Arusha: New Arusha Hotel

Name ID 29

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Arusha Integrated Regional Development Plan
Page Number: 7b
Extract Date: 1900-1916

The first commercial area

Paper III. Urban Development & the Growth of Communications

The first commercial area lay between the Boma and the Clock Tower, with a hotel on the site of the present New Arusha Hotel. Commencing with single storey thatched roof duks, some double storey iron roofed buildings went up in German times and were only demolished in the post war period.

Extract ID: 3232

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Arusha Integrated Regional Development Plan
Page Number: 29
Extract Date: 1916-1934

First expansion in the British period

Paper III. Urban Development & the Growth of Communications

The first expansion in the British period was the Babati Road area, laid out as a commercial area on the present market site, surrounded by dwelling sites which were taken up by immigrant Tanzanians who built typical 'Swahili' houses with mud walls and thatched roofs.

By 1934 the main Babati Road lay out had by no means been fully taken up, there were large gaps towards the station, which itself had been built on arrival of the railway in 1929. Water was drawn from the rivers running throught the town; the only piped supply was laid on privately by the New Arusha Hotel. Sanitation was by bucket, collected by gangs of prisoners.

The next expansion was the low density dwelling area to the east, including the golf course. To a sociologist it appeared difficult to justify the eviction of peasant ciltivators living at a density of over 1000 to the square mile to give Europeans space to knock a small rubber ball around. But the town planners pointed out the desirability of having an open area between the low density housing and the peasant cultivation to control the spread of disease, particularly Malaria!.

Extract ID: 3233

external link

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Hazel Redgrave, nee Miller
Page Number: 2008 09 27
Extract Date: 1950's

Arusha postcards

photo is item for sale on www.delcampe.com on 4 Oct 2008

We've all heard of eBay, but have you heard of an American auction site: www.delcampe.com ? I bought some super postcards of 1950s Kampala there, and at present there are four postcards of Arusha, three of them from the '50s I think.

Thought you might like to take a peek. Kind regards, Hazel.

Thanks - and lots of stamps.

Copy of the New Arusha Hotel pc included here, and the Safari Hotel in the next extract.

Antique (Vintage) Original Postcard, Standard Size Postcard (3.5" by 5.5"), Real Photograph, 1920-1940s. Excellent Condition

Extract ID: 5813

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 202a
Extract Date: 1907

Kenyon Painter invests in Arusha

After German East Africa became Tanganyika, one of its most significant investors was Kenyon Painter, an Ohio entrepreneur who first came to Arusha on a safari in 1907. He bought 11,000 acres of land outside the town and developed the region's premier coffee estate. He gave the town its first post office, built a church, a hospital, and then an advanced coffee research center at a place called Tengeru, sixteen miles from Arusha. Painter invested eleven million dollars in and around Arusha. His single storey New Arusha Hotel was one of the regions's most noted landmarks, and was headquarters for the Tanganyika Tours and Safaris Company.

Extract ID: 3428

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Alexandra
Page Number: 2008 11 14
Extract Date: 1920's

Bloom's, Selian History

I am working to document some history on Burka and Selian Coffee Estates. This includes the history of Bloom's Arusha Hotel, as this family went on to purchase part of what now is Burka Estates, The New Arusha Hotel, who had extensive contact with the Bloom family. I am also looking for any information on a Captain J.A. Hewer, who bought Burka originally, The origins of the Arusha Coffee Lodge and anything in between. Any letters, pictures, or just little facts would be of great interest to me.

Thank you for your help,

Extract ID: 5888

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: Valentine Marc Nkwame
Page Number: 388a
Extract Date: 24 Sep 2005

"Were there two Arusha Hotels in the early Nineties?"

The Arusha Hotel's family legend confusion 'Blooms' out again

"Were there two Arusha Hotels in the early Nineties?"

The legend behind The Arusha Hotel still goes on, but so is the confusion. This week, the great grand daughter of the person believed to have been the hotel's original owner, appeared in Arusha after traveling all the way from Canada to re-discover the former dwelling place for her earliest family members, tracing the family tree in the process.

Dana Bloom aged 26, is a Toronto-based, practicing lawyer, whose great grand father, Goodall Bloom together with his wife, Mrs Jane Bloom, then hailing from Manchester, England, is said to have owned and operated The Arusha Hotel since it was established in 1894, then standing as a twelve roomed, mud-walled, hut-like Inn, then known as the 'Bloom's Hotel.'

During those days, both Mr and Mrs Bloom used to live at the hotel premises, receiving and catering for their guests just like the old, road-side Inns, that have been immortalized in Charles Dickens' novels, for ages.

The couple's first born, named Jack Bloom, died in 1909 aged only 2 years old and was buried within the hotel grounds. This grave was among the landmarks that Dana managed to discover during her recent visit to The Arusha Hotel, early this week. Her story goes:

" In 1937 my grandfather, Algy Bloom traveled from England to come and visit his uncle, Mr Goodall Bloom who was running a hotel in Arusha town of Tanganyika." Apparently, Dana's grandmother, who was also on the trip, had collected a number of old letters and photographs that were taken in Arusha in the early days and kept them in her chest.

In addition to the hotel, the Blooms, were also said to have bought Selian coffee estate in the 50s. The couple had two sons; Judah and Poli. The former, Captain Judah Bloom was to run the estate until his death in 1957.

These souvenirs were only to be discovered at the turn of the new Millennium, about six years ago when the grandmother, Doris Bloom died. Dana's father, Brian Bloom who had by then already retired in Toronto Canada, flew back to England and collected all his mother's belongings, taking them to Canada.

"So I was going through my late grandmother's things and suddenly I came across those old pictures, some handwritten, mailed letters and I discovered The Arusha Hotel's family legend in which I happen to be part of," said Dana. "After the findings, I went to the Internet and searched for more information and here I am!"

With a compass being its trademark, The Arusha Hotel shouldn't be a difficult place to find, especially being located at the 'center point' between Cape Town and Cairo, but did Dana and her husband, Robert Klein (29) discover the right hotel?

Was there another 'Arusha Hotel?'

Raymond and Marjorie Ulyate, whose families were part of the original settlers that landed in South Africa in 1820 are on the other hand, said to be the original owners of The Arusha Hotel. Marjorie Borissow, who lives in Australia, is yet another grand daughter of this other 'former owner' and she also has her own story to tell as well:

"My grandfather and his family then went on and became some of the first pioneers around Kijabe in Kenya. Grandpa started taking people out on safari in the early 1900's. He worked for Newlands & Tarlton He even gets a mention in Theodore Roosevelt's Book Äfrican Game Trails" That was on the safari in 1910 ."

Grandpa bought Meru Estate near Lake Duluti after the first world war. When enemy property farms were being sold (German). They had that until one Mr K V Painter who was an American persuaded him to sell the farm and take over the 'New Arusha Hotel!"

According to Marjorie, the original 'Arusha Hotel' was built opposite the "old man Blooms Arusha hotel!" Now her statement indicates that, there should have been two hotels that were located on the same grounds. The Blooms Hotel dates back to 1894. What about the Ray Ulyate's hotel?

"Reading from some of my Mum's notes." Says Marjorie. "She remembers that they had The Prince of Wales (first name in the visitors book) attended the opening ball in 1928. So I guess it was around this time when the hotel opened!"

Extract ID: 5089

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504c

Building the New Arusha Hotel

An American Mr. K V Painter started building the New Arusha Hotel in 1927 on the south side of clock tower at its present location. Arusha already had the Arusha Hotel located on the right hand corner of the road leading up to the Boma. It was owned by Jane and Goodall Bloom. My mother had vivid recollections of those days.

Grand father Ray was to lease the New Arusha Hotel in 1928 from K V Painter who during the same period purchased Meru Estate from Ray. The opening ball of the Hotel was attended by the Prince of Wales Edward the eighth (the un-crowned King.) The Hotel register with the Prince of Wales signature remains in the possession of some member of the family! The register was treasured by my late Grandmother Marjorie Ann Ulyate.

On the sale of Meru Estate Grandfather Ray was to start the Safari Company Tanganyika Big Game and Tourist Organization operating out of the New Arusha Hotel. The company was to become well known for its six day Safari’s to the Ngoronogoro Crater and Serengeti Plains and brought world renown to the lions. Grandfather Ray was to take many famous people on photographic Safari’s.

Extract ID: 4744

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 101
Extract Date: 11/07/2003

Arusha School

Hi David

Many thanks for your very interesting email.

To answer a couple of your questions yes I am related to Marion Langham. She is my first cousin. Do pass on my email to her if you are in contact.

Our grandparents were Raymond and Marjorie Ulyate (nee Rooken-Smith). Their families were part of the original settlers that landed in South Africa in 1820. My grandfather and his family then went on and became some of the first pioneers around Kajabe in Kenya.

Grandpa started taking people out on safari in the early 1900's. He worked for Newlands & Tarlton He even gets a mention in Theodore Roosevelts Book Äfrican Game Trails" That was on the safari in 1910 .

Grandpa bought Meru Estate near Lake Duluti after the first world war. When enemy property farms were being sold (German). They had that until a Mr K V Painter - an American persuaded him to sell the farm and take over the New Arusha Hotel (It was built opposite "'old man Blooms Arusha hotel" )

Reading from some of Mums notes she remembers that they had The Prince of Wales (first name in the visitors book) attended the opening ball in 1928. So I guess it was around this time the hotel opened.

See the article I am sending. I have heaps of other bit and pieces.

Following are a couple of photos of the hotel and an original postcard with the sign that my Grandpa wrote. I even have a Coloured letterhead of the hotel written to my mother 26 July 1930 .

Raymond and Marjorie had six children.

Jack,

Vivian (my mother who married Boris Borissow)

Thora (Marions Mother who married Oswald Barratt)

Ken,

Malham &

Ted (William)

I think Malham & Ted went to the school and most of the offspring went to Arusha School at some stage.(About 32 of us)

Ted's Wife - Kay Ulyate ran the Sanitorium for a long time. Many a day was spent there with measles, chicken pox or whatever.

Grandpa sold the New Arusha Hotel to their daughter Thora Barratt and also sold their other hotel the Lion Cub at Moshi to my mother Vivian Borissow.

I am sure Marion knows heaps more of the history than I do. I was one of the babies in the family!

Sorry the photos of the school are not too good. Colour has faded. Bryn Jones is the man sitting down, on mount Meru also in the fancy dress photo. Remember those! The 2 sitting at the top were one of the teachers. I wil try and track down my autograph book and then I will be able to tell you some of the names of the teachers at that time. Mrs Bennett was the art teacher I think.

I am glad to hear all your news about the school. What on earth took you back to Arusha and remind me again where you presently live.

I have just spent an hour hunting around. So time has got away.

Take care and please keep in touch and I dont mind you passing on my email to anyone who may remember me.

Marjorie Borissow

PS I caught up with a video made from old cine film taken of one of grandpas safaris. Rare footage.

Extract ID: 4339

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: anon
Page Number: 107
Extract Date: 1953

'Piece of History' to vanish

cutting sent by Marjorie Borissow

The news that the New Arusha Hotel is to be rebuilt has met with a certain sadness as well as pleasure.

Of course, the town is pleased that the African Tours and Hotels Ltd. has so much faith in the future of the tourist industry that it is willing to go on with the plans to rebuild the hotel and spend somewhere in the region of £110,000 in the process.

The sadness comes with the disappearance of a "piece of history". How changed life will be when it is no longer possible to sit on the verandah of the "New A" and watch the world go by as one waits for a friend or a bus or just waits!

Royal Reception

Thousands of tourists and V.I.P.'s have passed through the New Arusha and hundreds of dances and dinners have been held there. The first function held in fact took place before it was opened - a dance and reception for the Prince of Wales in December, 1927, the hotel being officially opened the following January.

The New owner was Mr. K.V. Painter an American who leased it to Mr Ray Ulyate. The name New Arusha arose because there had already been an Arusha Hotel across the road owned and run by Jane and Goodall Bloom.

Mr Ulyate started what is believed to be the first safaris by camera at the hotel when he formed his Tanganyika big game and tourist organisation, offereing a seven-day photographic safari in the Serengeti.

Extract ID: 4345

See also

Trzebinski, Errol Silence Will Speak
Extract Author: Bror Blixen
Page Number: 386a
Extract Date: 16 November 1928

Arusha en fete

from African Hunter, by Bror von Blixen-Finecke, pub Cassell, London 1937 p153

On 16 November the party arrived at Arusha. Denys had contacted Bror arranging to meet him there.

It was an unofficial visit but all the town was en fete. The hotel was giving a dance; the Masai had arranged an Ngoma. A battalion of the King's African Rifles was paraded for inspection; a football match had been fixed up, there was as complete a festival atmosphere as the little town at the foot of Mt Meru could achieve. My wife and I had driven our 115 miles into the town like the rest and pitched camp not far from the hotel. I was just shaking a cocktail when a little man came into the tent and said: `I'm the Prince of Wales, and should like to make your acquaintance. '

Extract ID: 4659

See also

Arusha: A Brochure of the Northern Province and its Capital Town
Page Number: 04a
Extract Date: 1929

The New Arusha Hotel

photo of the New Arusha Hotel in a clear setting, with cars parked oustide.

Beside the Hotel door there is signage for 'Brown and Barratt'

Extract ID: 32

See also

Arusha: A Brochure of the Northern Province and its Capital Town
Page Number: 08
Extract Date: 1929

The New Arusha Hotel

If you wish to have a real enjoyable holiday, then go to Arusha and stay at the New Arusha Hotel, where you will obtain Hot and Cold Water in all Bed-rooms, Modern Sanitation, Teak Dancing Floor, Electric Light and really excellent food as well as Golf. Tennis, Big Game and Bird shooting.

IN THE CENTRE OF THREE TERRITORIES: KENYA, TANGANYIKA & UGANDA

and Midway between the CAPE and CAIRO on the All Red Route.

ADDRESS:

TELEGRAMS: "CENTRE," ARUSHA.

LETTERS Box 88, ARUSHA, TANGANYIKA.

Extract ID: 18

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 109


Following are a couple of photos of the hotel . . .

Extract ID: 4347

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 110


Following are a couple of photos of the hotel . . .

Extract ID: 4348

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Ngorongoro: The Eighth Wonder
Page Number: 110

Commercial Trips

... during the 1930's two pioneers rendered great service to wildlife by encouraging the swing from shooting to photography. The first was the late R.R. (Ray) Ulyate, proprietor of the New Arusha Hotel who organised trips on a commercial basis from Arusha to the Serengeti for the purposes of lion photography.

Extract ID: 46

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 111


. . . and an original postcard with the sign that my Grandpa wrote

Extract ID: 4349

See also

Fosbrooke, Henry Arusha Integrated Regional Development Plan
Page Number: 32
Extract Date: 1930's

Another stimulus to Arusha's development

Paper III. Urban Development & the Growth of Communications

Another stimulus to Arusha's development was its good position as a tourist centre. As early as 1922 a party came by car from Kenya and set of with porters to the Ngorongoro area. Another came in 1923. There are several books and unpublished diaries describing these early safaris. But the more signficant development occurred in the early 1930's when the making of the road over the Ngorongoro and to the Serengeti enabled Ray Ulyate, the proprietor of the New Arusha Hotel, to organise safaris to the Serengeti where lions were attracted by meat to approach closely to vehicles to permit close-up phototography. Foolish tricks were indulged in, such as tugs-of-war with lions holding a lump of meat at the end of a rope, or even being tempted to jump on the backs of open trucks. These practices were controlled when a Game Ranger was posted to Banagi.

There was considerable incursion from Kenya in the pre-war period, both through Arusha and directly to the Serengeti via Clyne's [Klein's] camp, named after an early white hunter.

Extract ID: 3234

See also

Arusha Times
Page Number: 388b
Extract Date: 24 Sep 2005


The Arusha Hotel as it looked in the early 1930s.

Extract ID: 5090

See also

Arusha Times
Page Number: 388c
Extract Date: 24 Sep 2005


"The hotel claiming to be the centre between Cape Town and Cairo"

Extract ID: 5091

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marjorie Borissow
Page Number: 108

letterhead of the hotel

I even have a Coloured letterhead of the hotel written to my mother 26 July 1930 .

Extract ID: 4346

See also

Arusha for an African Holiday
Extract Date: 1936

Motor Arrangements at Arusha Season June/October and December/March. European . . .

Season June/October and December/March. European clothes can be worn - a sun helmet is essential.

Chauffeurs' Expenses. Shs 20/- for each night spent away from Arusha must be added.

Booking Instructions. Visitors should endeavour to communicate their requirements to Ray R. Ulyate, who is proprietor of the various hostels on the scenic route and who undertakes to provide transport at the prices stated in the schedule.

Postal Address PO Box 88 Arusha [the New Arusha Hotel]

Route 4..

Lake Manyara, Babati, Hanang, M'bulu, Oldeani, Ngorongoro and back to Arusha. (Circular Tour).

This tour is known as the 'scenic route'. The road has only recently been opened and the trip is strongly recommended, affording as it does the opportunity of visiting Lake Manyara, teeming with bird life, and Ngorongoro, possibly the world's greatesr crater, 12 miles in diameter, 35 miles in circumference, 2000 feet deep and containing about 100,000 head of big game. It is an outstanding sight which should not be missed when visiting East Africa. Marvellous views extending over many miles of the Great Rift Wall can be obtained.

Distance 395 miles

Time 3 days

Fares (including meals and accommodation)

1 person £20/15/0

2 persons £11/17/0 each

3 persons £8/18/9 each

Route 9.

Arusha to Ngorongoro camp and back.

The rest camp erected by the Tanganyika Government on the rim of and overlooking this crater is at an altitude of 8,000ft. and affords an excellent opportunity of seeing the greatest spectacular sights in the whole of East Africa.

(see remarks under route 4)

Total Distance 230 miles

Time 2 days

Fares, including accomodation and meals at the camp

1 person £12/15/0

2 persons £7/0/0 each

3 persons £5/2/0

Extract ID: 25

See also

Arusha for an African Holiday
Page Number: Open letter, inserted in the brochure
Extract Date: 1936

The Effect of Civilization in the Land of Big Game

The Effect of Civilization in the Land of Big Game

Dear Sir,

Civilization is rapidly extending its influence throughout the world, bringing new comforts and pleasures, at the same time many of the old things which have existed throughout the ages are quickly giving place to the new order. Has the thought ever occurred to you that in a comparatively short space of time, wild life as we know it, in this generation, will have ceased to exist. Undoubtably with a certain amount of care and preservation it will be kept going artificially for a space of time, but at its best it will only be a temporary measure.

This generation to which you and I belong is going through a period of transition, a period which will stand out in the history of the world, where the last of the old and the beginning of the new overlap.

ARE YOU AVAILING YOURSELF OF THIS OPPORTUNITY?

In many ways it is fortunate that this is so, for we have the opportunity which all the money in the world will not buy for future generations, of visiting Africa, and seeing for ourselves the wildlife as it has existed throughout the ages. This opportunity is available to this generation, after that, civilization willhave extended its arms and embraced all,and these things will be no more. On the other hand civilization and all that it means has made it possible for us to travel witht he maximum of comfort to Arusha, in East Africa, and accompish in a few weeks at a comparitively small cost what only a few years ago would have necessitated a long and tedious journey running into many months. Places can now be visited in a few hours as compared to weeks spent on the same thing only a few short years ago.

Arusha is in the centre of this big game country and you should arrange to go there for your next trip. You will find it so utterly different to all you have seen in the past, and it will certainly afford you something to talk about.

Experienced White Hunters can always be obtained and you need bring nothing more than your clothing, or if desired, a favourite rifle. Everything else can be obtained on the spot at much less cost than the usual outfit can be bought for in countries where it is not in demand.

Assuring you that everything will be done to make your visit one which you will always remember, and which will afford you the utmost pleasure and interest.

We are, dear Sir,

Yours faithfully,

The Management,

NEW ARUSHA HOTEL

Extract ID: 26

See also

Crile, Grace Skyways to a Jungle Laboratory: An African Adventure
Page Number: 187
Extract Date: January 1936

The dining-room at the New Arusha Hotel is unique

After an early lunch the Chief and I left for Arusha, where we arrived at the New Arusha Hotel, which Mr. and Mrs. Ulyate manage so efficiently, in time for tea, a bath, and a change from safari to regulation clothes. It is amazing what an inhibiting effect upon all good intentions a long tub and clear hot water have.

A messenger came to our door to say that Dr. J. H. Parry and Dr. R. C. Speirs were waiting to see the Chief about an urgent operation that they had arranged to be performed by him the next morning at the Government Hospital. I replied that the Chief knew of the appointment, was dressing, and would be ready in a few minutes. It was over forty-five minutes later that lie came shuffling back. He had been sleeping in his bath!

Captain Hewlett dined with us this evening. After the food of camp, Mrs. Ulyate's freshly baked bread tasted like cake, and the fish brought down late this afternoon by airplane from Lake Victoria was all that we needed to spell feast.

The dining-room at the New Arusha Hotel is unique. From the wainscoting to the ceiling the walls are covered with paintings of the Great Rift Valley. Not only were all the familiar peaks and lakes spread out before us, but tucked away, grazing on mimosa trees, was the very group of giraffe we always saw up near the Hot Springs, the herd of impala that lived near our camp, the crotchety old rhino that we bumped into so often, the hippos that wallowed in the papyrus swamp, the lions that we heard every night. The escarpment, the baobab trees, the Masai manyattas - all were there. It was a picture map of the entire district.

Mrs. Ulyate told me that a stranger, hungry and poorly shod, blew in one day. He needed help but had no money. He said he could paint; so Mr. Ulyate made a drawing of the Great Rift Valley, and he followed it.

Mrs. Ulyate showed me some amusing native carvings, one a crocodile swallowing a native woman, feet first, who had slipped down the beast's throat to her waist. Judging from the squirming attitude of the crocodile, it was hard work, but the expression on the woman's face depicted only resignation.

There were also delightful carvings of various wild animals, grotesquely illustrating what to the native's mind were the most dangerous attributes of the different animals. Then there were strange little black figures, some quite terrifying in appearance, therefore devils; others pleasing, so presumably gods.

Captain Hewlett told me of a model of a biplane about three feet long that a native, after seeing- his first airplane, carved from a single section of the trunk of a tree. It shows the four engines in the front, the two wings on either side, the great wheels, and carries the streamline design of the body, even to a perfect tail.

Extract ID: 4528

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Page Number: 501
Extract Date: 1937

1937 New Arusha Hotel

Extract ID: 4478

See also

Allen, John Richard Down Memory Lane in Tanganyika
Page Number: 41
Extract Date: 1939

Arusha

Arusha was like a tonic. Warm days, cool nights and living in an hotel, the New Arusha Hotel, where the meals were excellent and ridiculously cheap at shs. 3. 00 per day for breakfast. lunch, tea and dinner! The propietor's good deed towards the 'War Effort'. He also made available for our use (the 7 BNCOs), a large empty room which accommodated all our campbeds and kit. The Army paid for that. Bar sales shot up, no doubt off-setting the cheap meals? At this point another Sgt joined us from the Service Corps, a mechanic, who could carry on where I left off. The 'heap' I drove for 150 miles did, in fact, have a cracked cylinder-head. And the mystery of the missing Transport Officer; he was abandoned in Dodoma suffering from an attack of malaria!

I must digress for a while. Practically all the German nationals in the Territory were collected from here, there and everywhere as soon as war was declared. The number probably totaling 3,000 plus but where they were all interned prior to their evacuation to South Africa I cannot recollect. Their homes, estates, businesses etc, had to be abandoned and were left in the care of a newly formed Department, The Custodian of Enemy Property, thus creating plenty of employment for the older generation. Chaos reigned for a while but gradually sanity was restored. One shining example was in Arusha. The Ford Motor Co's agent was a German firm stocking a vast amount of spare parts dating from the present day back to 1930. With their German masters gone the Asian clerks were a little out of their depth when it came to searching for individual vehicle parts, consequently, one invariably had to go behind the counter, into the parts department, to find the necessary spare part(s) required.

I haven’t mentioned my brother for some considerable time! A month or two before hostilities commenced he went on six months leave to the UK and was therefore 'trapped', not knowing when he would be returning due to the unpredictable state of the shipping movements.

Back to Arusha. The township is situated on the lower slopes of an extinct volcano, Mt. Meru, which is 14,000 plus feet above sea level at the peak. In the European sector are well kept gardens with a profusion of flowers, and a whole variety of vegetables in the kitchen gardens . Plenty of beer in the two hotels. There was also a Chemists shop, most unusual in 'up-country' towns.

Extract ID: 5712

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504g

Beautiful gardens

Grandfather Ray’s other daughter and her husband Ossie Barratt were to help with the management and running of the New Arusha Hotel during the latter half of the 30,s and into the 40,s

Granny Anne and daughter Thora developed the outstanding beautiful gardens of the hotel on completion of the building phase during the 30,s. Many of the plants came from the Ammani Research station located in the Usambara Mts near Tanga. I would often see Granny Anne and Thora working in that garden. A vivid recollection of that period was the number of fiery ants in the garden. Always getting bitten by them. Hop scotch was the name of the game.

Extract ID: 4748

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504h
Extract Date: 1940's

Memories of the New Arusha Hotel

My memories of the New Arusha Hotel were;

A lounge over looking a sunking dinning room. Above the lounge was my Grand parents accommodation, Either side of the lounge and in the dinning room were placed original photographs taken by wild life naturalist Cherry Kearton. The first ever Flash light photographs depicting a Lion and Rhino were amongst the photographs displayed there.

The dinning room walls had a painting of the whole of the East African valley designed by Grand father Ray and painted by a down and out painter looking for work. It was commissioned during the depression years.

The verandah of the hotel over looked the car park. Often seen Safari Trucks and farmers vehicles parked outside especially during lunch times. Wednesdays were farmer’s Market days when produce was laid out on tables to be sold. In those days The New Arusha Hotel was always a hive of activity.

Outside the Hotel was a signed board marking the centre of the East African Territories and half way between Cape to Cairo.

A very large wild fig tree branch taken from Meru Estate was planted on the corner of the Hotel. It grew into an enormous tree.

The Hotel was sold to the African Tours and Hotel Group in 1947. Ray and Anne Ulyate moved to the Lion Cub Hotel to be with my Mother. Grand father was suffering from ill health at the time and was to pass away in 1948

Extract ID: 4749

See also

Allen, John Richard Down Memory Lane in Tanganyika
Page Number: 57
Extract Date: 1940 Oct

On Leave - retuning north

There was the question of petrol too, a commodity strictly rationed, However, that did not impose too great a problem! The dear lady behind the desk in the Rationing Office, whom I knew, very kindly allowed me 12 gallons for the holiday, and, since I would be traveling back to Nairobi, passing through Dodoma at an unsociable hour, issued me with coupons for enough fuel to reach Arusha where I could collect more for the final leg to Nairobi.

The few days relaxation soon petered out but it was a change from army routine, although that couldn't be ruled out completely as there was a constant flow of Army personnel calling in at the hotel enroute North or South , whose requirements had to be catered for with the emphasis on food and drink. The latter other than tea or coffee having to be dispensed by me at times. Who's grumbling.¬

Departure day came along too quickly as there were two jobs I had to complete which would take about four hours. That lot finished I got away soon after 1.00 pm making for Kondoa Irangi, 324 miles away to the north, where there was a Rest House (of sorts) to spend the night? With the intention of driving the 360 miles to Nairobi the following day: But the best made plans go wrong! I reached Dodoma 6.00 pm-ish, filled up the car with petrol and, feeling rather thirsty, went along to the Hickson-Wood house to scrounge a cup of tea. That was where the itinery went wrong? Staying with the H-Ws was a Sao Hill neighbour Esme Creswell, and young son aged 5 - 6 yrs, looking for a lift to Nairobi to join her husband, a Captain in one of the KAR. Battalions stationed there.

With an almost empty car I agreed to take them, with the proviso that they would have to be prepared to travel another 100 miles on to Kondoa and spend the night in an awful four-roomed Government Rest House containing a bed with a terrible mattress, a table and couple of chairs! That information had been passed on to me by someone who knew the place, and I found I was not wrong! Poor Esme was in a bit of a quandary as she didn’t have any bedding, only two cases full of clothes. I had my bedding roll and whilst at home I'd knocked up a 'chop' box and stocked it with the bare necessities of life to last a day or two. So that didn't pose any great problem. Kathy H-W. offered to lend Esme two blankets which were gratefully accepted. After tea and a snack we set off on the two hour drive to Kondoa. After covering something like 25 miles it was all too obvious the young lad suffered from car-sickness! Mopping up operations took time and thereafter I had to adjust my driving accordingly hoping it would prevent further mishaps, but there were two more. So instead of the journey taking two hours it was more like three.

The Rest House was rather grotty, but did boast of a caretaker who managed to provide water, both hot and cold! The building contained four rooms with cement floors. The walls were constructed with sun-dried mud bricks and a corrugated iron roof over the lot. A coat of whitewash, inside and out, would have made a great improvement. However, we had to sort ourselves out. One room contained a bed and mattress, another room a table and three rickety chairs and the other two empty. So, into one of them went the mattress, dumped on the floor for Esme and son with the two borrowed blankets (I often wondered whether they were returned?). My bedding roll went on the bedstead, not quite as hard as the floor, and since I had a pair of pillows the lady was in luck. She had one of them. Lighting was by torchlight! A good lesson in 'How to be uncomfortable on safari'. For supper a Cream Cracker or two washed down with 'pop', and so to bed.

Next morning the caretaker produced a wash basin, a most useful piece of equipment, and better still, hot water for washing ourselves in, which also gave Esme a chance to clean up the young lad after the previous night's ordeal.

The idea of driving through to Nairobi in the one day had to be abandoned due to 'junior' (I cannot remember his name) being such a poor traveler, so there was no violent rush to leave Kondoa as our next night stop would be Arusha, a distance of 175 miles, which, on this occasion, would take about five hours.

We arrived there mid afternoon, clocked in at the hotel, and after a few cups of tea we retired to our respective rooms where I enjoyed a long soak in the bath followed by a useful nap before climbing into a clean uniform etc. and making my way to see what the Bar had to offer. But not before going to a nearby shop to invest in a large Thermos flask! Esme eventually appeared for a 'quickie' before dinner, after having spent most of her time attending to the domestic chores involved when traveling around with a young child. Incidentally, he survived the day's journey without any trouble. Thank heaven.

Nairobi next. 184 miles, which would take five hours. By the time I'd collected my petrol coupons, filled up the tank, and Esme had sent a telegram off to her husband, Richard, saying that she would, hopefully, be at the New Stanley Hotel anytime after 3.00 pm it was 10 am.

The journey to Nairobi was uneventful. A stop enroute to look at a few giraffe browsing happily on the roadside trees and time to devour our sandwiches the Arusha Hotel had prepared for us. The Thermos flask I bought yesterday was duly christened too, and poured a very refreshing cup of tea!

Extract ID: 5713

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Bob Walker
Page Number: 504h
Extract Date: 1940's

Memories of the New Arusha Hotel

My memories of the New Arusha Hotel were;

A lounge over looking a sunking dinning room. Above the lounge was my Grand parents accommodation, Either side of the lounge and in the dinning room were placed original photographs taken by wild life naturalist Cherry Kearton. The first ever Flash light photographs depicting a Lion and Rhino were amongst the photographs displayed there.

The dinning room walls had a painting of the whole of the East African valley designed by Grand father Ray and painted by a down and out painter looking for work. It was commissioned during the depression years.

The verandah of the hotel over looked the car park. Often seen Safari Trucks and farmers vehicles parked outside especially during lunch times. Wednesdays were farmer’s Market days when produce was laid out on tables to be sold. In those days The New Arusha Hotel was always a hive of activity.

Outside the Hotel was a signed board marking the centre of the East African Territories and half way between Cape to Cairo.

A very large wild fig tree branch taken from Meru Estate was planted on the corner of the Hotel. It grew into an enormous tree.

The Hotel was sold to the African Tours and Hotel Group in 1947. Ray and Anne Ulyate moved to the Lion Cub Hotel to be with my Mother. Grand father was suffering from ill health at the time and was to pass away in 1948

Extract ID: 4749

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: David Hamilton
Page Number: 2008 05 16
Extract Date: 1947-1950

Arusha 1947-1950

I was intrequed to read about Gladys Rydon as my late father, Ronnie Hamilton, was her business partner and managed Ol Kokola estate on the slopes of Mt Meru between 1947-1950, when he left to take up a job in the growing sisal industry further 'up the line'.

My mother, Olivia, can clearly remember staying at Gladys' lovely home on lake Diluti and told me that her son David was a very talented artist. David lived in separate house on the estate where he had his studio.

My Ma was also the receptionist at the 'New Arusha' for a short time and had the nickname 'The Honeypot' for reasons that have never been made clear to me!

Ronnie was an ex-army major (Kings 4th, Burma and India) and chose Tanganyika after he was sent to train KAR troops in jungle warfare. I think he thought he had died and gone straight to heaven! The farm was situated at 7,500ft and the only transport that could get up there was Dad's US Army Jeep and his horses!

I was born in the European hospital in Arusha in 1948 and we went on to live near Voi and later near Korogwe, when I went to school up at Lushoto.

Of course Arusha was not Arusha without it's share of scandal and Ma came to stay with the Swaffin's as she was running away from her first husband, Eric Hunt! I imagine she and Dad met at the New Arusha and the rest, as they say, was history!!!

I last visited Arusha in 2004 when I climbed Kilimanjaro. The place was very changed and had lost its charm, but I hope to go back again within 2 years.

Kind regards, David Hamilton

Extract ID: 5658

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Page Number: 502
Extract Date: 1953

'Piece of History' to vanish

The news that the New Arusha Hotel is to be rebuilt has met with a certain sadness as well as pleasure.

Of course, the town is pleased that the African Tours and Hotels Ltd. has so much faith in the future of the tourist industry that it is willing to go on with the plans to rebuild the hotel and spend somewhere in the region of £110,000 in the process.

The sadness comes with the disappearance of a "piece of history". How changed life will be when it is no longer possible to sit on the verandah of the "New A" and watch the world go by as one waits for a friend or a bus or just waits!

Royal Reception

Thousands of tourists and V.I.P.'s have passed through the New Arusha and hundreds of dances and dinners have been held there. The first function held in fact took place before it was opened - a dance and reception for the Prince of Wales in December, 1927, the hotel being officially opened the following January.

The New owner was Mr. K.V. Painter an American who leased it to Mr Ray Ulyate. The name New Arusha arose because there had already been an Arusha Hotel across the road owned and run by Jane and Goodall Bloom.

Mr Ulyate started what is believed to be the first safaris by camera at the hotel when he formed his Tanganyika big game and tourist organisation, offereing a seven-day photographic safari in the Serengeti.

Extract ID: 4479

See also

Sadleir, Randal Tanzania, Journey to Republic
Page Number: 204a
Extract Date: 1957

Arusha's two famous hotels

Also in the main street were Arusha's two famous hotels.

The New Arusha displayed a board announcing that it was exactly midway between Cape Town and Cairo, and the Safari Hotel boasted an unusual copper topped bar to which a baby elephant had been led in for a drink in a recent Hollywood film Hatari (Danger). Mount Meru overlooked the pretty garden town beyond the golf course and the main road to Nairobi to the north.

The streets in the residential areas were lined with purple jacarandas and the well kept gardens displayed a profusion of tropical zinnias, petunias and marigolds mixed with the roses, hollyhocks, ferns and carnations of England. At 5000 feet above sea level, the climate was perfect after the sultry heat of the coast and the early mornings were a delight with dew-dappled lawns, mists and a nip in the air, mingled with the fragrant scent of cedar hedges.

Extract ID: 4385

See also

Duncan, Brian Arusha Photographs
Extract Author: Brian Duncan
Page Number: 11a
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Arusha Hotel Sign

The hotel was the best place for the local social scene (hosting St Andrews night & Burns nights). African waiters wore white tunics with a red fez hats (aka Tommy Cooper).

Extract ID: 5288

See also

Duncan, Brian Arusha Photographs
Extract Author: Brian Duncan
Page Number: 11b
Extract Date: 1958-1962

Arusha Hotel Sign

The hotel was the best place for the local social scene (hosting St Andrews night & Burns nights). African waiters wore white tunics with a red fez hats (aka Tommy Cooper).

Extract ID: 5289

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 203b
Extract Date: 1960

Safari office

In Arusha, Russell's safari office was in the lobby of the New Arusha Hotel. In those days, in front of the hotel there was a sign:

THIS SPOT IS EXACTLY HALF WAY BETWEEN THE CAPE AND CAIRO AND THE EXACT CENTER OF KENYA, UGANDA, AND TANGANYIKA

Extract ID: 3822

See also

Herne, Brian White Hunters: The golden age of African Safaris
Page Number: 204a
Extract Date: 1960~

Stan Lawrence-Brown had his office in the Safari Hotel

Stan Lawrence-Brown had his office in the Safari Hotel one hundred yards up the street from his rival, Russell Douglas. The Safari Hotel was newer, and probably fancier than the New Arusha, but it did not have the trout river frontage, lovely grounds, or the Old World charm of its rival. The Safari was a four-story rectangular box built of stone and concrete, and in its time the interior was comfortably appointed with lofty rooms. Even today, while the Safari has sunk into obscurity with the advent of newer hotels, one cannot help but notice that this large hotel has all its plumbing on the exterior of the structure, a result of an oversight by the contractors, who had forgotten to include plumbing. The hotel was owned by two aristocratic English sisters, Gladys and Margot Rydon. Both women owned prosperous coffee estates. Gladys lived in a magnificent mansion overlooking a mysterious crater lake called Duluti, seven miles east of Arusha. Margot's son, David, was killed by a buffalo near Arusha in 1964.

Extract ID: 3862

See also

Conner, Shaun Memories of Colonel T.S.Conner DSO KPM
Page Number: 13

photo of Arusha with a good view of the New Arusha Hotel in the early 60's

Extract ID: 5534

See also

Smith, Anthony Throw out two hands
Page Number: 119
Extract Date: 1962

the Great North Road into Arusha

.. .. we sped along the Great North Road into Arusha in fine fashion.

Coffee, as is well known, does wonders to the bloodstream. It turns haggard, droop-eyed, grey-faced individuals into reasonable humans once again. It also makes them think that a wash and a shave would be quite in order, and that a hot breakfast would not be resisted unduly. The New Arusha Hotel is used to this sort of thing. Filthy vagabonds arrive from all parts of the countryside, sign their muddy names in the book, disappear for an hour or so, and arrange a metamorphosis. As caterpillars become butterflies, so were we a markedly changed group as we strode out into the town to go about our business.

There was much to be done. The Gipsy was put in the hands of the Galley and Roberts garage. Barclays Bank was visited. Immense amounts of food were bought from the Fatehali Dhala store. Photographic arrangements were made with Malde's Camera Shop. Peter Champney, the local information officer, was visited, for he was to be of considerable value in liaising with the outside world. Permission was sought from John Owen, director of the Tanganyika National Parks, to camp in them.

Extract ID: 3737

See also

Reuter, Henry J. Official Touring Guide to East Africa: 1967 International Travel Year
Page Number: 074a
Extract Date: 1967

New Arusha Hotel (advert)

Extract ID: 3469

See also

Reuter, Henry J. Official Touring Guide to East Africa: 1967 International Travel Year
Page Number: 153
Extract Date: 1967

New Arusha Hotel

ARUSHA:

NEW ARUSHA HOTEL, P.O. Box 88, Tel. Arusha 2042, Telegrams Centre.

Proprietors, New Arusha Hotels Ltd., Manager D. N. Jarman.

Tariff: Bed and breakfast with private bath, 60/- single; 100/- double.

Full Board per day with private bath, 80/- single, 150/- double.

Full Board per week with private bath, 507/- single; 893/- doubife.

Full Board per month with private bath, 1000/- single; 1800/- double.

Private suite, with bath, lounge and balcony, with breakfast, 200/- double.

Tariff for children: Reduction of 50% for children of 3 to 12 when sharing with parents.

Tariff for meals: Breakfast 7/-, lunch 15/-, dinner 15/-,

Accommodation available: 31 double and 36 single rooms all with private bath.

Amenities available: Tennis court, swimming pool, regular dances, a

banqueting hall, tours arranged to Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro Crater. Serengeti and all game parks in East Africa.

Amenities within reasonable distance: Golf course, fishing.

No servants' accommodation, but available nearby.

Dogs are accepted.

Petrol is available day and night opposite the hotel.

Extract ID: 1438

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Nicky Renouf
Page Number: 2007 01 19
Extract Date: 1970

Executive assistant manager at The New Arusha

I was executive assistant manager at The New Arusha , for about 10 months in 1970.

I worked for African Tours and Hotels, and spent the time there as there were problems (aren’t there always) with my Kenya Work Permit.

I was only 20/21 and fresh out of hotel college. The previous young expats had decided to leave (due to the hard conditions imposed on us) and disappeared overnight, their tickets being paid for by some guests.

The Hotel was being run in a largly despotic manner, by Tony O'Brian, known to all as Mkaki due to the highly starched safari gear he used to wear. He had the most sophisticated spy network , and knew exactly what we had been up to , almost before we did it!

He was an ex hunter, and well I remember shooting with him at West Kilimanjaro,Tony sitting on a shooting stick , quaffing from his hip flask at the same time as effortessly shooting large numbers of sand grouse.

We worked extremely hard, often from 7 am till 2 the next morning, and that included his hard working wife who was I believe called Phil.

There are any number of stories about my time there, when parts of the old building were still in use, greeting the King of Denmark, the tanzanite smuglers shooting at each other as they went round the roundabout.

Lots of stories, but not a place I recall as being the happiest posting of my career.

Nicky Renouf

Extract ID: 5185

external link

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: lute wa lutengano
Page Number: No. 00247c
Extract Date: November 23, 2002

Substitutes are Like a Tail Chasing Pup

"This is my bible," said Mzee Tony adding that he has been with the book since 1966. It was given to him by one George Dove of George Dove Safaris, a company, which had employed him as a clerk and barman first at Kimba Lodge in Ngorongoro and later at Ndutu Safari Lodge between 1966 and 1969.

Following that stint Tony resigned and came back to Arusha town where two years later in 1971 New Arusha Hotels Ltd employed him. Mzee Tony, who was born in Kilema on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro and reached 54 years on 2 October this year, is married (for the last 22 years) to Veneranda Lyimo with whom they have six children.

Extract ID: 3628

See also

Marsh, David Photos of Arusha
Page Number: 09
Extract Date: August 1994


Extract ID: 4067

See also

Marsh, David Photos of Arusha
Page Number: 10
Extract Date: August 1994


Extract ID: 4068

See also

Marsh, David Photos of Arusha
Page Number: 11
Extract Date: January 1997


Extract ID: 4069

See also

The starting point for the new face of Arusha
Page Number: 2
Extract Date: 2002

Discover Arusha Tours

Boyes’ description of the Boma 100 years ago is clearly over the top. But ironically, this whitewashed German fort, rehabilitated 1999 with Belgian aid, at the top of Boma road leading to the Clock Tower, is today becoming the starting point for the new face of Arusha. It is used as a centre for art and craft exhibitions, music festivals and drama.

Jan Mannaert, a Belgian former art history teacher, has responded to the town’s perpetual transition by establishing "Discover Arusha Tours" (tel: 0744 - 395430). These worthwhile tours begin at the Boma, the first stone building in the town.

Mannaert then takes the visitors to the roof of the New Safari Hotel where on a clear day they can see the town and Mount Meru. Then they are told the history of the Clock Tower. Religious temples and churches, historical buildings, the railway station, the Uhuru (freedom) and Askari (soldier)monuments, and the cemetery are all included.

The Boma houses a Belgian-run café called Via Via which serves soft drinks and meals. Inside the Boma there is also a museum. This is sadly empty at present, while staff vehicles parked on the forecourt leave ugly oil stains on the elegant brickwork, destroying the historic atmosphere.

Below the Boma are the town administration offices on the left and the Regional Administration on the right. Before the Clock Tower are airline offices (including Air Tanzania), two other meeting places (Café bamboo and Jambo Coffee house), Kase Bookshop, the Tanzanian Tourist Board, tour operators and curio shops.

On the way down Boma Road on the right hand side is the New Safari Hotel and just beyond the Clock Tower to the left is the New Arusha Hotel. Both have deteriorated badly. The New Safari Hotel has been taken over by the Lutheran Church, and the once world famous copper bar is now closed in conformity with temperance. The New Arusha Hotel is badly in need of refurbishment.

To the right of the Clock Tower on Uhuru Road there are women selling Maasai beads on the pavement. Also on Uhuru Road is Lookmanji Curio Shop which, along with The Craft Shop on adjoining Goliondoi Road, is recommended. If you are looking for something authentic from the area, there are Maasai bead ornaments and local batik.

Extract ID: 3432

external link

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: lute wa lutengano
Page Number: No. 00247a
Extract Date: November 23, 2002

Substitutes are Like a Tail Chasing Pup

When I first set foot in this northern Tanzania town, that is way back in the mid 80s, my favourite drinking joints were the Copper bar at the historical New Safari Hotel and The Tavern at the panoramic New Arusha Hotel.

The Copper Bar had a set up based on a theme of the famous John Wayne film, Hatari. It so happens that the famous film star once stayed at the Safari Hotel when making that movie. The Tavern, located on the basement overlooking the beautiful gardens, used to celebrate the old Arusha socialites. This you could tell by the names inscribed on the beer mugs hanging behind the bar man. They were a "who is who" list of the colonial and early independence history of Arusha.

By the time I arrived in Arusha the two bars were catering for different classes of people. The Copper was popular with the town's young professionals while the Tavern was patronised by the elderly and rich. It goes without saying that comparatively more cocktails and hard stuff were consumed at The Tavern. That was when Tony came into the picture. He was The Tavern bar's cocktail wizard. Always pleasant and advising the client accordingly what poison was good for him or her when feeling or in that mood or the other. Surely, Tony was the soul of the bar.

The Copper and The Tavern are no longer there. I am reliably informed though that a new pub, appropriately named Hatari is in the pipeline at the newly renovated New Arusha Hotel. I am told it will be a thematic bar, (based on the same Hatari film) and better organised than the Copper and The Tavern bars. But this is another story all together.

Extract ID: 3626

external link

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: staff writers
Page Number: 258
Extract Date: 22 Feb 2003

The Arusha Hotel: The legend continues

Once upon a time (early 1900's to be precise) there was a New Arusha Hotel. This apparently, was the one and only hotel in Arusha then a little township.

The hotel was later purchased by an American coffee farmer called ‘Kenyon Painter’ in 1927.

The hotel became a favourite home to many travelers on their journey from Cape Town to Cairo city and vice versa.

Last weekend, the mayor for Arusha; Paul Lotta Laizer was among the distinguished guests to witness the re-opening of the legendary hotel.

Formerly known as the New Arusha Hotel, The outfit has recently undergone extensive renovation and refurbishment that transformed it into the first ever Five (5) Star hotel in town.

Set in beautifully landscaped gardens with all the amenities and luxury for the discerning traveler. The tropical gardens are home to many birds and exotic plants. An ideal setting for wedding receptions and outdoor functions. You can also choose to just relax and enjoy the attentive service by the heated pool.

The Arusha Hotel has 65 rooms including 2 suites, 6 deluxe rooms, 34 executive rooms and 23 twins. Elegantly furnished with en-suite bathrooms equipped with bathroom amenities and tea and coffee making facilities. Each room is fitted with satellite television with a selection of channels, hair dryer and an electronic safe. All rooms have direct phones and a data port for computers for Internet access.

Buffet style breakfast and dinners with appetizing, contemporary, modern cuisine, is prepared from the "freshest produces, flavored and garnished using only the highest quality".

You can also take an aromatic tour an experience the a la carte menu.

The dining experience would be incomplete without aromatic coffees, home made desserts, followed by warm cognacs and brandy’s in "Hatari" Tavern (named after John Wayne’s Oscar winning movie, filmed here in 1962). John Wayne, popularly known as Duke, to his friends, together with Elsa Martinelli and the rest of the cast, were frequent visitors to the hotel. Hatari has a large television screen for guests to watch the latest sporting events and news, made complete with the relaxed informal and comfortable homely surroundings. Lunch in Hatari for the ‘businessmen lunch’ is not to be missed. Quick, tasty, freshly made food prepared while you wait.

On the opening day of Saturday the 15th of February, newly opened; The Arusha hotel, was glad to welcome its first clients in the persons of Larcan Lucey and Elizabeth Nou who signed in the Hotel’s oldest register book.

Sales and marketing manager; Veronicah Hawkins displayed the register book which was first signed on the 10th of October 1935 and last signed on the 29th of march 1944, before being scribbled on by the lucky two pioneer 5 star customers last weekend.

The Arusha hotel is owned by the New Arusha Hotels Limited, under the general manager; Ian Shandler.

Oh! And by the way, the hotel is situated half way between Cape town and Cairo city just in case you happened to be wondering as what exactly could the hotel’s compass emblem mean.

Extract ID: 3913

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Marion Langham
Page Number: 200
Extract Date: 22 June 2003

Ray Ulyate

I was delighted to find this site as Ray Ulyate was my Grandfather. My mother bought the New Arusha Hotel from my Grandfather and we lived there until 1947 when my parents sold the hotel and moved to a farm called Gararagua at Sanya Juu.

One of Ray's sons is still alive he lives in South Africa.

Kind regards

Marion

Lady Langham

nee Barratt

Dear Marion

Thank you so much for your comments about the web site. I hope you will continue to find things there that interest you, just as they do me.

I've just returned from a trip to Arusha, notable for several things.

One was a visit to the rebuilt New Arusha Hotel. Sadly now it looks much like any other hotel in the world, with it's open polished lobby, and function rooms. The outside, especially away from the street, is more interesting, and the gardens still have some charm. Do you remember it all?

I met a South African Lady who is a manager from the hotel chain which now own/run it, and she had little interest in it's history, although there were two small framed pictures in the lobby (both of which are on my web site).

But I did meet others who were interested in the history of the New Arusha Hotel, and we had fun trying to work out when it may have been built - and by whom. Just about everything I know is on the web site, so I wont repeat it.

Also in Arusha I stayed with someone whose father is at Kifafu Farm, also in Sanya Juu. I don't know how long he's been there, but have emailed to find out more.

I wonder if you have more information about the origins of the Hotel, and how and when your grandfather came to run it.

I'd be grateful for any information you are able to find for me. Obviously I'd like to put as much as possible on the web, but if there is anything you would prefer was not published, do let me know and I'll respect the request.

One of our mysteries is to understand more about a man called Kenyon Painter. One source implies that he "built" the hotel - he certainly invested a lot in the area. On this trip I discovered a stained glass window to his memory in the Anglican Church. Does the name mean anything to you?

And lastly, a few days before your email I heard from a Marjorie Borissow (now in Australia) who was at Arusha School from 1959 - 1965. She says that "My grandparents and family used to own the New Arusha Hotel, and the Lion Cub Hotel in Moshi." Are you all part of the same large family?

Thanks again for your feedback, and I look forward to any more information that you can offer.

With best wishes

David

David Marsh

www.nTZ.info for information about Northern Tanzania

Harwell, England

Extract ID: 4335

See also

Arusha Times
Extract Author: June Thomas
Page Number: 439
Extract Date: 30 Sep 2006

I have first hand account of history of New Arusha Hotel

Dear Sirs,

I have just come across your articles written last year (24 Sept 2005) regarding a Dana Bloom from Canada - and the debate regarding the New Arusha Hotel.

My father - Ted Ulyate (now age 89) - son of Raymond Ulyate is very much alive - and if people are really interested in the history of the New Arusha Hotel Dad can give first hand account of events and clear up any problem areas.

By the way - as a child I knew Polly Bloom really well - and he and his family were friends of my parents - I also remember the name of Judah Bloom - both Mum and Dad still speak of the family.

My mother was the sister of the Arusha School (Kay Ulyate) and my father (Ted Ulyate) had a farm out at Essimingor and I am assumed that the luncheon parties mentioned in Marsh, R.J. and E.P Safari Diaries 1953-7 was in fact lunches as my parents farm.

If anyone would like to contact my parents please let me know and I would gladly put you in contact.

Kind regards

June Thomas (nee Ulyate)

Extract ID: 5160

See also

nTZ Feedback
Extract Author: Hazel Redgrave
Page Number: 2007 11 10

New Arusha Hotel - item on eBay

Hello David, fascinating to read your pages, thank you for them. Just to let you know that there is an interesting item on eBay for the next three days - a lovely luggage label for the New Arusha Hotel. Just put Arusha in the subject box. It's really clear and looks very clean - you might just want to glance at it for interest.

I was at Kongwa, Mkwaya and Nachingwea from 1949-1957 - I was Hazel Miller then. Happy days! Kind regards, Hazel.

Extract ID: 5503

See also

Ulyate Family Personal Communications
Extract Author: Margaret Thompson
Page Number: 401
Extract Date: 2007 02 18

Margaret Thompson nee Barratt Oldest of Thora's Children

I was interested to read Marjories recollections, I haven't been able to access this site for some time due to isp probs'

Ted's Name was Winton not William

The Hotel was built an owned by Painters who sold it on to Grandfather.

Ray was the First White Hunter to put down his gun and run hunting with Camera Safaris in East Africa. He would pick up his clients from Dar es Salaam, drive up through the Serengetti and back through Arusha finally to Mombasa where they would go aboard their ship for travel to Europe. Mostly the British India Line, sometimes the Union Castle Lines, but all before air travel.

He took Roosevelt on at least one safari

His movies won awards at the Edinburgh Festival just before the second world war broke out, the film was allegedly lost at sea although some shots were later recognised as being from that film.

Ray was also a brilliant experimental cook, he loved to try out pickles etc.

He had a wonderful imagination and I own the Mural that he had painted by Lone Oak (a tramp who walked from Cape to Cairo and Cairo to the Cape - he would be worth investigating as he was a brilliant Painter and left a legacy of beautiful murals on many homes in the Ol Donyo Sambu area)

The Mural I own depicts the Northern Province of Tanganyika as seen from 20,ooo feet up, drawn & painted just after ww1, it is remarkably accurate and shows what a detailed knowledge grandpa had of the district.

I am the oldest of Thora & Oswald Barrat's Children.

Bryn Jones was the Minister for the Church of England in Arusha, used to wear football shorts and boots under his cassock at church

Extract ID: 5178
www.nTZ.info