Carolyn Pearson

Name ID 489

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Extract Author: Christopher Nelson
Page Number: 2008 07 22
Extract Date: 1955

Christopher Nelson ~ Arusha School 1955

Thank you for organizing this site.

I was a student at Arusha School in l955 for the January term. Being the only American at the time, I was called Hank.

My family lived only 12 miles east of Arusha in the heart of Meru country on the old German Lutheran mission estate at Makumira, so I was a day student, often riding my bike home on the tarmac after hockey practise.

My father, Anton Nelson, a Californian, was hired by Meru Cooperative Union, a group of some 4000 African coffee growers. This unusual arrangement came about at the instigation of Kirilo Japhet, one of these Meru farmers. He is mentioned elsewhere on the site in connection with the Meru Lands Case. My father had met Kirilo and his lawyer Earle Seaton at the United Nations in New York City.

Our European neighbors were the two with homes on the rim of Lake Duluti crater, the Fosbrookes and Gladys Rydon, both mentioned elsewhere on this site. Gladys was an Australian coffee estate owner and her home in view of Mt. Meru was ringed with a most beautiful flower garden. I have a photo her pouring tea on the veranda. I remember one tea in which Kirilo was in attendance. Kirilo by that time had become a rising star on the political firmament in Tanganyika. Both these strong personalities were the epitome of gracious interaction.

At Arusha School I remember fellow students Ian Fosbrooke, John Coutividis, Mary Wechsler and her brother Stephan, all mentioned in the l955 school magazine lists.

It would be fun to see a list of teachers, some of whom I've forgotten names. There was 'Lanky' Johnson, Nature Study, Mr. Morgan, algebra, Mr. Jones, French (taught this American to say 'Yes, sir'), a lovely young lady in music class who taught us to sing 'The British Grenadiers'.

I took piano lessons from Mrs. Brewster and played in the end of term recital with Carolyn Pearson.

I was on top of Mt. Meru with Mr. Morgan and the other Arusha School children.

I was in Tanganyika for 7 years, before independence.

After Arusha School I was at American schools for missionary children.

Extract ID: 5805

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 24-25
Extract Date: 1955

Custer's Last Stand ~ The Earth ~ All the Fun of the Fair ~ The Village Oasis

Extract ID: 5671

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 04-05
Extract Date: 1956

Charcoal Burner's Son ~ The Drinking Pool ~ Elocution Contest

The Charcoal Burner's Son

Characters:

The Princess Helen Speed

The Charcoal Burner's Son Melville Ueckermann

The Ogre Robert Gelding

The King Stephan Wechsler

The Dragon Robin Newman

1st Soldier Keith Aberdein

2nd Soldier Micbael Free

Chorus of Soldiers Lise Larsen, Jean More, Nelia de Beer, Anna de Beer, Mary Wechsler, John Boswell, Rodney Holland, Robin Ulyate

On April 1, 1955, the pupils of Arusha School performed " The Charcoal Burner's Son " by L. du Garde Peach and Victor Hely Hutchinson, for the entertainment of the people of Arusha.

The play consisted of five leading characters : the Princess, the King, the Ogre, the Charcoal Burner's Son and the Dragon. There was also a chorus of soldiers who made up the army and sang some very comical songs which greatly amused the audience.

The Princess sang very delightfully and was greatly applauded as also were the King and the Charcoal Burner's Son. These three had many different solos to sing and aided by the chorus helped to make the play a great success.

We heartily congratulate Mrs. Joy, our Music Mistress, who conducted the singing, and Miss Robertson who produced the play. We also congratulate Miss Elliott who painted all the scenery which made the stage look very colourful.

The scenery consisted of two large trees, a very impressive-looking castle which belonged to the Ogre, and a hill on which the castle was situated. The whole stage looked as if it were in fairyland.

Jean More Aged 12 years

The Elocution Contest

Our annual Elocution Contest was held in the second term of the year. It began on July 14 with the Junior classes competing for a huge cake. Standard 1 won this, having acted " Little Black Sambo " very well.

The Elocution continued with the middle school competing for a silver candlestick. Standard 2 came top in this section. Their play " The Discontented Fir Tree " was about a tree who wanted different leaves. In the end he saw that other leaves had their drawbacks, so he asked for his needles to be returned, and all ended well.

Standard 4 and 4A, Secondary Forms 1 and 2 competed for the remaining candlestick. Secondary Form 2 and Standard 4 shared the honour of the prize. Secondary Form 2 acted the trial scene from " The Merchant of Venice," in which Jean More as Antonio, Gilda Troup as Gratiano, Ann Brooker as Portia and Michael Free as Shylock acted very well.

I think the Elocution Contest was a success, and we all enjoyed watching little plays instead of listening to the usual recitations.

Vanessa Hocking Aged 10 years

Extract ID: 5675

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 12a
Extract Date: 1956

The Last Fence ~ The Trumpeter

Extract ID: 5680

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

Swan Lake ~ Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of our journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we had still sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-Wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last, in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night I felt queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming about outside! When I woke up in the morning, I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2,000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants or buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. 1 eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded in my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater, which we had just visited.

Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson

Extract ID: 5681

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Page Number: 22-23
Extract Date: 1956

A Ride on the Winged Horse ~ To "Cloudy" ~ Stamps ~ The Thunderstorm

TO " CLOUDY "

In my heart there lives a memory of your dear face,

In my mind there is ever a kindly thought of you,

Your strong duty to your God, your service and your grace.

May we live for Him, inspired by your life anew.

In our school you worked with all the little girls and boys,

Showed them kindness, how to live together, how to pray,

Loved them like a mother, shared their sorrows and their joys.

They will not forget you or the things you used to say.

ANON

In memory of Sister Gertrude Cloudsdale, Senior Matron, Arusha School 1945-49.

Extract ID: 5686

See also

Arusha School Magazine
Extract Author: Julia Bruce and Carolyn Pearson
Page Number: 13
Extract Date: 1956

School Trip to Ngorongoro Crater

The crisp early morning air stung the faces of the twenty-eight eager children who scanned the familiar outskirts of the Arusha District.

Once off the tarmac road we met the vast expanse of thorn-bush and scrub dotted with animals which aroused great excitement amongst us.

After the interest of the first part of the journey, we reached the turning to Oldeani, which indicated that we still had sixty miles to go. Through rather monotonous scenery, the road gradually twisted its way higher and higher into a more densely forested area until we reached a view-point. Looking down on the immense plain dotted with pleasant colours of green and brown, twenty-eight pairs of eyes keenly devoured the majestic scenery around.

Arriving at Mtu-wa-Mbu, the lorry came to a halt under a shady Acacia tree, where we spent a few minutes. On and on the road twisted and turned as the lorry wound its way slowly up the slope, passing miles and miles of green, and yet greener scenery as we ascended, climbing higher up the mountainside.

At last in front of us we saw a large notice board indicating the way to the Serengeti Plains which were to our right. At the sight of this our spirits rose, and everybody craned their necks in order to get the first view of the crater. As it came in sight hardly a cough was heard, as we gazed fascinated at the wondrous sight before us. At last we were settled in our huts, which were very comfortable, containing two bunks, a fireplace, and a table and chair.

That night was very queer indeed, and I imagined I heard many wild beasts roaming outside! When I woke up in the morning I could not remember where I was and thought I was still dreaming.

The next day we went for a short outing in the lorry. We saw mainly the same game as before, zebra, ostrich and many gazelle scattered over the grassland.

On the last day of our visit we decided to walk down to the [Ngorongoro] crater, and so set off at ten o'clock, having first made all the preparations for the return journey. It was steep and rocky down the 2000 foot slope to the crater, and I slipped many times. Although we did not actually see any game on the way, some elephants and buffalo had passed through quite recently, as we saw their footprints. We saw game dotted about in the distance when we reached the bottom, and after having a short rest we started to climb the steep ascent back. I eventually reached the top exhausted and breathless, but pleased at having succeeded at my desire to reach the bottom and manage the ascent successfully.

But all good things have to come to an end, and soon afterwards we set off regretfully. On the way back, we saw much the same game as before, ostrich, zebra, gazelle and giraffe, and also a swarm of locusts, which hit the lorry with great force. But the return journey seemed to go much quicker, and we arrived back at school just before supper, full of news to tell about the Ngorongoro Crater which we had just visited.

authors were probably about eleven years old

Extract ID: 739
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