Bryn Jones

Name ID 1636

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Mark Morgan Mark Morgan
Page Number: 2004 02 21
Extract Date: 1947-1955

Bill Morgan was a master at the school

I have just come across this interesting site, while gathering information for a return visit to Arusha later in the Year.

I was very pleased to read the history of Arusha School as my farther, Bill Morgan was a master at the school from about 1947-1955 (I think those dates are right) He was teaching there before the war and then returned after.

I have three brothers we where all born in Arusha and later moved with dad when he went to Oyester-Bay School in Dar, and then later to Mbeya. My elder brother was then a boarder at Arusha before we all where sent to school in the uk.

It was good to see photos of Bryn Jones,a great family friend ( he was kind enough to marry both my self and both of my brothers) he sadly died several years ago, but my mother still keep in contact with his widow.

Seeing the photo of the late Princess Margaret's visit to the school. I was actually in the photo( the top of my head) we have a copy in the family album, and the photo of my farther being presented had pride of place on my grandmothers T.V

We have many photos of the school, and activites going on, which you would be quite welcome to to put on the site.

I am looking forward to my visit in September but hope that the School and Town have not changed to much, but it is nearly 50 years since I was last there.

Will give the site address to my brothers so they can have a look

Mark Morgan

Thanks for your feedback and interesting email. Sorry for the delay in replying.

I received, at about the same time, an email from Andrew Hannah, at the school from 1957-60, although he had brothers there before him, and he lists Morgan as one of the teachers he remembers. I’ll put his, and your, emails up on the web site at the next update.

I think I was just out of the shot of Princess M - my duty was to hold the door open for her as she came in. I’ve got lots of other stuff about her visit, which I haven’t yet had time to publish on the site.

But if you have photos and other anecdotes, I’d welcome copies for inclusion.

You will greatly enjoy revisiting Arusha. It’s changed much in the last ten years or so since I’ve been going back. From being a shabby backwater, it’s now a vibrant small town, and slowly cleaning itself up. However, flying over it can be horrific in that it reveals a huge shanty town, just as poor as any slum in Nairobi or Johannesburg, but totally hidden from the main tourist throughways.

I called in on the school last May, and found one teacher very happy to show me round (and the tortoise is still there). The buildings are nearly all the same. The roofs have reverted from tiles to bati sheets. The dining hall still has the same long tables and sideboards, and the trophy boards on the wall. But whereas there were less then 300 pupils in the 50’s there are now 1200.

The headmaster was very busy, but pleased to see me (I think).

Do tell me more about your trip - have you allowed time to explore Arusha, and a guide to take you round. Most of them just want to get out of town as fast as possible and get you out to see the game. Where will you be staying?

Apart from the obvious risks, I felt I could walk around the main part of the town with my eye’s shut. All the road layouts are still the same, and many of the buildings are unchanged. You’ll be going round saying, Ah, I remember that.

Back in 1994 we found the old maternity ward in the Arusha Hospital where my brother was born - and maybe you.

The photo I took of it (http://www.ntz.info/gen/n00025.html#04073 ) appeared on the BBC web site recently - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3094543.stm but they claimed that it was obtained from a press agency in Dar es Salaam!

I could go on . . .

Hope to hear more from you.

 

Extract ID: 4703

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 102
Extract Date: 1950's


Sorry the photos of the school are not too good. Colour has faded. Bryn Jones is the man sitting down, on mount Meru also in the fancy dress photo. Remember those! The 2 sitting at the top were one of the teachers. I will try and track down my autograph book and then I will be able to tell you some of the names of the teachers at that time. Mrs Bennett was the art teacher I think.

Extract ID: 4340

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 103
Extract Date: 1950's


Sorry the photos of the school are not too good. Colour has faded. Bryn Jones is the man sitting down, on mount Meru also in the fancy dress photo. Remember those! The 2 sitting at the top were one of the teachers. I will try and track down my autograph book and then I will be able to tell you some of the names of the teachers at that time. Mrs Bennett was the art teacher I think.

Extract ID: 4341

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 104
Extract Date: 1950's


Sorry the photos of the school are not too good. Colour has faded. Bryn Jones is the man sitting down, on mount Meru also in the fancy dress photo. Remember those! The 2 sitting at the top were one of the teachers. I will try and track down my autograph book and then I will be able to tell you some of the names of the teachers at that time. Mrs Bennett was the art teacher I think.

Extract ID: 4342

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Miriam Watters (Pope)
Page Number: 2004 05 29
Extract Date: 1953-61

Miriam Pope - Arusha School 1959-1961

G'day David!

Congratulations on your website - it is a fascinating and a great browse!

My names is Miriam Watters nee Pope. I now live in Brisbane, Australia but I lived East Africa from 1953 until 1961. - spending 3 years in Arusha from 1959 to 1961 (aged 8 to 11). Your website was a trip down memory lane especially with the photo of staff and students in front of Arusha School. I wonder if my face is amongst the students - I was there about the time it was taken!

Mr. Hamshere was a wonderful headmaster and I remember my favourite teacher was Janet Jewell and of course who could forget "BL Jones!

In my autograph book I also have the names of other teachers - H. Tofte, Margaret Crow and V. Gormley. Rev. Bryn Jones was a good friend to my parents Jean and Frank Pope.

Dad was Mechanical Supervisor for PWD. We have happy memories of "Hatari" being made and the excitement of John Wayne and his fellow stars coming to town. I actually met John Wayne, Valentine DeVargis, Red Buttons and Howard Hawks in the Safari Hotel where they were enjoying a beer!

Dad went on safari with our neighbour Hugh Lamprey to catch the rhino for the film and Mum was an extra, chosen through her involvement with the Little Theatre. She acted in many fine plays along with Paddy Purchase .

I read with interest, Michele Calorio's letter on your website. I would love to contact her as I have a photo taken at a children's birthday party held by Mrs Calorio and from memory it was for her daughter Luisa Calorio.

I would be happy for you to include my name on your website and pass my email on to Michele.

Our neighbours in Springvale Road were Dr. and Mrs Carloni and children Nicoletta and Roger. I keep in contact with David "Titch" North-Lewis (now in UK), Melody, Rosemary (both UK) and Nigel Purchase (Kenya) and Joy Thomson (New Zealand).

Joy's father was Rev. Thomson from the Anglican Church. Other names I remember from my class are: Susan Totman, Yvonne Zikarkis, Jane Atlee, Peter Owen-Pawson and Peter French. My younger sister Vanessa was best friends with Elizabeth Cashin. My brother Alan was in the junior school. I also went to Sunday school at the Anglican Church - which has been beautifully kept and looks as good as when we attended church there.

I returned to Arusha in 2002 with my special friend Janet McGavin (who now lives in the UK) who also attended Arusha School. We first met as toddlers in Tabora and we have been close friends since then. One of the current teachers at Arusha School, Shaibu Pelle, showed us around the school. It was a very emotional visit - especially seeing the old tortoise again!

Before moving to Arusha my family lived in Dar-es-salaam where I went to St. Joseph's School for 6 months (in 1956) then we moved to Lindi until 1958. We left Tanzania just after Uhuru, in November 1961, and migrated to Australia in 1962.

By sheer chance I met Colin Swynnerton here in Brisbane - we realised we must have been in the same class as he was also a student at Arusha School and remembered the same class mates names.

I'll get in touch again if my memory comes up with any other names!

Kind regards,

Miriam Watters (Pope)

Extract ID: 4854

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Geoff Jones
Page Number: 2004 11 12
Extract Date: 1954

Geoff Jones - Arusha School 1954?

I had a chat with Mark Morgan the other day and he mentioned that he had come across your site.

My name is Geoff Jones and I went out to Arusha in 1954 with my family. My father,Bryn had been appointed Chaplain Master to the school the rest of the family included my mother Pat, my sister Eira and young brother Huw.

The Headmaster at the time was Cyril Hamshere, other members of staff included H A Jones, ‘ Lanky’ Johnson and of course Bill ‘Corky’ Morgan. We had a wonderful life out there running pretty wild with the Morgan boys. My Dad became Head after Cyril Hamshere and stayed there until the end of 1969 when he returned to the U.K. to take up a Parish in South Wales.

I have had a great time looking through all the information on the site and will continue to do so. I was particularly interested to read about George Six who was a friend of Dad’s. His son Eric is now a Neuro surgeon in Texas and we met up earlier this year at an Iringan re union. I will continue to be in touch.

Thanks for your email, and the "news".

You must have arrived in Arusha a year after me. What age were you then? I was at Arusha School 1953 (aged 7) to 1957. My father was the Rector at Christ Church, just across the river Themi from the school.

I think your father was followed by David Nettelbeck as the headmaster. He went on to write a thesis about the school, and I’m hoping to get a copy in the next week or two to add to the web site.

Do please have look through your old photo albums and see if you can find a few which will be interesting to visitors to the web site.

Extract ID: 4894

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 37b


When the long awaited secondary school for European children, St Michael's and St George's, opened at Iringa in 1958, there was jubilation that all pupils who finished Standard 7 could go there. However in 1959 a selection examination was introduced and, only 15 of the 36 applicants from Arusha were admitted.

At the Silver Jubilee Speech day in 1959, Hamshere said, “Our pupils go on to other school where they distinguish themselves occasionally for scholarship, quite often for games, and always for being worthy and reliable citizens. From schools in Britain, South Africa and East Africa we receive good reports of our boys and girls, which are worth more to me than any other gift of gold or precious stones”.

In 1961, 14 children entered for the Tanganyika General Entrance Examination for secondary schools, which by this time was for all races. Only 3 of the 14 passed and Hamshere commented, “This was not surprising as most of the children were slow and backward”.

One of the immediate effects on the, curriculum of the Government take over in 1946 had been that Latin was introduced as an alternative to Swahili in Grades 5 and 6. The teaching of Swahili had been important to Wynn Jones as he tried to identify the school with the community, but Swahili was completely removed from the timetable when the Chaplain/French Master Bryn Jones arrived in 1954. French was then taught to all from Grade 3 and Latin from Grade 5.

For all his strength and gifts, Hamshere was not an educational innovator. Many exciting things went on outside the classroom, but apart from local studies in the social studies curriculum of the lower grades, the impression is of rather formal, academic classroom instruction, with outdated and dull text books, though this may have been typical of his time.

Extract ID: 4941

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 38

e. AN ENRICHING SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT:

While Hamshere found day pupils an annoying appendage to the school, it must be said to his credit that he provided for the boarders a rich and stimulating environment. It is worth listing here briefly the significant extra-curricular activities which feature in the school records.

In the very first years of the school, Wynn Jones organised students to level the playing fields and as soil was removed to top-dress them, a 15 metre swimming pool was dug. Swimming; became an important sport and recreational activity, and both a swimming gala and swimming sports day involving former pupils were held annually.

An important annual event in which Hamshere himself always took the lead was the climb of Mt. Meru (14,979') near Arusha. Some 12 to 20 trained and physically fit children made the climb and an attractive certificate was presented to those who “conquered”.

A school sports day was held each year, usually in the presence of some distinguished quest such as the Governor and Lady Twining in 1955.There was also an inter school sports day against the Greek and Dutch schools, but no competitive sports with African schools.

Carols by Candlelight, begun by the music mistress in 1947,,became a significant even for Arusha town.

A Christmas play preceded the annual Speech Day at which the Warden or his deputy presented the prizes.

A proliferation of cups and shields, was accumulated from old students members of the School Council. These included

the Wynn Jones memorial scripture prizes,

the Rasharasha prizes for “dependability, helpfulness and behaviour”,

the Ann Revington Cup for the best all round girl and

the Du Toit cup for the best all round boy;

there was a Selian cup for physical culture,

an Ann Hazel Cup for swimming.

House Shields for swimming and athletics carved by a blind African wood carver and house trophies for rounders, hockey diving, football, rugby, netball and cricket.

There were inter school visits and sports matches with Nairobi School and Mombasa Primary School.

An annual school magazine was published from 1955 to 1965, and

there were troops of Guides, Brownies and Scouts.

From fund raising within the school, horses were purchased in 1954 and 2 tennis courts built in 1958.

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the founding of the school in 1959, a bronze plaque noting the association of the school with the Diocese was unveiled in Christ Church Arusha, a special thanksgiving service was held, and £2,000 was collected for a Silver Jubilee Library. Bishop Chambers, whose foresight in 1927 had set plans in motion for the school, came at the age of 83 to open the library.

In 1943 the school was the venue for a conference of translators of the Bible into Swahili;

in 1947 delegates to the Pan African pre-history congress were accommodated in the school;

in 1950 Lady Baden Powell the Chief Guide, and later that year Lord Rowallen, the Chief Scout, visited the school;

in 1956 Princess Margaret spent 15 minutes with. the pupils in the school hall while the Hellenic and Dutch schools were allowed to line the drive! A cupboard full of Union Jacks, kept firmly locked in these post Independence days, remains as memento of the occasion.

In 1961 a conference on the preservation of wild life was held at the school and included such distinguished guests as Sir Julian Huxley, Peter Scott, Professor Monet, Armand and Michaela Dennis and Dr. Grzimek.

In 1969 the Presidents of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania met in the school to establish the East African Community.

In spite of the rapid turnover of teachers, matrons and some pupils, a strong school spirit and tradition was established. This was contributed to materially by the continuity of the School Council and of senior staff members as exemplified by

the Headmaster 1946 - 1964,

Miss I. Brown, Senior Mistress 1949 - 61,

Mrs. Fischer, Senior Matron 1950 - 59,

Mr. R. Johnson 1952 - 59,

Mr. H. Jones, Second Master 1953 - 61,

Rev. B. Jones Chaplain and from 1963 Headmaster, 1954 - 69, and

Mr. J. Hazel 1956 - 63.

Such continuity, even if for only a small proportion of the staff, was most unusual for the Colonial Service. The Department of Education, the statistics for which are not reflected in the above staff sample, could say in 1957, “there is a high rate of turnover of staff and delays in recruitment and by the end of the year, there was not one mistress who had been them 3 years previously”

Extract ID: 4942

external link

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Chris Austin
Page Number: 2009 03 19
Extract Date: 1956 to 1958

Chris Austin ~ Arusha School ~ 1956 to 1958

I went to Arusha (North House) from 1956 to 1958 and after that I went to St Michaels and St Georges in Iringa (Junior then Oram Houses) for the full length of the school's existence (Jan 59 to Dec 63), just like Eric Six whom I remember well.

I loved Arusha and hated Iringa. Arusha let us run wild, ride horses and, despite all the reviews, gave me a good primary education.

The horse riding was spectacular. There were a number of horses, one was a palomino carthorse who was incredibly uncomfortable to trot, but when she got into a gallop was just too beautiful, silky smooth and so powerful. Another was an ex race horse who went like the wind but was a bit flighty. And so much raw wild African bush to go haring about in! Who knows what today's health-and-safety culture would have made of it, but we made fun.

Down by the river was the training ring, but more importantly were loads of exotic fruit trees that were so strange to this little English boy, such as guavas and custard apples. And, of course, the huge avocados up by the playing fields.

My goodness, is that tortoise STILL there? We used to make it move by rubbing the back of its shell, and it had a big shiny patch then, and I always expected that it would wear through.

I remember two things vividly. One was a very small boy who couldn't have been much more that six who was completely unable to speak English, having been raised by his ayah to speak Swahili. The other was standing near the covered pathway that runs from the main building to the new girls dormitory ('thank you', Google Earth), promising myself that I would never speak the filthy language that the other boys spoke. It didn't last long, and soon I was master of two versions of the English language, one for school and the other for home!

I don't recall getting the tackie, but I was no angel, so probably was on the receiving end several times. Perhaps it paled into insignificance compared to Iringa where six cuts with the cane was literally that, on a bare bottom!

Nobody has yet mentioned BL's daughter Lynn, who was the prettiest girl I had ever seen (aged 10 at the time). I remember one boy (name remembered well) punching her on the nose and making it bleed!

BL was a great guy. I guess he has probably passed on, because I remember him telling us in one RI lesson that his ambition was to live to see the 2000th anniversary of Jesus' birth. I hope he made it. Anyone remember the History teachers name (it might even have been HA)? Taught us all about East African history, and that has been far more useful than all that stuff about the Stuarts and the Tudors!

If anyone wants to contact me they can do it via the link … alternatively, David Marsh has my permission to pass on my true email to anyone who requests it. It would be great to hear from anyone of the period.

Extract ID: 5983

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Andy Hannah
Page Number: 2004 02 29
Extract Date: 1957 - 60

Andy Hannah - Arusha School - 1957 - 60

Thankyou very much for opening this site.

You are very welcome to publish all of the below.

I remember Martin, Mary, and Peter Davis quite well. I was in the year above Peter and below Mary. I remember dancing with Mary!!!

Name: Andy Hannah

Years at Arusha: 1957 - 60

Older brothers Lister, Tim, Dave, were also there before me.

Masters: Morgan, Hampshire, BL Jones, HA Jones, Lanky Johnston. Pop Hazel.

Matrons: Mrs Fisher (David Read's terrfying mother) (head matron), Mrs Birchman, Miss Balfour, Miss De Beer (also terrifying), Miss Bear, Miss Pollack, Miss Randall, Miss Morrell, Mrs Evans.

Teachers: Miss Ingles (gentle and fair), Miss Monroe (loud voice), Miss Elizabeth Gray (lots of fun), Miss Jenkins (Gypsy), Miss Lundy (spunk).

Friends: Peter Bird, Christopher Ronaldson, Roger Haggerty, Itzak Abramovici, Stewart Hammond, Ian Steer, Daniel Marjocki, David Spoors, Michael Carter, George Legnani, Adrian Van Schoor, William Power, Brenda Ulliat, Henrietta Shannahan, Pauline Shannahan, Yvonne Karafiat, Susan Hunt, Nida Mogelnikskii, and others (sorry if I've left anyone out).

(Sorry if I've spelt anyone's name wrong)

Comments:

Looking back, I think that Hampshire ran a pretty tight ship. I suspect that he also knew who the nice teachers were and who the not so nice, and arranged things so that we all had our fair share of both.

However, my principal memories are negative:

It was like a jail, and we were regimented a lot of the time.

There was always an anxiety that I'd do something wrong and get the tacky (or HA Jones' "persuader"). I didn't get punished that often, but half the time it was for an innocent absent-minded mistake.

My time in standard 3 was particularly unhappy because I was landed with a sociopathic dorm-leader.

Some of the female teachers went out of their way to make us feel small.

I think the most positive aspect was the friendships formed.

I would be delighted to get in contact with any of the above.

I live in Melbourne, Australia. I am married and have 4 kids (2 eldest have left home).

Great to hear from you, and thanks for your memories which I shall add to the web site when I next do an update.

You mention Mrs Fisher (David Read's terrfying mother)! I must tell that to David Read. I met him last October, and hope to see him again when I go back to Arusha at the end of May.

Your surname sent me back to my parent’s archives, and I’ve found one slide of the Ball family, plus Timothy Hannah standing in the garden. I’m not sure if you have worked it out from the web site, that my father was the rector of Christ Church Arusha from 1953-57, and I seem to remember that we had various boys to tea on Sunday afternoons. I’ve been looking, but so far haven’t had enough to time find anything more, but I seem to remember that your father’s names was Wells or Welsley.

I really need to go back to my fathers diaries to check my memories, and I could well be confusing you all with another family. But I seem to remember also that your father was in London in the early 60’s and he took me to a rally in Methodist Central Hall, Westminster at which Dr Hastings Banda was speaking.

My slide scanner is on loan at the moment, but when I can I’ll see if I can send you a copy of Timothy’s picture and any other pictures I might find in the meantime.

I’ve also got a couple of copies of the Arusha School Magazine, and see that in 1955 Timothy Hannah won a Standard I Form Prize!

Thank-you for your reply.

By the time I arrived at Arusha School, your family had left the vicarage, but I get the impression that both Tim and Dave spent a fair time at your house. In fact, I think it was your Mum who introduced meringues to our family - via Tim who insisted on our Mum trying to make them.

Yes, Dad's name was Wellesley, and he was working at the time as a medical missionary in Mvumi, near Dodoma.

Extract ID: 4975

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: S. Lisette Micek (Moulinie)
Page Number: 2008 02 24
Extract Date: 1957 - 61

Arusha School Alumnus (1957 - 61)

What a wonderful surprise reading all the memories of school life in Arusha…

The tortoise was my silent witness to all those anxious thoughts and fears of the tacky and the innocent errors in judgement mentioned by Andy Hannah.

I think of an Italian girl (possibly Andrea?) whose cries we heard as we cringed in our beds while she got the tacky for daring to use the toilet after 'lights out.' Where was the logic? So, we wet the bed and that was OK?

Even lovable Miss Jewell, gave the tacky to 3 girls who filled their skirts with the beautiful jacaranda blossoms and lay in wait behind a tree to surprise her with a tribute of showering petals. I missed the punishment only because I was late to the surprise event.

I was in love with Huw Jones ;) and would beg off those Sunday afternoon walks to play cricket with him…Would love to know how he is…His Father was so sweet. I was in Huw's class and I believe his Dad taught French and would ask me to pronounce the words for the class (we spoke French at home).

There was Margaret in the front of the class who had the most infectious giggle… Bryn Jones would say, 'Now, who's tickling Maggie…' leading to another 5 minutes of hysterical giggles.

Who was the strict head matron who always did those frightful tapestries….her houseboy was not to be trusted around little girls and on one errand to her flat I discovered the speed with which I could descend the stairs.

Who was the music teacher with the blue rinse and glass eye who taught knitting?

The beautiful pianist with the perfect french roll hairdo.

The kitchen lady…very stern, who picked up all the bread crusts from under the table one night and had them displayed to us by Mr. Hampshire. What a lecture that was.

I too remember the 3 elephants from the John Wayne film who were brought to the field. A few were chosen to ride then they turned on the sprinklers so that the elephants could play. We also stood along the side of the road to watch the filming in action.

Some names of students I remember: Huw Jones, Birgit Lund of Moshi where I too spent Half Term, Giles Dingwall, Lesley Truesdale and Katherine Tregarthen whose Mum was gorgeous and brought us lollies at the Sanitorium.

Love your website...a healing experience.

Extract ID: 5570

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Sandro Legnani
Page Number: 2004 03 06
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Sandro Legnani - Arusha School 1958-1962

Dear Madams and Sirs,

my name is Sandro Legnani, and I'd like to enter your feedback as an old Arusha primary school student. I was born in Dar-Es-Salaam in 1951 and with my travelled around the country in several sisal estates, where my father was a chief engineer.

I attended Arusha school from april 1958 till december 1962. I remeber Mr. Hamshere as my headmaster (even his cane) and Mr. Jones was one of my teachers together with Miss Jenkins. I climbed Mount Meru in 1962 with other 9 or 10 students.

My memories are coming back, I'm excited in finding a piece of my history. Let me dig in my memories and recollect them. I left the country, for Italy, in 1968 after my father got seriously ill and never since then returned. Even the English language is not so good now I'm always speaking Italian.

I'll write again and with the help of my brother George (in Arusha from 1956 to 1960 then went to Iringa) we will find some photos of the school and of Arusha and scan them for you.

Bye for now

Sandro

Extract ID: 4860

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Sarah C Slater ( nee Burnett )
Page Number: 2004 10 24
Extract Date: 1958-1963

Sarah Burnett - Arusha School 1958-1963

I was @ arusha school during the years above.

My parents are Joan & George Burnett. My father was an entymologist, & worked @ the Colonial (Tropical) Pesticides Reseach Institute.

My brother Patrick & sister Victoria were also @ the school.

I think I was in the same class as Vanessa Pope, Elizabeth Cashin, Rosemary Purchase, Geraldine Swynnerton, John Bovennizer, Emile Karafiat, Pamela Carter & Joyce Thompson, Huw Jones, Diana Yeo.

I think Sandro Legnani was in the same class as my brother.

Does anybody remember the Beaumont family who farmed @ Sharok?

Or the McPhillips, an Irish family of 10 children who's mother was a doctor at Meru Hospital?

I remember BL Jones & family well, & Miss Jenkins & Mrs Papadopoulos amongst others.

My parents kept in touch with Paddy Purchase, father of Rosemary, Nigel & Melody & Doug & Margaret Yeo whio were neighbours & colleagues of my father.

My Mum is very ill now. I would love to be able to pass on news to her. She was an artist & used to run art classes on our lawn. Her & my father were very active in the Little Theatre, Arusha. He used to build the sets & she would paint them. I remember being Fairy Crystal Fountain in a production of Sleeping Beauty, in a wonderful white tutu made by a lady, I think Mrs. Bloom, who had been a profesional costume designer.

Does any one remember Narajan Singh, the grocer? I remember it being an Aladdin's cave of sweeties & the lovely kind staff.

My parents moved to Aberdeen Scotland, where they still are. I lived in Scotland until 2000, & now live in Suffolk, England. I would be absolutely delighted to hear from any-one from those idyllic childhood years.

Sarah C Slater ( nee Burnett )

Lots of memories, and names - thank you. I’ll be updating the database in the next week or so, and will include your email, which I’m sure will trigger some responses.

There have been some recent feedback emails mentioning some of your names. Did you see the email from Miriam Pope mentioning the Purchases and the Little Theatre. I’ve also just this week been sent a photo which includes Emil Karrafiat - it should be on the web site with the next update.

As for Naranjan Singh - did you see the clips on the site from Hatari

I heard that after independence he moved to India, and became very rich with a department store. His sons have been in England, and visited someone I know who had been in Arusha in the 1950’s.

Thank you so much for the fascinating information. The web-site is a wonderful resource & the work that goes into producing it is much appreciated.

I printed out some of the pictures of the School, Boma & Hospital ( where I was born) for my parents, which were pored over, & recognised by all the family. They were totally amazed, being internet 'unfriendly'!

Extract ID: 4899

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Dr James Eva
Page Number: 2007 12 31
Extract Date: 1958-63

James Eva - Arusha School - 1958-63

I lived at Geita gold mine near Mwanza from 1951 to 1966.

My sister Sheryl attended Arusha scool from 1957, and I joined her in 1958. We were there until 1963, after which she went to highschool in England, and I went to St Mary's in Nairobi.

During our time Mr Hampshire was headmaster, 'BL' Jones was vice principal (and in charge of sport and Meru-climbing), and a Miss Bailey was the fierce matron in charge of dormitories.

The old tortoise was already old (we said 100 years) back then, and I am amazed he is still around!

I was good friends with 'Schmedjie' Schmedgebakker, whose parents were Finnish and lived at Moshi, Mark Orr, whose dad was the gameranger in charge for Ngorogoro game park, Allan Sanger, an English boy, Rudiger Vogs, who, like me, came from Geita, and Robert Masimba, one of the first African children to attend the school.

I am delighted to find this very sentimental site. I will be taking my wife to visit Arusha in 2008.I am a very busy consultant Psychiatrist in Cornwall, UK, and have not until now spent the time to do that. Thank you for the reminder !

Extract ID: 5552

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Monica Harper nee DAUBER
Page Number: 2007 08 05
Extract Date: 1960's

Message for Sarah Slater nee Burnett.

I remember your family well. They lived two doors away and I vividly remember being taken to see Patrick when he was first born. He had an amazing wooden cot!

Sarah, your mother was a really talented artist and my father treasued a picture she gave him. The Arusha school site is very nostalgic!! BL Jones, Mrs Fischer, etc. etc.

I am going to Arusha in September to climb Kili before I get too old!!

Hope to see the tortoise, it was still there in 1995 when I was last there.

Yes, I remember the McPhillips family; what about the de Haaf boys? Do you remeber the Christmas Parties at the Club?

Extract ID: 5430

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Deryck Matthews
Page Number: 2004 05 13
Extract Date: 1963

Deryck Matthews Arusha School 1963

The Arusha School Alumni website I have just stumbled across, has jerked back some wonderful memories. I was headboy in 1963 and Mr Hampshire was headmaster and Mr "BL" Jones was my tutor. Although some details have faded over the years some names and faces are still with me. In particular Karsten Lund and John Bovenisor whose families kindly took me in during the half-term breaks, as my family lived in Tabora, a dusty two day trek by train and bus.

And in that photo, back row top left, is myself and my younger brother Chris !!!!!

Thanks for the memories.

Kindest Regards

Extract ID: 4717

See also

Nettelbeck, David A history of Arusha School, Tanzania
Page Number: 45a

b. A TOLERANT AND BENEVOLENT ERA:

Hamshere who hesitantly and reluctantly brought to birth the new multi-racial era left in 1963 with many of his staff recruited by the colonial government and the Chaplain-Master Bryn Jones, took over as Headmaster.

By all accounts, he was an easy-going, good-natured tolerant person who didn't exert himself much, but got on well with parents and teachers. His speech day comment above is typical of the man.

It would be easy to be critical of a rather slack administration and falling academic standards in the latter half of the 1960s. However Jones had to cope with a rapid turnover of temporary and part time staff, with only a nucleus recruited through the Ministry of Overseas Development and the British salary supplement scheme; He also had a pioneering job in uniting races who up to then had been, socially, mutually exclusive; he had two sons of President Nyerere and other children of Government Ministers until the Arusha Declaration in 1967 steered Tanzanians back onto the course of socialism and Swahili medium education; and all of this at a time when the very presence of an expatriate was a touchy and uncertain thing in Tanzania.

The fact that the school remained open at all as an English - medium primary school with the same staff/pupil ratio, standard of boarding; catering, etc. as before, and the fact that the school was welded into a happy, tolerant and united community must bear tribute to Bryn Jones style of management and personality. English - medium schools such as Lushoto, Moshi, Mbeya and others were closed or converted to Swahili - medium during this period.

Extract ID: 4946

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Alex King
Page Number: 2007 11 13

Byrn Jones

I was at Arusha school 1963-66, we called him 'BL' and under our breath 'Bloody liar'. we were scared to death of him.

Extract ID: 5504

See also

Arusha School Headmasters
Extract Date: 1964-69

B.L.Jones

Arusha School Headmaster

Extract ID: 4582

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Shirley Round (nee Jackson)
Page Number: 2009 01 24
Extract Date: 1966-68

Shirley Round (nee Jackson) ~ Arusha School ~ 1966-68

Firstly can I saw what a joy it has been this afternoon to come across this site and relive so many memories. I have to say that I even shed a tear when I found a picture taken recently of the good old tortoise from my old school. I never guessed he would still be with us after all these years.

I was a boarder at Arusha School and like some of the others I have fond memories although most of the things I remember are actually of the harsh treatment we got as kids e.g.: lining up on Saturday mornings for nail inspection and the inevitable spankings for bitten nails, spankings on wet bottoms in the showers with leather soled flip flops. Ouch.

Unlike some my memories of the food are not great, I have not been able to enjoy Shepherds Pie since then, I remember corn flakes and boilded eggs on Sunday instead of the usual weekday porridge but the eggs were often occupied.

Someone on your site mentioned the dinning room boys and I certainly remember Twiga. I don’t remember any teachers other than Bryn Jones of course and Matron was Mrs Toft. I think the one that was keen on the slipper was Ms De Silva and I remember she disappeared rather suddenly causing lots of speculation and gossip between us girls. I also remember the swahili teacher who had the habit of picking you up off your feet by your ears if caught talking etc.

Moving on to friends from that time I remember the first boy I kissed was called Rodger but I don’t know his second name. Like another correspondent my first boy friend was Richard Hatter and I think I still have a picture of us both together. My great friends at the time were Noreen Coot who came and stayed with me in Moshi during the holidays I seem to remember and also a girl called Catherine Fagan who was Australian for Adelaide. I also remember a girl called Sally, again I cant remember her surname but we were regularly punished together at mealtimes for spilling food.

I will have to get out my old autograph book and look up some more names.

Please pass on my email address, if anyone wants to get in touch that would be great.

I think I probably have some old photos and a bit of old cine film (now on video) so please get in touch if I can be of any assistane to you.

Extract ID: 5949

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Logan Steiner ( aka Pat Green)
Page Number: 2008 05 22
Extract Date: 1967 to 1969


Logan Steiner ( aka Pat Green) Arusha School 1967-69

I was at Arusha school from about 1967-66 to 1969, and a few names I recognise, I think I remember Fe McIntyre and definately Danuta. I had a picture of Danuta holding a 'rounders' bat. I don't know if anyone remembers me. I was the one that fell down one Sunday, cut open my leg and they had to rush me to hospital and because of that, no one went for that 'Sunday' swim. It was all because I was racing to the dining room to get the cup of hot chocolate we always had on Sundays.

I had a best friend named Dorothy and Linda (can't remember last names). Dorothy always took me home at half-term to her farm. I think her cousin was Micheal Rothbletz (not sure of the spelling) that I had such a crush on. Linda was the one that alway stuck up for me when someone teased me about being a P.Green or a Green P!!! I'd love to chat with anyone about those days. I remember Mr. Jones, the Headmaster and his daughter Peta. I think all the other teachers, except the music teacher, I'd like to forget. They were very cruel to us kids.

Do you remember the 'Leek dish' we had and everyone hated it? We didn't eat it, so the next night we were served with no dinner! Jones wife was the cook. How many times were we locked in because we didn't shower quick enough? And those midnight feasts with a tin of Milo and saved sweets from the 'tuck cupboard'??

Extract ID: 5720

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Margaret Thompson
Page Number: 401
Extract Date: 2007 02 18

Margaret Thompson nee Barratt Oldest of Thora's Children

I was interested to read Marjories recollections, I haven't been able to access this site for some time due to isp probs'

Ted's Name was Winton not William

The Hotel was built an owned by Painters who sold it on to Grandfather.

Ray was the First White Hunter to put down his gun and run hunting with Camera Safaris in East Africa. He would pick up his clients from Dar es Salaam, drive up through the Serengetti and back through Arusha finally to Mombasa where they would go aboard their ship for travel to Europe. Mostly the British India Line, sometimes the Union Castle Lines, but all before air travel.

He took Roosevelt on at least one safari

His movies won awards at the Edinburgh Festival just before the second world war broke out, the film was allegedly lost at sea although some shots were later recognised as being from that film.

Ray was also a brilliant experimental cook, he loved to try out pickles etc.

He had a wonderful imagination and I own the Mural that he had painted by Lone Oak (a tramp who walked from Cape to Cairo and Cairo to the Cape - he would be worth investigating as he was a brilliant Painter and left a legacy of beautiful murals on many homes in the Ol Donyo Sambu area)

The Mural I own depicts the Northern Province of Tanganyika as seen from 20,ooo feet up, drawn & painted just after ww1, it is remarkably accurate and shows what a detailed knowledge grandpa had of the district.

I am the oldest of Thora & Oswald Barrat's Children.

Bryn Jones was the Minister for the Church of England in Arusha, used to wear football shorts and boots under his cassock at church

Extract ID: 5178
www.nTZ.info