Bill Morgan

Arusha School Tteacher, father of "Corky"

Name ID 2478

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Extract Author: Mark Morgan Mark Morgan
Page Number: 2004 02 21
Extract Date: 1947-1955

Bill Morgan was a master at the school

I have just come across this interesting site, while gathering information for a return visit to Arusha later in the Year.

I was very pleased to read the history of Arusha School as my farther, Bill Morgan was a master at the school from about 1947-1955 (I think those dates are right) He was teaching there before the war and then returned after.

I have three brothers we where all born in Arusha and later moved with dad when he went to Oyester-Bay School in Dar, and then later to Mbeya. My elder brother was then a boarder at Arusha before we all where sent to school in the uk.

It was good to see photos of Bryn Jones,a great family friend ( he was kind enough to marry both my self and both of my brothers) he sadly died several years ago, but my mother still keep in contact with his widow.

Seeing the photo of the late Princess Margaret's visit to the school. I was actually in the photo( the top of my head) we have a copy in the family album, and the photo of my farther being presented had pride of place on my grandmothers T.V

We have many photos of the school, and activites going on, which you would be quite welcome to to put on the site.

I am looking forward to my visit in September but hope that the School and Town have not changed to much, but it is nearly 50 years since I was last there.

Will give the site address to my brothers so they can have a look

Mark Morgan

Thanks for your feedback and interesting email. Sorry for the delay in replying.

I received, at about the same time, an email from Andrew Hannah, at the school from 1957-60, although he had brothers there before him, and he lists Morgan as one of the teachers he remembers. Iíll put his, and your, emails up on the web site at the next update.

I think I was just out of the shot of Princess M - my duty was to hold the door open for her as she came in. Iíve got lots of other stuff about her visit, which I havenít yet had time to publish on the site.

But if you have photos and other anecdotes, Iíd welcome copies for inclusion.

You will greatly enjoy revisiting Arusha. Itís changed much in the last ten years or so since Iíve been going back. From being a shabby backwater, itís now a vibrant small town, and slowly cleaning itself up. However, flying over it can be horrific in that it reveals a huge shanty town, just as poor as any slum in Nairobi or Johannesburg, but totally hidden from the main tourist throughways.

I called in on the school last May, and found one teacher very happy to show me round (and the tortoise is still there). The buildings are nearly all the same. The roofs have reverted from tiles to bati sheets. The dining hall still has the same long tables and sideboards, and the trophy boards on the wall. But whereas there were less then 300 pupils in the 50ís there are now 1200.

The headmaster was very busy, but pleased to see me (I think).

Do tell me more about your trip - have you allowed time to explore Arusha, and a guide to take you round. Most of them just want to get out of town as fast as possible and get you out to see the game. Where will you be staying?

Apart from the obvious risks, I felt I could walk around the main part of the town with my eyeís shut. All the road layouts are still the same, and many of the buildings are unchanged. Youíll be going round saying, Ah, I remember that.

Back in 1994 we found the old maternity ward in the Arusha Hospital where my brother was born - and maybe you.

The photo I took of it (http://www.ntz.info/gen/n00025.html#04073 ) appeared on the BBC web site recently - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3094543.stm but they claimed that it was obtained from a press agency in Dar es Salaam!

I could go on . . .

Hope to hear more from you.

 

Extract ID: 4703

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Extract Author: Richard Allen
Page Number: 2008 03 23
Extract Date: 1950-61

11 years of my life in Northern Tanganyika

Having been born in Arusha in 1950 and living the next 11 years of my life in Northern Tanganyika I find the personal memories of others in your website interesting and fascinating.

Many thanks for your hard efforts.

My 11 years were spent, along with my family, in the villages of Kondoa, Babati and finally Biharamulo, West Lake Province. My memory of years isn't too bright but we lived in each location for approximately 3 years before moving on to the next, except Kondoa where my Father John 'Jack' Allen spent 2 tours.

My early education, along with my brothers David Allen the elder and Robert Allen the younger, was undertaken in the HRH Aga Khan School, Babati, where my Mother Marjorie Allen was the teacher and co-founder of the school. Brother David started at Mbeya School at some stage during this tour in Babati.

On moving to Biharamulo in 1958/59 my younger brother and I were sent to Mbeya School and David started at St Michaels, Iringa. I have many happy, and some more painful, memories of Mbeya. The House (Wallington) Matron living in her flat at the end of the dormitory, The fear of the House Masters flexible black rubber 'tacky', Mr Morgan (I think) running the Cub Scout pack. Birthday teas, Saturday letter writing home followed by a visit to the Tuck shop and a film in the afternoon, Sundays visit to the River Garden, and many more.

On my Mothers death I found that she had kept a large number of those Saturday letters home and amongst them was a sketch of the River Gardens as drawn by a not so budding artist. This last may be of help to Judith Anderson

On a different tack, before his death, my Father wrote part of his life story. The story begins in Notttingham, UK, and goes on to his move to Tanganyika in 1928, at 13 years old, with his parents to an estate in Sao Hill. It tracks his life in the nTZ area during the 30s to joining and leaving the East African Army between the years 39 - 42. Unfortunately he didn't have time to continue the story further.

I have now copied this story to PC along with photos taken at the time and would be happy to pass on a copy to you if it interests you.

By way of interest, Sao Hill is named after the estate my Grandfather named and ran and subsequently where he built the Highlands Hotel in said place.

Again many thanks for your informative and entertaining website.

Extract ID: 5602

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Extract Author: Christopher Nelson
Page Number: 2008 07 22
Extract Date: 1955

Christopher Nelson ~ Arusha School 1955

Thank you for organizing this site.

I was a student at Arusha School in l955 for the January term. Being the only American at the time, I was called Hank.

My family lived only 12 miles east of Arusha in the heart of Meru country on the old German Lutheran mission estate at Makumira, so I was a day student, often riding my bike home on the tarmac after hockey practise.

My father, Anton Nelson, a Californian, was hired by Meru Cooperative Union, a group of some 4000 African coffee growers. This unusual arrangement came about at the instigation of Kirilo Japhet, one of these Meru farmers. He is mentioned elsewhere on the site in connection with the Meru Lands Case. My father had met Kirilo and his lawyer Earle Seaton at the United Nations in New York City.

Our European neighbors were the two with homes on the rim of Lake Duluti crater, the Fosbrookes and Gladys Rydon, both mentioned elsewhere on this site. Gladys was an Australian coffee estate owner and her home in view of Mt. Meru was ringed with a most beautiful flower garden. I have a photo her pouring tea on the veranda. I remember one tea in which Kirilo was in attendance. Kirilo by that time had become a rising star on the political firmament in Tanganyika. Both these strong personalities were the epitome of gracious interaction.

At Arusha School I remember fellow students Ian Fosbrooke, John Coutividis, Mary Wechsler and her brother Stephan, all mentioned in the l955 school magazine lists.

It would be fun to see a list of teachers, some of whom I've forgotten names. There was 'Lanky' Johnson, Nature Study, Mr. Morgan, algebra, Mr. Jones, French (taught this American to say 'Yes, sir'), a lovely young lady in music class who taught us to sing 'The British Grenadiers'.

I took piano lessons from Mrs. Brewster and played in the end of term recital with Carolyn Pearson.

I was on top of Mt. Meru with Mr. Morgan and the other Arusha School children.

I was in Tanganyika for 7 years, before independence.

After Arusha School I was at American schools for missionary children.

Extract ID: 5805

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Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 22-23
Extract Date: 1957

My Favourite Animal ~ Meru Expedition

Meru Expedition

This year the Meru Expedition started on Saturday, 1st December. In all there were thirteen children and seven members of staff climbing.

The road to Olkokola was fairly good, although two lorries stuck in the mud a couple of times. At Olkokola we had our lunch which consisted of sandwiches, fruit and a cup of tea. We then left the Base Camp and made our way to the edge of the forest.

Our way through the Forest was very beautiful with large open green glades here and there. Several people saw a herd of about twenty or thirty Eland, and we also heard Colobus Monkeys. The trees were covered with old man's beard. The weather this year was absolutely wonderful and we could see for miles around us. Going up the Elephant Slide was very steep and slippery. After a short rest we set to work finding firewood for our fire. For supper we had tomato soup, sausages, fried steak and bread and butter. We then all gathered round the fire and passed our time singing songs. For some of us the night seemed endless, until, at last, at half past three we were woken and after folding our blankets and having coffee and Ryvita we set out at four o'clock to climb the rest of the mountain.

As dawn broke we separated into little groups, and we could see the shadow of Meru against the sky as the sun appeared. We now came to the sandy part which was the most difficult of all because it was very slippery. The early morning frost covered the ground and made our toes feel like ice blocks. About seven fortyfive we started climbing the rocks which was great fun. Underneath were blocks of ice, which were very refreshing to eat.

The first people to reach the top were Mr. Morgan and Jacqueline Hudson. About seven minutes later Theresa Rarogiewicz and Janet Simpson clambered up. The last party arrived at nearly half past ten. Most of us stayed at the top until five to eleven.

At eleven we all started charging down the mountain like a herd of elephants. We reached the camp at about half past twelve, where there was a meal waiting for us. At one o'clock we started on our way back through the Forest and arrived at the base camp at half past two We arrived at school at a quarter past six, much earlier than we were expected.

Valerie Ulyate 13 years

Extract ID: 5701

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Extract Author: Andy Hannah
Page Number: 2004 02 29
Extract Date: 1957 - 60

Andy Hannah - Arusha School - 1957 - 60

Thankyou very much for opening this site.

You are very welcome to publish all of the below.

I remember Martin, Mary, and Peter Davis quite well. I was in the year above Peter and below Mary. I remember dancing with Mary!!!

Name: Andy Hannah

Years at Arusha: 1957 - 60

Older brothers Lister, Tim, Dave, were also there before me.

Masters: Morgan, Hampshire, BL Jones, HA Jones, Lanky Johnston. Pop Hazel.

Matrons: Mrs Fisher (David Read's terrfying mother) (head matron), Mrs Birchman, Miss Balfour, Miss De Beer (also terrifying), Miss Bear, Miss Pollack, Miss Randall, Miss Morrell, Mrs Evans.

Teachers: Miss Ingles (gentle and fair), Miss Monroe (loud voice), Miss Elizabeth Gray (lots of fun), Miss Jenkins (Gypsy), Miss Lundy (spunk).

Friends: Peter Bird, Christopher Ronaldson, Roger Haggerty, Itzak Abramovici, Stewart Hammond, Ian Steer, Daniel Marjocki, David Spoors, Michael Carter, George Legnani, Adrian Van Schoor, William Power, Brenda Ulliat, Henrietta Shannahan, Pauline Shannahan, Yvonne Karafiat, Susan Hunt, Nida Mogelnikskii, and others (sorry if I've left anyone out).

(Sorry if I've spelt anyone's name wrong)

Comments:

Looking back, I think that Hampshire ran a pretty tight ship. I suspect that he also knew who the nice teachers were and who the not so nice, and arranged things so that we all had our fair share of both.

However, my principal memories are negative:

It was like a jail, and we were regimented a lot of the time.

There was always an anxiety that I'd do something wrong and get the tacky (or HA Jones' "persuader"). I didn't get punished that often, but half the time it was for an innocent absent-minded mistake.

My time in standard 3 was particularly unhappy because I was landed with a sociopathic dorm-leader.

Some of the female teachers went out of their way to make us feel small.

I think the most positive aspect was the friendships formed.

I would be delighted to get in contact with any of the above.

I live in Melbourne, Australia. I am married and have 4 kids (2 eldest have left home).

Great to hear from you, and thanks for your memories which I shall add to the web site when I next do an update.

You mention Mrs Fisher (David Read's terrfying mother)! I must tell that to David Read. I met him last October, and hope to see him again when I go back to Arusha at the end of May.

Your surname sent me back to my parentís archives, and Iíve found one slide of the Ball family, plus Timothy Hannah standing in the garden. Iím not sure if you have worked it out from the web site, that my father was the rector of Christ Church Arusha from 1953-57, and I seem to remember that we had various boys to tea on Sunday afternoons. Iíve been looking, but so far havenít had enough to time find anything more, but I seem to remember that your fatherís names was Wells or Welsley.

I really need to go back to my fathers diaries to check my memories, and I could well be confusing you all with another family. But I seem to remember also that your father was in London in the early 60ís and he took me to a rally in Methodist Central Hall, Westminster at which Dr Hastings Banda was speaking.

My slide scanner is on loan at the moment, but when I can Iíll see if I can send you a copy of Timothyís picture and any other pictures I might find in the meantime.

Iíve also got a couple of copies of the Arusha School Magazine, and see that in 1955 Timothy Hannah won a Standard I Form Prize!

Thank-you for your reply.

By the time I arrived at Arusha School, your family had left the vicarage, but I get the impression that both Tim and Dave spent a fair time at your house. In fact, I think it was your Mum who introduced meringues to our family - via Tim who insisted on our Mum trying to make them.

Yes, Dad's name was Wellesley, and he was working at the time as a medical missionary in Mvumi, near Dodoma.

Extract ID: 4975

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Extract Author: Warna Hewitt
Page Number: 2008 03 20
Extract Date: 1957 -61

Warna Hewitt Mbeya School 1957 -61

I was at Mbeya School late 50's early 60's and remember Mr Morgan, Miss Thompson (who I met in Brazil)but very little else. Would love to hear from anybody who has been there recently as my son is going there in July and would love to tell him the address and how to get there. I was in Stanley house and remember the long dining tables, you could only have 20 people to your birthday party, and also remember the man with the drum who let us know when it was dinner time. As I lived in Moshi and also Lindi, I used to have to fly to school, but remember that we were the last to arrive and the last to leave.

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Date: 20-Mar-2008

Extract ID: 5601

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Extract Author: Jackie Little
Page Number: 2007 07 07

I remember Mark Morgan at Mbeya School

Unbelievable - I remember Mark Morgan at Mbeya School,

Mr Morgan was headmaster and my sister (Kitty) also went there around 1958 (I was in Wallington, the red house). We watched old laurel and hardy films on a Saturday night as a treat and there were fancy dress parties at end of term.

I remember so much of Mbeya, even the food and the sick bay (huge jabs we used to have)! I would love to hear from anyone who went to Mbeya, Turi or Kenya High School - I have quite a lot of pics of Mbeya - remember so many names still! Great times growing up in East Africa in the '50s/60s!

Extract ID: 5421

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Extract Author: Victoria Brennan
Page Number: 2008 04 14

Victoria Brennan (nee Butler) Mbeya school Jan 1961-July 1963

I started at Mbeya School Jan 1961, the headmaster was Mr Morgan. I was in Stanley House and remember being able to climb the Fir trees around the sports field, the swimming pool being built, picking up litter before the Saturday evening films, the drummer annoucing mealtimes, shoe cleaning on the grass in front of the dorms, and being taken to see the Walt Disney film Sleeping Beauty in Mbeya. The huge bonfires for Guy Fawkes across the stream, and the Kite making competition and the three horned chameleons. The awful TAB injections and the fancy dress party at the end of the year. Saturday evening Scottish dancing(being wisked through the Dashing white Sargeant with Mr Morgan) and the yearly House sing competition with it English Country songs.

The school closed down July 1963 and we were incorporated into Arusha School for the last term of the year.

I was born in Mahenge and we had to pick up the bus at the Mikumi stop. There were two bus loads of children from Dar and Morogoro and we overnighted at Iringa, girls in the White Horse Inn and boys in the Railway Hotel, this was reversed on the way out, Later when the numbers had dropped we all stayed at the railway hotel. One term the bridge on the Iringa road washed away, so we were bussed up to Itigi, overnight, to catch the train. My sister Judith joined me at the end of 1961 and was the smallest person at school and we were known as Big Butler and little Butler.

I am now fascinated by the curiously dated slang that we used and never came across at any of the other boarding schools I attended. Bosch for rubbish and the use of surnames only.

Thankyou for the interesting Website. I don't recognise any names but would love to hear from anyone who was at school with me.

Extract ID: 5625
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