Bishop Chambers

Name ID 1410

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 18

b. THE VISION OF BISHOP CHAMBERS:

The Church Missionary Society from U.K. was one of the first missionary bodies in East Africa and it was Krapf and Rebman from its ranks who first sighted Kilimanjaro in 1859. Based on Mombasa, they established before 1900 a chain of mission stations in Kenya and inland Tanganyika while the Universities Mission to Central Africa undertook Anglican missionary work along the Tanganyika coast and on Zanzibar. In 1927, the Diocese of Central Tanganyika was carved out of the Mombasa Diocese as an independent entity.

The Church Missionary Society of Australia was given responsibility for this new sprawling Diocese. George William Chambers was consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury and appointed to take over existing C.M.S. work in the area and spearhead a new Anglican initiative for mission work in what was actually the whole of Tanganyika away from the coast and southern highlands.

En route from Australia to his consecration, Chambers toured his new Diocese and was impressed by the complete lack of pastoral or chaplaincy provision for the Europeans and the inadequacy of education for their children. His biographer quotes him saying in 1928

“… there was a feeling abroad that the church cared only for the African. One European who had. lost his wife was forced to lock up his young daughter in the house all day while he went to work. Another said, ‘You look after the Africans but don't care a jot for us Europeans’”.

The Bishop was in fact most anxious to provide for European children, and when he was in Moshi, he conferred with the Director of Education. It was decided to recommend. to the Government that a school for European children be established at a cost of £15,000 of which the Diocese would be obliged to find half.

In fulfilment of this need, Chambers did three things. Firstly he raised funds in. U.K. for church buildings for the Europeans at Morogoro, Tabora, Kigoma, Bukoba, Arusha, Moshi and Mwanza. He also began to recruit chaplains from the U.K. for these churches. Thirdly he recruited from Australia a young couple, Mr. and Mrs. I. Boothe, who came to Tanganyika with him in 1928 to establish the first boarding school for Europeans.

Extract ID: 4925

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 19
Extract Date: 1928-32

c. THE NGARE NAIROBI SCHOOL:

Chambers arrived with 17 new recruits and at a conference in November 1928 the following was recorded: "The conference recommends to the Executive committee that a European school be opened immediately at Ngare Nairobi near Moshi in Mr, Geyer's house by Mr. and Mrs. Boothe, on the condition that, the Government pays the rent of £5 per month, and makes a grant of £50 toward necessary improvements, and that an application be made for a boarding grant for each European child in residence at this school. "

This was a very unspectacular and tentative beginning, but it was a beginning. There were in 1929 19 children living in rough and temporarily converted farm buildings; the area was remote and difficult of access; there was a problem of water supply and at night lions could be heard drinking such water as there was; the Headmaster was issued with a game licence so that he could shoot the school's meat supply and Boothe and his wife were in fact the only staff.

There were other problems too. Some of the fees were not paid., the settlers were unable to finance the scheme on their own and the mission was not prepared to underwrite it from its scanty resources for African work. Boothe apparently proved to be an unsatisfactory person who was unhappy living in such isolation, discontented with his personal allowance, critical of the Bishop and involved heavily in debt, both personally and in the school's finances.

This foray into non-African work was obviously not a success and after one year, the mission withdrew altogether from the school and re-allocated Boothe to a training college for native pastors. Boothe tried to transfer to the Government teaching service in September 1929, but was not accepted. He then resigned from the mission and was employed by the West Kilimanjaro Planters Association who took over the school in. January 1930.

This scheme of management did not work either, and in September 1930 the settlers appealed to the Governor who assumed direct control of the school. Boothe was then employed by the Government on a month to month basis until August 1932 when he was given 8 days notice of retrenchment and repatriated to U.K.

This first attempt had been unsuccessful and had left both the Government and the Mission in an embarrassing position. The school struggled on with men called Stowell and Feelie as Headmasters between 1931 and 1933. It is not clear from the records just when Boothe left the school or whether the other two men had successive or joint responsibility. (See Appendix N.)

Extract ID: 4926

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 20

d. A NEW INITIATIVE - ARUSHA SCHOOL:

A mission conference in 1929 expressed the hope that the Government of Tanganyika will adopt the same policy of cooperation with Missions with regard to European education as it does in regard to African education.

Various consultations were going on as to the need, type and best place for a now school. In 1931, there were 58 European children. in Northern Tanganyika receiving no schooling beyond private tuition at home, and the annual report stated the Government 's intention to build a new European school at Arusha in the Northern Province. In order to work this school as economically as possible, it was hoped to complete an arrangement with the Bishop of Central Tanganyika under which he would conduct the school as an agent for the Government. The staff appointed would be subject to the approval of the Government and. the working and management of the school would be under Government inspection.

It is apparent that after the abortive attempt in 1928, and with the stringency of the depression, plans were much more carefully laid. It was not until 1932 that the Governor, Sir Stewart Symes approached Bishop Chambers with a definite offer to build a “first class and modern school and equip it”, if the Bishop would find the staff and manage it .

There is no doubt that this “new era of cooperation” between church and state was partly motivated by the shortage of Government funds; the mission teachers were paid approximately one fifth of the government rate.

The Headmaster Wynn Jones saw it more positively. He wrote, “The efficiency, finance and stability of a Government school has so often lacked the personal element and spiritual contact which is so necessary a part of all true education”. The Bishop wrote in a quarterly letter, “It is essential that we should give Christian education to European children in this territory for they will be the future leaders. The white man cannot help being a leader here. The African imitates him in all he does and if we can inculcate the ideals of Christ in the lives of our white children, then Christian civilization is much more likely to come to this land”. The Greek community promised support and the Bishop continued, “I hope the school will be a little commonwealth of nations including German, Dutch, and Greek children. If the boys and girls of these various communities learn to live, work and play together in school life, they will all the better be able to inform a united community in the future, having the welfare of all at heart and the spirit of esprit d'corps a reality among them!”

The Bishop also hoped that the school would bring the church into contact with Europeans in the territory and hopefully win sympathy from them in missionary work.

So at the request of the Government, Rev. William Wynn Jones was seconded from the mission, sent on early overseas leave and, having newly married, he moved in 1933 to the Ngare Nairobi school to prepare the nucleus there for the move to Arusha. Miss Martha Vance a missionary nurse was also sent on early leave, to return as Matron.

On 22nd May 1934, with Miss Vance as matron and Wynn Jones as Headmaster, the Arusha School opened in its “palatial buildings”. It had been designed for 48 boarders, 24 girls and 24 boys, and 30 day pupils. It opened with 33 boarders, and by the end of the year the enrolment had risen to 41 plus 6 day pupils. (See Appendix F.)

Extract ID: 4927

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See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 47
Extract Date: 26 Jan 1933

APPENDIX A AGREEMENT 26TH JANUARY 1933

(for full details of this section click on the link on the right, and search for the appropriate page.)

AN AGREEMENT made the 26th day of January 1933 between Douglas James Jardine, Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Chief Secretary to the Government of Tanganyika (hereinafter referred to as the "Government" which expression shall include the person for the time being holding or acting in the office of Chief Secretary) for and on behalf of the Government aforesaid of the one part and GEORGE ALEXANDER Chambers D.D., Bishop of Central Tanganyika, acting on behalf of the Diocese of Central Tanganyika (hereinafter referred to as the "Diocese") of the other part -

Extract ID: 4948

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See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 51
Extract Date: 19 Nov 1936

APPENDIX B AGREEMENT 19TH NOVEMBER 1936

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AN AGREEMENT made the nineteenth day of November 1936, between HENRY CHARLES DONALD CLEVELAND Mackenzie-Kennedy, Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Chief Secretary to the Government of Tanganyika (hereinafter referred to as the "Government" which expression shall include the person for the time being holding or acting in the office of Chief Secretary) for and on behalf, of the Government aforesaid of the one part and GEORGE ALEXANDER Chambers, D.D., Bishop of Central Tanganyika, acting on behalf of the Diocese of Central Tanganyika (hereinafter referred to as the "Diocese") of -the other part:

SUPPLEMENTAL to an agreement made the twenty sixth day of January, 1933 (hereinafter referred to as the "principal agreement") between the parties hereto.

Extract ID: 4949

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See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 57
Extract Date: 15 Jan 1947

APPENDIX C AGREEMENT 15TH JANUARY 1947

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AN AGREEMENT made the 15th. day of January 1947 BETWEEN Ernest Rex Edward Surridge, Companion of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Chief Secretary to the Government of Tanganyika (hereinafter referred to as the "Government" which expression shall include the person for the time being holding or acting in the office of Chief Secretary) for and on behalf of the Government aforesaid of the one part and George Alexander Chambers, Bishop of Central Tanganyika, acting on behalf of the Diocese of Central Tanganyika. (hereinafter referred to as the "Diocese") of the other part

Extract ID: 4950

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 38

e. AN ENRICHING SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT:

While Hamshere found day pupils an annoying appendage to the school, it must be said to his credit that he provided for the boarders a rich and stimulating environment. It is worth listing here briefly the significant extra-curricular activities which feature in the school records.

In the very first years of the school, Wynn Jones organised students to level the playing fields and as soil was removed to top-dress them, a 15 metre swimming pool was dug. Swimming; became an important sport and recreational activity, and both a swimming gala and swimming sports day involving former pupils were held annually.

An important annual event in which Hamshere himself always took the lead was the climb of Mt. Meru (14,979') near Arusha. Some 12 to 20 trained and physically fit children made the climb and an attractive certificate was presented to those who “conquered”.

A school sports day was held each year, usually in the presence of some distinguished quest such as the Governor and Lady Twining in 1955.There was also an inter school sports day against the Greek and Dutch schools, but no competitive sports with African schools.

Carols by Candlelight, begun by the music mistress in 1947,,became a significant even for Arusha town.

A Christmas play preceded the annual Speech Day at which the Warden or his deputy presented the prizes.

A proliferation of cups and shields, was accumulated from old students members of the School Council. These included

the Wynn Jones memorial scripture prizes,

the Rasharasha prizes for “dependability, helpfulness and behaviour”,

the Ann Revington Cup for the best all round girl and

the Du Toit cup for the best all round boy;

there was a Selian cup for physical culture,

an Ann Hazel Cup for swimming.

House Shields for swimming and athletics carved by a blind African wood carver and house trophies for rounders, hockey diving, football, rugby, netball and cricket.

There were inter school visits and sports matches with Nairobi School and Mombasa Primary School.

An annual school magazine was published from 1955 to 1965, and

there were troops of Guides, Brownies and Scouts.

From fund raising within the school, horses were purchased in 1954 and 2 tennis courts built in 1958.

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the founding of the school in 1959, a bronze plaque noting the association of the school with the Diocese was unveiled in Christ Church Arusha, a special thanksgiving service was held, and £2,000 was collected for a Silver Jubilee Library. Bishop Chambers, whose foresight in 1927 had set plans in motion for the school, came at the age of 83 to open the library.

In 1943 the school was the venue for a conference of translators of the Bible into Swahili;

in 1947 delegates to the Pan African pre-history congress were accommodated in the school;

in 1950 Lady Baden Powell the Chief Guide, and later that year Lord Rowallen, the Chief Scout, visited the school;

in 1956 Princess Margaret spent 15 minutes with. the pupils in the school hall while the Hellenic and Dutch schools were allowed to line the drive! A cupboard full of Union Jacks, kept firmly locked in these post Independence days, remains as memento of the occasion.

In 1961 a conference on the preservation of wild life was held at the school and included such distinguished guests as Sir Julian Huxley, Peter Scott, Professor Monet, Armand and Michaela Dennis and Dr. Grzimek.

In 1969 the Presidents of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania met in the school to establish the East African Community.

In spite of the rapid turnover of teachers, matrons and some pupils, a strong school spirit and tradition was established. This was contributed to materially by the continuity of the School Council and of senior staff members as exemplified by

the Headmaster 1946 - 1964,

Miss I. Brown, Senior Mistress 1949 - 61,

Mrs. Fischer, Senior Matron 1950 - 59,

Mr. R. Johnson 1952 - 59,

Mr. H. Jones, Second Master 1953 - 61,

Rev. B. Jones Chaplain and from 1963 Headmaster, 1954 - 69, and

Mr. J. Hazel 1956 - 63.

Such continuity, even if for only a small proportion of the staff, was most unusual for the Colonial Service. The Department of Education, the statistics for which are not reflected in the above staff sample, could say in 1957, “there is a high rate of turnover of staff and delays in recruitment and by the end of the year, there was not one mistress who had been them 3 years previously”

Extract ID: 4942
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