused by all this. I was told that they were going to 'compound' me and the plane, but that since I had told the truth, I would now only have to pay a fine. I shuddered to think what this fine would be, but it was only 1,500 Tanzanian Shillings (about $3).

Extract ID: 3657

external link

See also

Claytor, Tom Bushpilot
Extract Author: Tom Claytor
Page Number: 19e
Extract Date: 1996 08 Jul

Sarah cheetah

I leave Hugo and fly north to Seronera. This is the location of the park headquarters and the research camp. Everyone in the research camp seems to have a nickname relating to what they are researching or doing. There is 'John wildebeest', 'Jane of the Serengeti', 'Tracy balloon', 'Sarah cheetah', 'Sarah rabies', 'Sarah simba', and 'the hyenas'.

Sarah Durant has been here for five years researching cheetahs. Her project is a long range one which involves tracking known individuals by spots and markings. The mortality, birth rate, and different aspects of cheetah behavior are recorded to predict how the population will behave and how the cheetahs fit into the ecosystem. Sarah uses a sound system to play back lion and hyena sounds to cheetahs in order to record their reaction. Sarah has observed that the most successful cheetah mothers are the ones who move the farthest from the lion calls. We travel out into the plains and set up the equipment near some cheetahs. When the lion sound is played, the female cheetah looks up and analyzes the sound. It then usually takes her about 15 minutes to then get up and move from 500 meters to one kilometer away. Sarah takes a lot of time recording the smallest details of behavior in her notebook and the times that they occur. It almost seems to be over-analyzing their behavior to me until she explains that only 5% of young cheetah cubs reach maturity due to predation by lion and hyena, so the little details matter. Sarah plays hyena 'whooping' sounds through her speaker. This is a contact call which they make as they are moving around. The 'giggling sound' they make only when they are on a kill. However, neither of these sounds seem to disturb the cheetahs as much as the lion calls. The furthest distance that Sarah has been able to locate a cheetah is 7.5 kilometers. She has to find them with binoculars first, then she can follow and observe them. 90% of the cheetah's diet is Thompson's Gazelle, so most often, you will find them perched up on an old termite mound surveying the horizon. Sarah tells me that she wants to find out what is best for the cheetah in the long term. 'You don't want to encourage them being pets. This is what wiped them out in Asia; the Maharajas used them for hunting.'

Sarah tells me that the Tanzanians have no concept that tourists should get something for their money when they come here. 'Just look at the menu and how much you have to pay to stay in the lodges here,' she says with a smile, and yet, this is also what Sarah likes the most about this place - that it just doesn't matter. 'I think people need something beautiful in their lives and wilderness is beautiful - like art and culture. This is why this place is important,' she says. When you sit out in the wilderness all day looking at nature all around you, you begin to realize this. She tells me that Coco Chanel once said, 'Nature gives you the face you have at 20, but it is up to you to merit the face you have at 50.' We all earn our face.

Extract ID: 3660

external link

See also

Claytor, Tom Bushpilot
Extract Author: Tom Claytor
Page Number: 19f
Extract Date: 1996 08 Jul

Ballooning

Long before the sun rises, Tracy Robb and I have left camp to prepare her balloon. The clients arrive and we are airborne drifting across the Serengeti. From up here, the Serengeti comes alive. It is covered with animals. On the ground, the wind is from the south, and as we increase in altitude the wind comes from the east. The higher we go the more we turn to the left. This is how she steers. In the northern hemisphere it is the opposite; you will turn to the right with height. Tracy is from South Africa, and ballooning is her passion. I find my eyes are fixed to the ground as we drift along. The wildlife below is looking up at us, not knowing whether to watch or run as we pass.

Back on the ground, I am starting to notice that there are more female researchers than male researchers here. I feel a little bit like a Thompson's gazelle surrounded by cheetahs, and I am not sure that I am very comfortable about it. This surprises me, because I would have imagined that I wouldn't mind the attention, but this is different. I think males naturally like to hunt their prey or their mates, but they aren't so keen to have it the other way around. I find myself trying to avoid places and situations where I might be hunted. This is certainly a new experience for me, and I soon find security with John wildebeest.

John tells me that before the Drought of 1993, there were 1.6 million wildebeest. Now, there are .9 million. There are a quarter million zebra and a half million Thompson's gazelle. John conducts his research by putting grass on a one meter square platform sled and dragging it up to a group of gazelle. He doesn't stop his vehicle, so as not to frighten the gazelle, but he releases the sled. The idea is that the gazelle will then come up and feed off the sled. He can then compare the weight of the grass before and after they have fed. So far this hasn't worked, because the gazelle haven't fed of the platform, but John remains optimistic.

Late in the afternoon, I sit east of Seronera and watch the sun set over the horizon. After the sun goes down, the sky turns a brilliant red as the sun shines up on the base of the clouds. Normally, the sun sets quite quickly along the equator, but this red glow continues for a full 15 minutes as the surrounding darkness envelopes me. This is taking far too long. I study this until I become convinced that I have made a great discovery. The sun must surely be reflecting off of Lake Victoria like a mirror and bouncing back up into the sky. I cannot imagine any other explanation for what I am seeing, but unfortunately no one thinks this is possible.

Extract ID: 3661

external link

See also

Abercrombie and Kent
Extract Author: Alistarir Ballantine
Extract Date: 1999 September 1

Statement regarding Tanzania Incident

www.abercrombiekent.com.

An aircraft chartered by Abercrombie & Kent Tanzania from Northern Air is missing. The aircraft carrying ten American tourists on an Abercrombie & Kent Livingstone Safari took off from Seronera Airstrip in the Serengeti at around 10:20 am (Tanzania time) 3:20 am (EDT) on Wednesday, September 1, and has not been heard from since. An extensive search is under way. *

We have been informed that the aircraft was a twin-engine Cessna 404. It was being flown by Chris Pereira, Chief Pilot of Northern Air. The clients on this aircraft were part of the Abercrombie & Kent Livingstone Safari, which departed August 22nd from the United States.

Additional, information will be posted to the website as it becomes available.

For further information, contact: The Africa Desk of the U.S. State Department in Washington, or Gillian Larkin, Sr. VP, at the Abercrombie & Kent Offices in Oak Brook, Illinois, on 1-800-323-7308 or 1-630-954-2944. Or visit our website a www.abercrombiekent.com.

* Update at 2:00 pm - Oak Brook, Illinois Time

An aircraft, which is believed to be the aircraft in question, has been seen on Mt. Meru and the search-and-rescue efforts are now all focused on reaching this aircraft.

** Update at 4:00 pm - Oak Brook, Illinois Time

The search-and-rescue team have located the crash site. As best as they are able, given the fact it is difficult terrain and dark, they have not been able to locate any survivors at this time. This search party will camp at the site, waiting for day break. With daybreak a helicopter will return to the site, hoping to land near the crash site in order to thoroughly search the area and confirm whether there are (or are not) any survivors. A Flying Doctor and Nurse are among the search-and-rescue team to enable giving any survivors immediate medical attention.

*** Update on September 2nd at 10:30 am - Oak Brook, Illinois Time

The aircraft and the bodies of ten passengers, together with the pilot and the A & K Professional Guide have been found. There are no survivors. The bodies will be moved, first to Arusha, and then to Nairobi, where they will be prepared for repatriation. This will be handled by the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi. The State Department has informed all next of kin and will only release the names of the deceased when they are ready to do so.

The twin-engine Cessna 404 was owned by Northern Air, which has seven aircraft. The Cessna 404 was licensed to carry up to 14 passengers and was being flown by Northern Air's Chief Pilot, Chris Pereira. Mr. Pereira had over twenty years and 16,000 flying hours of experience. The aircraft left the Serengeti shortly after 10:00 am Tanzania time and crashed into the side of Mt. Meru at about 9,000 feet above sea level. The weather was overcast, which is fairly typical around Mt. Meru at this time of the year and there was nothing unusual about the weather.

The Professional Guide leading the group, William Meiliani, was also killed. The remaining 7 clients on this Livingstone Safari Group went on to Nairobi and the Masai Mara, continuing their safari.

We are deeply saddened by this tragic accident.

Feb 2003 - The specific page giving this information is no longer available on line

Extract ID: 1397

See also

Turner, Myles My Serengeti Years
Page Number: 033b

Seronera

The name Seronera is probably derived from the Masai word siron Meaning a bat-eared fox. Thus Seronera is 'the place of the bat-eared foxes'

Extract ID: 1355
www.nTZ.info